Acropolis - Propylaea, Athens

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  • Propylaea from outside
    Propylaea from outside
    by eksvist
  • Propylaea from inside on Acropolis
    Propylaea from inside on Acropolis
    by eksvist
  • Athens - Acropolis - Propylaea
    Athens - Acropolis - Propylaea
    by Kuznetsov_Sergey
  • mallyak's Profile Photo

    The Propylaea at Acropollis

    by mallyak Written Aug 20, 2008

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    The monumental gateway of the Acropolis was designed by the architect Mnesikles and constructed in 437-432 B.C. It comprises a central building and two lateral wings. The colonnades along the west and east sides had a row of Doric columns while two rows of Ionic columns divided the central corridor into three parts. The walls of the north wing were decorated with painted panels or wall paintings and that is why it was called the "Pinakotheke". The ceiling of the Propylaea had coffers with painted decoration and a perforated sima around the roof.

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    The Propylaea

    by mallyak Written Aug 21, 2008

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    The monumental gateway of the Acropolis was designed by the architect Mnesikles and constructed in 437-432 B.C. It comprises a central building and two lateral wings. The colonnades along the west and east sides had a row of Doric columns while two rows of Ionic columns divided the central corridor into three parts. The walls of the north wing were decorated with painted panels or wall paintings and that is why it was called the "Pinakotheke". The ceiling of the Propylaea had coffers with painted decoration and a perforated sima around the roof.

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  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Propylaea

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Jul 23, 2008

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    Athens - Acropolis - Propylaea
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    Monumental gateway is based on the original Propylaea that serves as the entrance to the Acropolis. The Propylaea was constructed in the V-th century BC of white Pentelic marble and gray Eleusinian marble or limestone.

    The structure consists of a central building with two adjoining wings on the west (outer) side, one to the north and one to the south. The core is the central building, which presents a standard six-columned Doric façade both on the West to those entering the Acropolis and on the east to those departing.

    The Propylaea survived intact through the Greek, Roman and Byzantine periods. During the period of Latin Empire, it served as the palace of the de la Roche family. It was severely damaged by an explosion of a powder magazine in 1656. A tower of French or Ottoman date, erected on the south wing, was pulled down in 1874.

    You may watch my high resolution photo of Acropolis on the Google Earth according to the following coordinates 37º 58' 18.06" N 23º 43' 28.52" E or on my Google Earth Panoramio Propylaea.

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  • LoriPori's Profile Photo

    ACROPOLIS _ THE PROPYLAIA

    by LoriPori Written Jun 26, 2007

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    The Propylaia
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    Built in the Doric order, THE PROPYLAIA were designed as a dramatic entrance to the Acropolis rock. It is an impressive building and one approaches it via an inclining ramp.
    Mnesikles was the architect and he began building the Propylaia right after the main construction of the Parthenon was completed in 437 B.C.
    Like most of the Acropolis buildings, the Propylaia was undergoing restorations.

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  • Jmill42's Profile Photo

    Propylaia

    by Jmill42 Written Mar 16, 2004

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    Part of the Propylaia

    Inside the Beule Gate are the remains of what was the official gate in ancient times, the Propylaia. It was the arch the Plato, Socrates, and all the others would have considered the entrance into the "high city". Today, it is a massive jumble of pillars, columns and rocks. Be VERY careful here, as this was the place that was most slippery. Know that I was here on a hot day, with no rain in the past month, and it was still very slick.

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  • BorneoGrrl's Profile Photo

    The Propylaea - Entrance to the Acropolis

    by BorneoGrrl Written Sep 4, 2007

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    The Propylaea

    Just before entering into the top of the Acropolis, you come to the Propylaea, a huge gateway made of marble. Many stairs lead you upwards through the through stone Doric colonnades that surround the facade. In ancient Greece, the people who come to Acropolis must be clean before they can enter so as they arrive, they can get themselves cleaned, fed & rested at the Propylaea.

    The design of the Propylaea has inspired many structures around the world.

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  • Pieter11's Profile Photo

    The Propylaea

    by Pieter11 Written May 22, 2005

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    Propylaea
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    The Propylaea is the monumental gateway to the Acropolis. Translated litterly from ancient Greek, it means "front-gates".

    This gate was built in order of the Athenian leader Pericles, as a respond to the devastations during the Persian Wars. The architect Mnesicles designed a gateway made out of white marble, with a stoa at each side of the central gates. At the left side you´ll find the Pinacotheke, named so because there were found a lot of great painting in this wing. At the other side you´ll find the temple of Athena Nike.

    Due to the start of the Penoponnesian War in 431 B.C. the Propylaea has never been finished. It survived the Latin and Byzantian time and in the Latin time it served as a palace for a the Duke of Athens. In 1656 the building was damages severely due to an explosion of a powder magazine (the Acroplois was used as storage space back then).

    Today the Propylaea have been restorated for a big part, but the work will continue for years. It is still used as the main entrance for the thousends of tourists that visit the Acropolis every year. Climbing the steps, going in through the central gate and entering the Sacred Way that leads to the Parthenon.

