Day Trip to Corinth, Athens

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  • Wide Mind
    Wide Mind
    by starstudio
  • Overview & AkroCorinth to Background
    Overview & AkroCorinth to Background
    by starstudio
  • Roman Baths
    Roman Baths
    by starstudio
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    Daily trip to Ancient Corinth

    by starstudio Updated Apr 15, 2009

    Many day trippers from Athens arrived by the mid-morning and return before sun down. These fascinating ruins are worthy of a full day's exploration so consider bedding down for the night in the attractive village of Ancient Corinth which lies seven kilometers south west of the city of Corinth. The great monolithic -remains- of Apollo;s temple is the breathless attraction!!!

    The archaeological site of Ancient Corinth, located 81 kilometres south west of Athens, is one of the most popular day excursions from the Greek capital. The ruins of this once magnificent city are spread over a vast area and ongoing excavations since 1896 have uncovered extensive remains of the former capital of Roman Greece. As far back as the 5th century BC, the city was one of the richest, most powerful and vice-ridden cities of ancient Greece. The site lies at the base of the imposing Acrocorinth, a 575-metre mass of limestone rock with the remains of a fortress which was among the most forbidding and impregnable strongholds in Greece.

    The city's strategic location at the crossroads between the Peloponnese and northern Greece and the eastern and western Mediterranean made it a prime target for successive invaders over the centuries. In turn it suffered periods of great glory and terrible turmoil.


    The site of Ancient Corinth was first inhabited in the Neolithic period (5000-3000 B.C.). The peak period of the town, though, started in the 8th century B.C. and lasted until its destruction by the Roman general Mummius in 146 B.C. Representative of its wealth is the Doric temple of Apollo which was built in 550 B.C.

    The city was reinhabited in 44 B.C. and gradually developed again. In 51/52 A.D., Apostle Paul visited Corinth. The centre of the Roman city was organized to the south of the temple of Apollo and included shops, small shrines, fountains, baths and other public buildings.

    The invasion of the Herulians in A.D. 267 , initiated the decline of the city though it remained inhabited for many centuries through successive invasions and destructions, until it was liberated from the Turks in 1822.

    Limited excavations were conducted in 1892 and 1906 by the Archaeological Society of Athens under the direction of A. Skias. The systematic excavations of the area, initiated by the American School of Classical Studies in 1896, are still continuing today and have brought to light the agora, temples, fountains, shops, porticoes, baths and various other monuments. The investigations extended also to the fortress on Acrocorinthos, the prehistoric settlements, the Theatre, the Odeion, the Asklepeion, the cemeteries, the Quarter of the Potters, and other buildings outside the main archaeological site.

    The finds are exhibited in the Archaeological Museum of Ancient Corinth.

    Apollo's Temple Overview & AkroCorinth to Background Roman Baths Colourful Spring Wide Mind
    Related to:
    • School Holidays
    • Museum Visits
    • Historical Travel

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    Corinth Canal

    by mallyak Written Sep 1, 2008

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    The famous Corinth Canal, which separates the Peloponnese from mainland Greece, connects the Gulf of Corinth with the Saronic Gulf. The Corinth Canal, though only completed in the late 19th century, was an idea and dream that’s dates back over 2000 thousand years.

    The strip of land that connects the Peloponnese and mainland Greece is called the “Isthmus”. At it’s narrowest point, it is only 4 miles wide, and in ancient times, one could see from one side to the other.

    This place is not exactly in athens -but on the journey from athens ty the port of Paras

    road approach to the bridge

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    Corinth Canal

    by OiKnow Written Jun 18, 2006

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    The Corinth Canal cuts across an isthmus between Loutraki and Korinthos on the coast road almost directly west of Athens. The cut for the canal is deep in solid rock. There are several bridges across the canal. You can stop on either side and walk out on well protected sidewalks on the bridge. The view is spectacular. Just past the bridge there is a restaurant and gift shop with a nice sized parking lot. For the real adventurer it is possible to bungee jump into the chasm (no thank you!)

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Road Trip

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    Ancient Corinth

    by OiKnow Updated Jun 4, 2006

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    Archeologists have been investigating the site at Corinth for a couple of hundred years and they continue to uncover new relicts each year (the day before we visited an un-explored burial site had been identified.) The site features the remains of a couple of major temples, an agora, and of the base of a fountain (listen carefully water is still rushing down from the mountain and passing through the base of the fountain.) There is a very nice archeological museum included in the tour. I collect glass and I was surprised by a 1500 year old box-molded glass pitcher on display. The surrounding area has many small shops. The admission fee is 6 euros a person. The drive to Corinth from Athens takes you out across the Greek countryside. I would recommend taking the subway or a train out to the outer suburbs, picking up a rental car and making a day trip of this (get a good map before you leave) or taking a bus tour that will take you out and back with probably a stop or two along the way. Corinth is an easy day trip from Athens.

    Remains of the Fountain 5-6 C. BC Glass
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Arts and Culture
    • Archeology

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  • Corinth Canal

    by AsterixSg Written Dec 1, 2004

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    You will pass by this place if you take the Argolis tour or are travelling south-west of Athens to Epidavros.

    The Corinth Canal links the Aegean and the Adriatic seas. Its approx 6 km long and has a water depth of about 8 m. Its around 25 m wide at the water surface.

    Before it was built, ships sailing between the Aegean and Adriatic had to travel about 400 odd kms extra.
    Unfortunately, modern day freighters can't pass through this canal. You can actually take a cruise tour through this canal - I couldn't do it for lack of time.

    Here's a view from the top. If you suffer from vertigo, its better to avoid looking down from the bridge :-)

    There's a small cafe where almost everyone stops to grab a bite or drink Greek coffee. There's a souvenier shop next door too.

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  • ThereAndBack's Profile Photo

    Take a trip to Corinthia and...

    by ThereAndBack Written Aug 26, 2002

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Take a trip to Corinthia and Mycini (pardon my spelling, it is pronounced 'my-sin-ee'). It is a day trip from Athens and well worth the lesson in history and beautiful scenery. Pictured is the landscape on the way to/from Corinthia.

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    Stop at Corinths Canal on the...

    by ribenaberry Written Aug 25, 2002

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    Stop at Corinths Canal on the way back from Mycenae to Athens.
    Fascinating work.. How they just cut through a thin strip of land so ships don't have to travel all the way round the cape. Very amazing coz the sides of the canal are Vertical!

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  • siskina's Profile Photo

    Corinth

    by siskina Updated Sep 29, 2007

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Corinth is situated appr. 100 km from Athens. But canal is one of things you have to see. I have good tip for 1 day trip - from Athens to Corinth and than Lutraki

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    Lutraki

    by siskina Updated Sep 29, 2007

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Small spa near the sea. Tip for trip - lighthouse on the coastline - its a very good place for picnic.

    Lutraki

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