Ancient and Roman Agora, Athens

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  • view of the agora
    view of the agora
    by didier06
  • Stoa of Attalos
    Stoa of Attalos
    by didier06
  • Roman Agora
    Roman Agora
    by mishgreek
  • mallyak's Profile Photo

    Ancient Agora

    by mallyak Written Aug 23, 2008

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    The agora in Athens had private housing, until it was reorganized by Peisistratus in the 6th century BC. Although he may have lived on the agora himself, he removed the other houses, closed wells, and made it the centre of Athenian government. He also built a drainage system, mountains and a temple to the Olympian gods. Cimon later improved the agora by constructing new buildings and planting trees. In the 5th century BC there were temples constructed to Hephaestus, Zeus and Apollo
    The only standing Byzantine monument in the Agora is the Church of the Holy Apostles (XI century)

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    The Ancient Agora

    by Lilasel Written Nov 13, 2004

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    The Ancient Agora of Athens was the centre of the religious, commercial and public life of the city. Originally it was an open space, which was flanked gradually by public buildings and commercial arcades, temples and altars dedicated to the gods, as well as statues of prominent citizens and foreign benefactors. One of the most outstanding edifices in the Agora is the Stoa of Attalos, which was built in about 150 BC through the donation of Attalus II, king of Pergamon. In the 1950s the Stoa was reconstructed by the American School of Classical Studies and today it houses the Museum of the Ancient Agora.

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    The Roman Agora

    by Lilasel Written Nov 13, 2004

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    The Roman Agora was completed in 11 BC thanks to funds donated first by Julius Caesar and then by Octavian Augustus. Survivals of this typical agora include its monumental gate, dedicated to Athena Archegetis, its central courtyard, which had an Ionian peristyle, the Horologion of Andronikos or Tower of the Winds, which operated simultaneously as weather vane, water clock and sundial and which was converted during the Ottoman period into the tekke of the Dervishes, the public latrines (Vespasianae) and the facade, dedicated to the Theoi Sebastoi.

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    Ancient Agora

    by xaver Written Jun 16, 2011

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    The Ancient Agora in Athens is the city's most popular agora.
    In addition to being a place where people gathered to buy and sell all kinds of commodities, it was also a place where people assembled to discuss all kinds of topics: business, politics, current events, or the nature of the universe and the divine.Here, where ancient Greek democracy came to life, you get a wonderful opportunity to have an idea of the commercial, political, religious, and cultural life of one of the great cities of the ancient world.
    Metro stop: monastiraki.

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    the Ancient Agora and museum

    by mindcrime Written May 17, 2008

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    Stoa of Attalus
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    Just below Acropolis, Ancient Agora was the central place and market of the ancient city, the place where daily life was happening. In our days you wont see Socrates among the people that walk up and down but visitors of the museum that is there (interesting, don’t miss it too).

    Pisistratos built set in the area a lot of new building like fountains, a temple etc and at the same time he removed some houses to Agora to be the centre of the government. Later, at Agora almost every public meeting was taking place here, social and cultural activities and also the law courts, religious manifestations etc

    At the easter edge of Agora you can see Stoa of Attalus built by King Attalus II the king of Pergamon. Part of the building was used for stores those times. Like many other building around its also made of Pentelic marble and it is 115m wide and 20m deep. Doric order was used at the exterior colonmade while Ionic at the interior one (typical combination those times).

    What you can see now is the reconstruction of the stoa made in the 50s and turned the stoa into Ancient Agora Museum. In fact the building it’s a replica of the original stoa. And please, don’t try to put your head on the headless statues to have a funny photo! The guards will run after you anyway… :)

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    Tower of the Winds

    by mindcrime Updated Mar 30, 2014

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    Roman Agora
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    Just east of the Ancient Agora is the Roman Agora (pic 1) which used to have many roman buildings but now mainly some remains of ancient columns can be seen and only a few structures. The entrance fee is only 2euros or free with the combo Acropolis ticket (12e including also Acropolis, Ancient Agora, Kerameikos, Temple of Zeus, Harian’s Library) so you can get around and check the place.

    At one side stands the Gate of Athena Archegetis (pic 2) that was built in 11BC with four doric columns and was dedicated of course to the great patroness goddess of the Athenians.

    There’s also Fethiye mosque(pic 3) that was built in 1458 just after the ottoman conquest of the Duchy of Athens. It was built over the ruins of a byzantine church. From 1834 until early 20th century it was used as a military bakery and later as storage place for the archaeological excavations in the area.

    One of my favourite monuments on the Roman agora is the Tower of the Winds that lies at the other side of the Agora behind the mosque(pics 4-5). We use to call it just “Aerides”(winds) but it is also known as “Horologion(timepiece) of Andronicos” (the Macedonian astronomer that build it around 50BC). The tower was excavated by the Greek Archaeological Society in 1845. Before that time it was partly buried in the ground and in early Christian times was used as the bell tower of a church!

    The octagonal tower is made by pentelic marble, its high is 12m, it has a diameter of 8m, with a Doric interior, Corinthian exterior and originally was topped by a revolving bronze weather vane depicting Triton that had a wand in his hand indicated the direction from which the wind was blowing! What’s more, there was a water clock(that’s why it’s also called horologion) in the interior of the tower supplied by water coming from the Acropolis.

