Acropolis Museum, Athens

4.5 out of 5 stars 30 Reviews

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  • Acropolis Museum
    by stevemt
  • Acropolis Museum
    by stevemt
  • The Ceramic Koryatids Minus One
    The Ceramic Koryatids Minus One
    by janetanne
  • greekcypriot's Profile Photo

    The Virtual Reality Theatre

    by greekcypriot Updated Apr 17, 2014

    2 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    A brilliant way for visitors of the Acropolis Museum to recreate and imagine the impressive sanctuary through 3D video screenings and aid of 3D models.

    The Virtual Reality Theater is located on the ground floor. The 10minute ‘Acropolis in Antiquity’ presents the topography and the monuments of the Rock of the Acropolis during the prehistoric, Archaic and the classical period.

    DAYS: Weekends only.

    TIP: Recommended for viewers over 13 years of age. Screenings start on time and visitors are to arrive at the Museum foyer at least 10 minutes prior to the programmed screening time. (Maximum seats 40 persons).

    TIME: The English projections start at 11:00 am while the Greek ones at 12noon. The Fee is only €1.00.
    It is advisable to book before going. This can be made from Monday to Friday from 9:00 to 5:00pm.

    The Entrance of the Museum Inside the Museum
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    Acropoli's museum

    by xaver Written Jun 16, 2011

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    In my opinion, the museum itself, not considering what is exposed inside, would be worth a visit. Here you get the chance to see the original marbles and sculptures from Acropolis, and the natural light of the museum, lets you enjoy them even more.There are more than 4000 ahndicrafts coming from the arcaic and classical period and looking through the glass floor of the museum you can also see the streets and the buildings of the ancient neighborhoods of Athens.
    You can arrive here using the metro and coming out at Akropolis station, the ticket is 5€ and the opening time is:

    Tuesday to Sunday: 8.00 a.m. to 8.00 p.m.
    Last admission: 7.30 p.m.
    Galleries cleared at 7.45 p.m.
    The Museum is open every Friday until 10 p.m.
    Monday: Closed.
    Closed: 1 January, 25 March, Easter Sunday, 1 May, 25 December and 26 December.

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    The Acropolis Museum

    by JessieLang Written May 26, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This is an incredible museum—there are all sorts of beautiful things that came from the buildings on the Acropolis, including the original Caryatids. They aren’t way overhead in the distance at the museum (like the copies are at the site) and you can every detail. Each one of them has a different elaborate hairstyle, and they are beautiful.

    Archaeologists are on duty inside the museum to answer visitors' questions (look for red & white buttons).

    There are some excavated ruins right in front of the museum that have been covered with glass, and the walkway goes on each side of them. No photos are allowed inside the museum at all, so I have no pictures other than the ruins out front.

    Open Tues-Sun, 8-8; closed major holidays. 5 Euro admission. No photos

    Excavations by the museum
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    NEW ACROPOLIS MUSEUM OPENS

    by janetanne Updated Apr 17, 2011

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The museum’s much-anticipated opening puts an end to a decades-long series of delays, obstacles and critics.

    “Every great work is in a way a source of provocation and scandal,” said Culture Minister Antonis Samaras at the June 17 presentation. “But it is ultimately these great works - and not the objections they provoked - that leave an indelible mark on their era. The New Acropolis Museum is a symbol of a country which respects its past and honours it with works comparable to those of our ancestors.”

    The first thing visitors see, as they walk up the ramp to the main exhibits, are the 5 Caryatids standing vigil. The best preserved of the six Caryatid statues was taken by Lord Elgin in the 18th century and is now held at the British Museum, while the remaining five originals have been on display at the new Acropolis Museum. A vacant space, among the five remaining, marks the void of the stolen statue...in anticipation of her return.

    Tickets for the museum’s first three days of operation - purchased exclusively online through the museum’s site (www.theacropolismusuem.gr) - were sold out on June 15 within a few hours of becoming available.

    Museum officials estimate that the 20,000m2 glass-and-concrete museum can accommodate simultaneously between 1,200 and 1,500 people. Its capacity is 10,000 visitors in the course of a 12-hour day (8am-8pm).

    For a museum that aims to welcome and befriend its visitors, avoiding heavy queueing is a priority. In order for the gallery halls not to become congested, specially appointed personnel will work towards the even distribution of museumgoers.

    As part of its visitor-friendly policy, the museum also offers a spacious reception area, a ground-floor cafe, a second-floor restaurant-cafe with panoramic views of the Acropolis, a virtual-reality theatre and a temporary exhibition gallery. Recommended time for a full visit is three hours.

    Unlike the steep entrance prices of international museums, the New Acropolis Museum ticket is at a budget-friendly 1 euro - the price of a public bus ticket - through to the end of 2009 and 5 euros as of 2010.

