Ancient and Roman Agora, Athens

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  • view of the agora
    view of the agora
    by didier06
  • Stoa of Attalos
    Stoa of Attalos
    by didier06
  • Roman Agora
    Roman Agora
    by mishgreek
  • mindcrime's Profile Photo

    Tower of the Winds

    by mindcrime Updated Mar 30, 2014

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    Just east of the Ancient Agora is the Roman Agora (pic 1) which used to have many roman buildings but now mainly some remains of ancient columns can be seen and only a few structures. The entrance fee is only 2euros or free with the combo Acropolis ticket (12e including also Acropolis, Ancient Agora, Kerameikos, Temple of Zeus, Harian’s Library) so you can get around and check the place.

    At one side stands the Gate of Athena Archegetis (pic 2) that was built in 11BC with four doric columns and was dedicated of course to the great patroness goddess of the Athenians.

    There’s also Fethiye mosque(pic 3) that was built in 1458 just after the ottoman conquest of the Duchy of Athens. It was built over the ruins of a byzantine church. From 1834 until early 20th century it was used as a military bakery and later as storage place for the archaeological excavations in the area.

    One of my favourite monuments on the Roman agora is the Tower of the Winds that lies at the other side of the Agora behind the mosque(pics 4-5). We use to call it just “Aerides”(winds) but it is also known as “Horologion(timepiece) of Andronicos” (the Macedonian astronomer that build it around 50BC). The tower was excavated by the Greek Archaeological Society in 1845. Before that time it was partly buried in the ground and in early Christian times was used as the bell tower of a church!

    The octagonal tower is made by pentelic marble, its high is 12m, it has a diameter of 8m, with a Doric interior, Corinthian exterior and originally was topped by a revolving bronze weather vane depicting Triton that had a wand in his hand indicated the direction from which the wind was blowing! What’s more, there was a water clock(that’s why it’s also called horologion) in the interior of the tower supplied by water coming from the Acropolis.

    In each side you can see a sculpted figure of the eight winds (in ancient Greece the winds were Gods that had divine powers):
    Borias (N, He blows the cold north wind through a large shell),
    Kaikias (NE, He throws a basket of hailstones),
    Evrus (E, An old man with beard is wrapped in a cloak),
    Apeliotis (SE, A man bringing fruits and grain),
    Notos (S, Bearer of rain, he empties a pot of water),
    Lips (SW, He holds the stern of a ship, promising a good sailing wind),
    Zephyros (W, A young man scattering flowers),
    Skiron (NW, He scatters glowing ashes from a bronze vessel)

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    used the tickets

    by mishgreek Written May 17, 2012

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    Roman Agora
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    The entrance of this sights are included in the 12euros entrance fee for the Acropolis.In greek language ΑΓΟΡΑ(AGORA)=Market(english).But this place doesn't mean a market.Ancient Agora is the place where the ancient greeks plead or to discuss a matter for all the community this is derives from the verb word ΑΡΟΡΕΥΩ(AGOREVO)=I plead.

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  • didier06's Profile Photo

    Athens agora

    by didier06 Updated Mar 25, 2012
    view of the agora
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    Located below the Acropolis, the Agora was a meeting and trading place, temples and a lot of public buildings were built. The site was vandalized several times,especially by the Romans in 84 BC and the Heruli in 267 after JC and finally abandoned towards the end of the VI century.
    By visiting the Agora, you can admire the Hephaisteion or Theseion ( the temple of Hephaestus) probably the best-preserved ancient Greek temple.
    The museum of the Agora is located in the Stoa of Attalos ( a king of Pergamon) the building destroyed by the Heruli in 267 after JC was in the 1950s fully reconstructed.

    Time for the visit of the Agora: 2/3 hours
    Ticket: price included in the Acropolis ticket

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  • call_me_rhia's Profile Photo

    Agora

    by call_me_rhia Updated Sep 28, 2011

    The Agora used to be the centre of ond Athina: it was a large square where people would meet and assemble. The reasons were several and different: it could be a market, an election, a performance, a religious fstival, a competitions os some sort, or even a military drill. Any sort of sctivity, indeed, could take palce there.

    All around the square, public buildings would be found - basically those necessary to run the city: for example the council chamber, the magistrates’ offices, the mint, and the archives and so on. Anbd - of course - shops! the decline of the Agora started after the Slavic invasion in A.D. 580, when the site was gradually abandoned.

    Great parts of it have been brought back to light, but excavations are still going on and there's really a lot to visit in the area. Information about opening times and admission can be found in the website listed below.

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  • hquittner's Profile Photo

    Into the Agora

    by hquittner Updated Aug 27, 2011

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    Tower of the Winds
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    There are only three more or less complete large structures in the Agora. At the west edge of the Agora stands the Temple of Hephaestus built between 449-44 BC. Along the eastern side is the Stoa of Attalos from the 2C BC, very damaged and rebuilt between 1953-56. The third structure is the Horologium or Tower of the Winds standing further northwest at the edge of the adjacent Roman Agora.

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    Roman Agora

    by xaver Written Jun 16, 2011

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    tower of the winds
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    In the Roman Agora, the tower of the wind is one of the few ancient buildings and ancient clocks that stands almost intact.
    This is a An octagonal marble structure with a conical roof and was built by the astronomer Andronicus from Macedonia in the middle of the 1st century BC.