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  • Pakistaniguy's Profile Photo

    THE ACROPOLIS: Propylaia

    by Pakistaniguy Updated Jun 10, 2003

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    Swiss_spirit (Chris) standing at Propylaia

    The Propylaia formed the towering entrance to the Acropolis in ancient times. Built in 437-432 BC, its architecural brilliancs ranks with that of the Parthenon. It consists of a central hall, with two wings on either sides. Each section had a gate, and in ancient times these 5 gates were the only entrances to the 'Upper City'. The Middle gate opened to the Panethenaic Way. The ceiling of the central hall was painted with gold stars on a dark blue background. The northern wing was used as a picture gallery and the southern wing was the antechamber to the 'Temple of Athena Nike'.

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  • Pakistaniguy's Profile Photo

    THE ACROPOLIS: Propylaia

    by Pakistaniguy Updated Jun 10, 2003

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    This Drawing shows how Propylaia use to be !!!

    Propylaia was badly damaged in the 1700's AD when a lightening strike set off an explosion in a Turkish gunpowder store.Reconstruction took place between 1909-1917 and there was further restoration after World War II. Once you are through Propylaia, there is a stunning view of the Parthenon ahead.

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  • gale.blog.pl's Profile Photo

    Acropolis - the Propylaea

    by gale.blog.pl Updated Mar 14, 2005

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    Acropolis Propylaea

    The Acropolis Propylaea constitute the main gate to the Acropolis. Nowadays the place is always crowded with tourists entering Acropolis. We need to remember that the Propylaea have always been the only only entry to the Acropolis.

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  • viddra's Profile Photo

    The Propylaea

    by viddra Written Sep 22, 2005

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    the grand ancient gateway
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    This is the monumental entrance to the temple (therefore the name) that people usually just pass through, without stopping, on their way to the Parthenon.

    It was completed in 432 just before the outbreak of the Peloponnesian wars, following the designs of Mnesicles, Phidias's colleague.

    To the left is the Pinacotheca (the gallery of paintings) that got that name because it used to be decorated with beautiful paintings. To the right is the small Temple of Athena Nike (Athena of Victory) which commemorates the Athenian victory over the Persians.

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  • Juliet67's Profile Photo

    The Propylaea

    by Juliet67 Written Sep 2, 2002

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    The monumental gateway of the Acropolis was designed by the architect Mnesikles and constructed in 437-432 B.C. It comprises a central building and two lateral wings. The colonnades along the west and east sides had a row of Doric columns while two rows of Ionic columns divided the central corridor into three parts. The walls of the north wing were decorated with painted panels or wall paintings and that is why it was called the 'Pinakotheke'. The ceiling of the Propylaea had coffers with painted decoration and a perforated sima around the roof.

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  • Acropolis - Propylaea - as it used to be.

    by janbeeu Updated Jul 17, 2005

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    The Propylaea

    Access to the Acropolis has always been from the west, even as far back as the Mycenaean period. In Pisistratus time, the Acropolis became unequivocally a centre of religion. The ancient temples were restored and an imposing propylon was built at the point where the entrance had been in prehistoric times. This was destroyed by the Persians in 480 BC and there remain only a few traces of its foundatations on the slope to the southeast of Mnesicles Propylaea.

    The Greeks used the term Propylon in the singular for a porch at the entrance to a shrine or palace, while the plural Propylaea was used for a monumental entrance with several doors like those of the Parthenon, Eleusis and Epidauros.

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  • call_me_rhia's Profile Photo

    Propylaea

    by call_me_rhia Updated Sep 29, 2011
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    The Propylaea is the monumental entrance to the Acropolis; it dates back to in 437 and it took 5 years to complete. The structure is made of a central building and two lateral wings, with colonnades of Doric and Ionic columns. If you have never been to Greece but think you have seen the central portion of the Propylaea before – then chances are that you have been to Germany: both the Brandenburg Gate of Berlin and the Propylaea in Munich have been copied from the Athenian Propylaea.

    It’s hard to tell there was a central building from what is left today as it was badly damaged by an explosion of a powder magazine in 1656. Passing through its columns you only note that you are entering the plateau where the Acropolis is located, but you don’t have the feeling that a building had once stood there. Things may change, though… in July 2011 there was scaffolding around the Propylaea and renovation works were in process

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  • eksvist's Profile Photo

    Propylaea

    by eksvist Written Jul 25, 2008
    Propylaea from outside
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    A Propylaea, Propylea or Propylaia is a monumental gateway that serves as the entrance to the Acropolis. The word propylaea is the union of the prefix pro (before or in front of) plus the plural of the Greek pylon or pylaion (gate), meaning literally that which is before the gates, but the word has come to mean simply gate building.
    The monumental gateway to the Acropolis, the Propylaea was built under the general direction of the Athenian leader Pericles. Construction began in 437 BC and was terminated in 432, when the building was still unfinished.
    The Propylaea was constructed of white Pentelic marble and gray Eleusinian marble or limestone, which was used only for accents.

    Today the Propylaea has been partly restored, and serves as the main entrance to the Acropolis for the many thousands of tourists who visit the area every year.

    Opening times and prices look from my Acropolis tip.

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