    The Ceramic Koryatids Minus One
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    New Acropolis Museum

    by jlanza29 Updated Apr 15, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Unfortunately, the only thing wrong about this museum is that they don't allow any photos inside the building !!!! But other than that this is a world class museum .... The cost of admission is 5 Euro's and give yourselves about 2 hours to see the entire place. on the 3rd floor there's a nice deck facing the Acropolis where you can take some great photos !!!! Highly recommended !!!!! A MUST DO !!!!

    World class ��� must do !!!!

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    ACROPOLIS MUSEUM

    by STRATOS79 Written Mar 17, 2011

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    The archaeological museum of the Acropolis is one of the most important museums of the world that includes unique collection from the Bronze Age until the Byzantine era. The exhibits follow a chronological order and they are divided into 4 levels. The museum also has an amphitheatre, a virtual theatre, museum shop, café and it is open from Tuesday to Sunday: 8.00 a.m. to 8.00 p.m

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    Acropolis Museum

    by stevemt Written Mar 13, 2011

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    This is a new museum which has been well thought out.

    The floor is partially glass so as the visitors can see the excavations underneath.

    As per all Greek museums, this is world class, excellent layout.

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    Acropolis Museum

    by iaint Written Dec 26, 2010

    Just opened in 2009. A spectacular building, built over ongoing excavations (see photos). If you’re into Greek antiquities and/or history it must be 7th heaven. I’m not, so I was there out of general curiosity.

    No photography allowed inside, so I can’t help with a sneak preview. Maybe on the website...

    As an aside, in places like this where it is made clear at every stage that photography is not allowed, why do people still do it? Are they thick? Ignorant? Both?

    The collection is pretty spectacular, I’ll admit. The controversy surrounds what’s missing. The Elgin Marbles. These comprise 2/3 (that’s two thirds) of the sculptures etc which adorned the Parthenon, removed (“seized” is the word used in Greece) in 1799 by the Earl of Elgin and then sold to the British Museum. The Greeks want them back. The English want to keep them. The museum has been built to accommodate them, as leverage in the tussle.

    The Elgin family live near me, and probably claim to be Scots (the kind who sold Scotland to the English). I’m with the Greeks on this one. No question.

    Entry was €5.

    the entrance an ongoing excavation finished? or work in progress?
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    The New Acropolis Museum

    by iblatt Updated Nov 1, 2010

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    The invaluable, pricelss works of art found on the acropolis used to be displayed in the old, outdated acropolis museum. In 2009 the New Acropolis Museum was inaugurated, underneath and across from the acropolis itself. The new nuseum is an architectural masterpiece, although some Athenians criticized its sharp angles as too modern.

    When you are about to enter the museum take a look underneath you: under the transparent floor lie the excavated remains of ancient Athens' streets and private houses. Inside, the entrance hall contains a model of Athens in the Roman period (see photo) and other exhibits.

    On the way leading up from the entrance to the first floor there are many interesting exhibits, found in the ancient private homes of Athens: from containers and kitchen utensils to children's toys. A stone box with a heavy stone lid and a hole in its middle was used for wedding offerings for the young couples.

    The first display which greets you on the first floor is the relief from the pediment of the more ancient version of the parthenon. Remarkably much is preserved, with a beautiful hunting scene of two lions subduing a bull. You can also find a friendly-looking dragon with multiple bodies and heads!
    You then find yourself walking in a sculpture garden of free-standing statues from the archaic and high-classical periods. I particularly liked the young farmer with a calf held around his head, in awe of the sacred acropolis where he made his pilgrimage to present the sacrifice to the goddess Athena. Other statues, of nude male athletes, show the sculptors' talent and knowledge of the anatomy of the musculoskeletal system, Although females were sculpted dressed and not nude, the contours of their graceful bodies are very clear under the flowing lines of the thin robes.

    The highlight of the first floor are the Caryatids, five out of the original six, who carried the heavy weight of the porch of the erechteon for 2500 years. The missing sixth Caryatid was taken away to Britain (or rather plundered) by Lord Elgin in the 18th century. The Caryatids' calm and elegance is unsurpassed. The thick pony tail at the back of their head is an ingenious way of enabling these statues to support the heavy weight of the porch without giving the female figures thick, unbecoming necks!

    The second floor has an open balcony with a superb view of the acropolis. This is where the museum cafe is located, and we had very tasty spinach pies here. This is also the only place in the museum where you may take photos.

    The third floor is dedicated to the parthenon. The central part of this floor is a schematic full size model of the parthenon. When you walk around it you can see the remains of the outstanding reliefs of the friezes and pediments. Athena's birth out of Zeus' head on one pediment, the competition between Athena and Posseidon over Athens on the other pediment. And do not forget the battle between centaurs and humans on the frieze!
    Several of the original pieces are missing and have been repalced by copies (the snow-white plaster betrays them); where are the originals? You guessed right: Lord Elgin carried them away to London!