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    Ancient Agora

    by xaver Written Jun 16, 2011

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    ancient agora
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    The Ancient Agora in Athens is the city's most popular agora.
    In addition to being a place where people gathered to buy and sell all kinds of commodities, it was also a place where people assembled to discuss all kinds of topics: business, politics, current events, or the nature of the universe and the divine.Here, where ancient Greek democracy came to life, you get a wonderful opportunity to have an idea of the commercial, political, religious, and cultural life of one of the great cities of the ancient world.
    Metro stop: monastiraki.

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  • eksvist's Profile Photo

    Roman Agora & Tower of the Winds

    by eksvist Updated Apr 4, 2011
    Roman Agora and the Tower of the Winds
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    Roman Agora actually has nothing to do with Romans, They give this name because it was constructed during Roman times -1st century CE- in order to serve a growing Athens.

    It is a single architectural complex, measuring 111 x 98 m., consisting of a vast rectangular court, surrounded by colonnades. The courtyard was surrounded by stoas, shops and storerooms. It has an east, Ionic propylon and a west, Doric propylon, known as the Gate of Athena Archegetis, which linked it to the Greek Agora. It was built between 19 and 11 BCE with a donation of Julius Caesar and Augustus.

    Horologion of Andronicos - Tower of the Winds
    The octagonal tower (3.20 m. long on each side) stands on a base of three steps and is built of white Pentelic marble.
    It has a conical roof, a cylindrical annex on the south side, and two Corinthian porches, one on the NE and one on the NW side. At the top of each of the eight sides there is a relief representation of a wind, symbolized by a male figure with the appropriate attributes and its name inscribed on the stone. There were sundials on the external walls and an elaborate waterclock in the interior. The tower was built in the first half of the 1st century B.C. by the astronomer Andronicos, from Kyrrhos in Macedonia.

    You can visit Roman Agora with ticket of Acropolis. Look about the ticket prices from my Acropolis tip.

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  • Jim_Eliason's Profile Photo

    Ancient (greek ) Agora

    by Jim_Eliason Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Ancient (greek ) Agora
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    This is the old market place that dates back to the city -state time of Athens. This area was the heart of civic life in ancient Athens and dates back to 6th century BC. The site is large and has many ruins and a museum on the site. The best preserved of which is the temple of Hephaistos.

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  • Jim_Eliason's Profile Photo

    Roman Agora

    by Jim_Eliason Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Roman Agora
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    Built by comission of Julius Ceasar and Augustus from 19 to 11 BC it was later improved by Hadrian. The most famous structure of the agora is the perfectly preserved Tower of the Winds which is thought to predate the agora and to have been used by the astronomer Andronicus from about 150 BC.

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  • SirRichard's Profile Photo

    The Agora

    by SirRichard Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    A drawing of the agora in the old times

    The Agora was very important to ancient Greek society as public life was concentrated here. It was shaded with poplar, willows and planetrees and ornamented with fountains, temples, alters, and statues. Merchants and vendors sold all matter of items available to the ancient Greeks. Bankers and money lenders spread their tables and opened for business.
    Pay special attention to the Temple of Hephastius (or Theseium), which is the best preserved temple in all of Greece and is not always mentioned.

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  • iaint's Profile Photo

    Roman Agora

    by iaint Written Jan 1, 2011
    the Tower
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    In the 1st century AD the Romans moved the agora from its original site to this smaller one

    It includes the well preserved and impressive Tower of the Winds. This has nothing to do with the sudden impact of the Greek diet on northern European digestive systems. It was built by a Syrian astronomer (Kyrrestes) in the 2nd century BC. It was a combination of weather vane and water clock, and has 8 sides.

    Another feature of the site is the Fethiye mosque, built in 1456 by the Ottomans.

    This is another site covered by the Acropolis multi-entry ticket.

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  • iaint's Profile Photo

    Agora

    by iaint Updated Jan 1, 2011
    the Temple - from a distance
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    This is another site (like the Acropolis) with several elements to it. The area was the ancient marketplace, and was founded in the 6th century BC. It continued for 1,200 years!

    It is where democracy began - Socrates addressing the public. It is where Christianity came to Greece - St Paul preached here and started converting.

    The Agora Museum is part of the Agora site, and your ticket for the site give you entry to the museum. It is a reconstruction of the Stoa of Attalos - a 2nd century BC shopping mall. Cool.

    The Temple of Hephaestus is the best preserved building on the site, and in fact the best preserved classical temple on mainland Greece.

    Entry is €4, or as part of the €12 Acropolis ticket.

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  • penny_g's Profile Photo

    The Ancient Agora

    by penny_g Written Dec 16, 2010
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    This is one of the best preserved agoras in whole Greece. It can be dated back 3000 BC. The agora in Athens had private housing, until it was reorganized by Peisistratus in the 6th century BC. Although he may have lived on the agora himself, he removed the other houses, closed wells, and made it the centre of Athenian government. It was the heart of Athens and the center of the Greek cultural, political, social, economic and administrative life.

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  • Maryimelda's Profile Photo

    Roman Agora

    by Maryimelda Updated Feb 27, 2010

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    Tower of the Winds
    1 more image

    North of the Acropolis and not far from the Plaka area stands the ruins of the Roman Agora. It is linked by a pathway to the Ancient Greek Agora. These were built as the commercial centres in ancient Athens with the Roman Agora eventually replacing the Ancient Greek Agora. The Roman Agora dates back to the 1st or 2nd centuries BC. This is a matter for debate as some say the 1st and others say the 2nd century which was the Hellnistic period. In the eastern section of the Roman Agora there still stands the remains of the Tower of the Winds. This is an eight sided structure that was designed as an asronomical clock.

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