    In each side you can see a sculpted figure of the eight winds (in ancient Greece the winds were Gods that had divine powers):
    Borias (N, He blows the cold north wind through a large shell),
    Kaikias (NE, He throws a basket of hailstones),
    Evrus (E, An old man with beard is wrapped in a cloak),
    Apeliotis (SE, A man bringing fruits and grain),
    Notos (S, Bearer of rain, he empties a pot of water),
    Lips (SW, He holds the stern of a ship, promising a good sailing wind),
    Zephyros (W, A young man scattering flowers),
    Skiron (NW, He scatters glowing ashes from a bronze vessel)

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    The Agora Museum

    by Paul2001 Written Nov 16, 2004

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    The Agora Museum

    While visiting the Ancient Agora it is important to visit the superb museum. Located in the reconstructed Stoa of Attalus II, it houses a strong collection of artifacts that have been found on the Agora itself. The original building was built in the 2nd century B.C. It sort of a market where merchants sold food stuffs. Eventually the Stoa became the centre of political and intellectual life in Athens.
    The museum is open when the rest of the Agora is. Entrance is included with the price of admission to the Agora.

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  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Tower of the Winds

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Jul 23, 2008

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    Athens - Tower of the Winds
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    The Tower of the Winds is an octagonal marble tower on the Roman agora. It was supposedly built around 50 BC. The 12 m tall structure has a diameter of about 8 m and was topped in antiquity by a weathervane-like Triton that indicated the wind direction.

    Below the frieze depicting the eight wind deities — Boreas (N), Kaikias (NE), Eurus (E), Apeliotes (SE), Notus (S), Lips (SW), Zephyrus (W), and Skiron (NW) — there are nine sundials.

    You may watch my high resolution photo of Athens on the Google Earth according to the following coordinates 37º 58' 26.26" N 23º 43' 36.67" E or on my Google Earth Panoramio Tower of the Winds .

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  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Ancient Agora

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Jul 23, 2008

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    Athens - Ancient Agora

    The agora in Athens again became a residential area during Roman and Byzantine times.

    You may find here the following sights:
    Peristylar Court, Mint, Enneacrounos, South stoa, Heliaea, Strategeion, Colonos Agoraios, Tholos, Agora stone, Monument of the Eponymous Heroes, Metroon (Old Bouleuterion), New Bouleuterion, Temple of Hephaestus (Hephaestion), Temple of Apollo Patroos, Stoa of Zeus, Altar of the Twelve Gods, Stoa Basileios (Royal stoa), Temple of Aphrodite Urania, Stoa of Hermes, Stoa poikile.

    You may watch my high resolution photo of Athens on the Google Earth according to the following coordinates 37º 58' 20.25" N 23º 43' 34.14" E or on my Google Earth Panoramio Ancient Agora .

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    Naos Hefaistou

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Jul 24, 2008

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    Athens - Naos Hefaistou

    The Temple of Hephaestus ('Theseion') is very well-preserved externally. Its construction considered to begin in 449 BC. It was converted into a church by the Byzantine Greeks. The plan has a distinctive arrangement the east porch being aligned with the third columns on the flanks. As in the Parthenon over the porch the Doric frieze is replaced by a continuous Ionic frieze.

    You may watch my high resolution photo of Athens on the Google Earth according to the following coordinates 37º 58' 20.25" N 23º 43' 34.14" E or on my Google Earth Panoramio Naos Hefaistou .

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  • Jim_Eliason's Profile Photo

    Roman Agora

    by Jim_Eliason Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Roman Agora
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    Built by comission of Julius Ceasar and Augustus from 19 to 11 BC it was later improved by Hadrian. The most famous structure of the agora is the perfectly preserved Tower of the Winds which is thought to predate the agora and to have been used by the astronomer Andronicus from about 150 BC.

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    Romaiki Agora

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Jul 23, 2008

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    Athens - Romaiki Agora

    The Roman Forum of Athens is located to the north of the acropolis and to the east of the original classical Greek agora.

    You may see here the following sights: Tower of the Winds, Gate of Athena Archegetis, East Propylon, Fethiye Djami, Agoranomion and Vespasianae (latrines).

    You may watch my high resolution photo of Athens on the Google Earth according to the following coordinates 37º 58' 26.41" N 23º 43' 33.99" E or on my Google Earth Panoramio Romaiki Agora .

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  • littlesam1's Profile Photo

    Athens - The Ancient Agora

    by littlesam1 Updated Jun 11, 2007

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    Athough not a photogenic as The Acropolis, the Ancient Agora still holds many treasures to see. From the Temple of Haephastus which I wrote about in a previous tip to these large statues of Giants and Tritons the Ancient Agora has much to be seen. These statues are part of The Odeion of Agrippa. The statues date to the year 150 A.D. The second picture here is a long shot of the Ancient Agora.

    The Ancient Agora was originally a market place and also the political and administrative center of Ancient Athens. many social, commercial, and religious events took place here.

    The admission ticket to The Parthenon allows you to enter The Ancient Agora. We also found out that there is no admission charged on Sundays.

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  • Jim_Eliason's Profile Photo

    Ancient (greek ) Agora

    by Jim_Eliason Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Ancient (greek ) Agora
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    This is the old market place that dates back to the city -state time of Athens. This area was the heart of civic life in ancient Athens and dates back to 6th century BC. The site is large and has many ruins and a museum on the site. The best preserved of which is the temple of Hephaistos.

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    Roman Agora

    by xaver Written Jun 16, 2011

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    tower of the winds
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    In the Roman Agora, the tower of the wind is one of the few ancient buildings and ancient clocks that stands almost intact.
    This is a An octagonal marble structure with a conical roof and was built by the astronomer Andronicus from Macedonia in the middle of the 1st century BC.

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