    The New Acropolis Musuem has the perfect setting to display all of these amazing artistic archeological remains.

    Entrance, New Acropolis Museum, Athens New Acropolis Museum, Athens Entrance, New Acropolis Museum, Athens Balcony cafe, New Acropolis Museum, Athens Excavations outside New Acropolis Museum, Athens
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    The new Acropolis museum.

    by cachaseiro Written Sep 28, 2010

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    The new Acropolis museum has replaced the small museum that was formerly on the Acropolis hill, but now they have a fantastic museum on the foothill that displays the things found on the Acropolis hill in the best way possible.
    Whenh the museum was build there was an archeological site discoverd underneath the museum and it has been excavated too and is on display through the glass floor of the museum which gives the whole place a really unique feel.

    The new Acropolis museum. Looking through the glass floor at the museum.
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    The New Acropolis Museum

    by Maryimelda Written Feb 28, 2010

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    The New Acropolis Museum is situated right across the street from the entrance to the Acropolis site. It covers an area of 25,000 sq metres with 14,000 sq metre of displays.

    Hours
    Tuesday to Sunday: 8.00 a.m. to 8.00 p.m.
    Monday: Closed.
    Last admission: 7.30 p.m.
    Galleries cleared at 7.45 p.m.
    Closed: 1 January, 25 March, Easter Sunday, 1 May, 25 December and 26 December.

    Admission
    General admission fee: 5 euros.
    Reduced admission fee: 3 euros.Purchase tickets on site or on the website:
    www.acropolismuseum.gr

    Public entrance at Dionysiou Areopagitou Street.

    The new Acropolis Museum
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    The Acropolis Museum

    by Christianne Updated Sep 22, 2009

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    Working hours
    Monday: Closed
    Tuesday-Sunday: 8.00 a.m. to 8.00 p.m.
    Last admission: 7.30 p.m.
    Closed 1 January, 25 March, Easter Sunday, 1 May, 25 December and 26 December.

    Tickets price : 1 euro (for the moment)

    How to purchase tickets:
    1.From the Museum desk
    2. Via e-ticketing

    Taking pictures is not permitted inside the Museum

    The Acropolis Museum The Acropolis Museum The Acropolis Musem The Acropolis Museum The Acropolis Museum
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    NEW ACROPOLIS MUSEUM

    by janetanne Updated Jun 27, 2009

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    The New Acropolis Museum is a magnificent monument showcasing the old within the modern walls of what can only be described as 'AMAZING.' The first time I walked up toward the entrance, my eyes were naturally focused above as I walked towards the towering portico and tried to gather in all the new dimensions. I was just in total amazement and thrilled as I moved closer to the huge structure made of marble, glass and steel. Suddenly, I felt the texture of the ground below change from the smooth marble walkway that had led me so far, become something smoother and slightly slippery. I looked down and to my disbelief, I was standing on a thick glass panel that gave light below...far, far below, to the exposed ancient walls and ruins of the city that had once housed the Ancient Athenians during the same time as the Acropolis was at its height of importance. What an incredible feeling!

    By All Means...Go at NIGHT, to see the dramatic effects of the lighting under the museum and through the glass walkways.

    All Lit Up for Night Viewing Stepping on the Past through Glass of Today
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    Repatriated Masterpieces

    by janetanne Updated Dec 10, 2008

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    The exhibition titles 'NOSTOI' will be showing in the New Acropolis Museum from 24 Sept. -31 Dec. 2008. " The repatriation of an ancient artifact is always a splendid occasion and is welcomed by everyone. Equally important, however, are the systematic efforts made by the Departments of the MInistry of Culture to protect antiquities and prevent their illegal trading and removal from Greece. The sensitization of citizens to this joint endeavor is of great significance and was the objective of the exhibition Nostoi, which was first mounted in Italy in 2007 and is now presented in the New Acropolis Museum.

    Statues Standing with Duck Two Griffons tearing apart hind Ancient Greek Theatre Scene
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    See the Exhibits Being Prepared

    by janetanne Written Dec 6, 2008

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    If you walk up the stairs...if you are allowed...take the opportunity to see the old marble statues that have been moved from the old Acropolis Museum down to this new home of theirs.

    Fascinating...Historical...worth the effort.

    From the top of the stairway, turn around and see the Caryatids looking down from their new home. Very Erie to think that for thousands of years, these statues stood outside beneath the Blue Greek Sky, exposed to all the elements, and now, here they are inside a modern museum. Do you think they miss the Athenian breeze cooling their marble skin?

    Looking Back to the Bottom of the New Stairs
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