Hadrian's Arch, Athens

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    Hadrian's Gate
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    Arch of Hadrian
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  • Arch of Hadrian
    Arch of Hadrian
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  • egonwegh's Profile Photo

    Hadrian's Arch

    by egonwegh Updated Jun 21, 2015

    Hadrian's Arch. This arch marks the border between the ancient part of Athens and the 'new' town designed by the Roman emperor Hadrian (117-138 AD). In the 18th century, it was also one of the gates in a wall that the Turks built against the attacks of Albanian raiders.

    Athens, Hadrian's Arch Athens, Hadrian's Arch
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    between old and new Athens

    by mindcrime Updated Feb 16, 2015

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    The Arch of Hadrian is a typical roman triumph arch that was the gateway between Acropolis(that is 300m away) and the Temple of Olympian Zeus (you can see what’s left of it at the back side of the arch) and marked the line of the ancient city wall. The arch was built in 131A.D. in honor of the roman emperor Hadrian (76-138) when he visited Athens (he was a great benefactor of the city already). He travelled a lot anyway but he was known as philhellene and he toured through out Greece many times, attending Eleusinian Mysteries and Dionysia.

    The gate was made by Pentelic marble (like most structures in Athens including Parthenon). It’s 18m high in symmetrical design and you can clearly see the Corinthian columns topping the arch.
    For many years it was under construction because the pollution has damaged part of the stone and many were afraid that it’s gonna collapse.

    Anyway back to the gate now, there were two inscriptions written on the gate pointing out the key role of the gate:
    “This is Athens, the ancient city of Theseus”
    "This is the city of Hadrian and not of Theseus"

    I like to pass by the Arch from time to time and even at night it looks nice, that's why sometimes I walk there instead taking a bus to Syntagma square...

    Arch of Hadrian Arch of Hadrian Arch of Hadrian Hadrian's Gate Hadrian's Gate
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    Stop At The Arch of Hadrian

    by hquittner Updated Jun 25, 2011

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    The Arch of Hadrian is at the south end of Leof. Amalia and just south of the National Gardens. The upper part of the arch holds four white marble columns with Corinthian capitals. The Arch was built as the entrance to the city for Hadrian in 132 AD. On a frieze just below the columns there is a saying on each surface, The inscription on the west side reads "This is the city of Hadrian and not of Theseus".

    West Side of Hadrian's Arch East Side of Hadrian's Arch
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  • penny_g's Profile Photo

    The Arch of Hadrian

    by penny_g Updated Nov 26, 2010

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    The arch was built in 131 AD by the Roman emperor Hadrian as part of the wall, separating New and Old Athens. The gate is 18 m. high and decorated after the Corintian style. Hadrian's reign was distinguished by its peaceful years and a lot of time and energy were devoted to construction and arts.

    The arch is located south from the National Garden on Amalias Avenue.

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  • mallyak's Profile Photo

    Arch of Hadrian

    by mallyak Written Aug 22, 2008

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    Emperor Hadrian had the west side of this arch inscribed “This is Athens, the ancient city of Theseus”, and the east side “This is the city of Hadrian and not of Theseus”, distinguishing the cities of ancient legend and modern reality

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  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Arch of Hadrian

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Jul 23, 2008

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    The Arch of Hadrian is a monumental gateway resembling a Roman triumphal arch. It spanned an ancient road from the center of Athens to the complex of structures on the eastern side of the city that included the Temple of Olympian Zeus. It has been proposed that the arch was built to celebrate the arrival of the Roman Emperor Hadrian and to honor him for his many benefactions to the city.

    You may watch my high resolution photo of Athens on the Google Earth according to the following coordinates 37º 58' 12.94" N 23º 43' 54.94" E or on my Google Earth Panoramio Arch of Hadrian .

    Athens - Arch of Hadrian Athens - Arch of Hadrian
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  • apbeaches's Profile Photo

    Hadrian's Arch

    by apbeaches Updated Jul 16, 2008

    The Arch of Hadrian is a monumental gateway resembling – in some respects - a Roman triumphal arch. It spanned an ancient road from the center of Athens to the complex of structures on the eastern side of the city that included the Temple of Olympian Zeus. It has been proposed that the arch was built to celebrate the arrival of the Roman Emperor Hadrian and to honor him for his many benefactions to the city, on the occasion of the dedication of the nearby temple complex in 131 or 132 AD.

    There were two inscriptions on the arch, facing in opposite directions, naming both Theseus and Hadrian as founders of Athens. While it is clear that the inscriptions honor Hadrian, it is uncertain whether they refer to the city as a whole or to the city in two parts: one old and one new. The early idea, however, that the arch marked the line of the ancient city wall, and thus the division between the old and the new regions of the city, has been shown to be false by further excavation. The arch is located 325m southeast of the Acropolis.

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  • littlesam1's Profile Photo

    Athens - Hadrians Arch

    by littlesam1 Updated Jun 11, 2007

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    Hadrians Arch is located near the entrance to The Temple of the Olympic Zeus. The arch was constructed around the year 131 B.C. If you look closely at my picture you will see The Acropolis in the background. There is an interesting inscription on the Arch. According to one reference the side facing the Acropolis has the inscription "This is the city of Theseus" and on the side facing the Temple of Zeus it is inscribed with "This is the city of Hadrian and not of Theseus." I did not know about this when I saw the statue so I did not look for the inscriptions. If you see the Arch check it out and let me know if you see the inscription!

    Hadrians Arch

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    HADRIAN GATE

    by STRATOS79 Updated May 10, 2007

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    The arch of Hadrian was built in 132BC to celebrate the arrival of the roman emperor Hadrian(all the arch was made with pentelic marble).There are two inscriptions on the arch, the first one says This is Athens the ancient city of Theseus and the second This is the city of Hadrian not of Theseus Just beyond the arch is the temple of Olympian Zeus

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  • lashr1999's Profile Photo

    Hadrian’s Arch

    by lashr1999 Written Oct 15, 2005

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    Hadrian’s Arch was built in 132 AD. The arch has some interesting engraving on it. On one side it says,” This is Athens, the ancient city of Theseus”. On the other side it says, “This is the city of Hadran and not of Theseus”. This means if you stand on one side of the arch you were in ancient Athens and if you stood on the other side you were in the modern roman city of Athens.

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  • Hadrians Arch

    by janbeeu Updated Jul 18, 2005

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    Hadrian’s Arch was constructed in 131 AD by the Roman emperor Hadrian as part of a wall separating the old and new cities of Athens. On the side of the arch facing the Acropolis is the inscription, "This is Athens the former city of Theseus," while the other side reads, "This is the city of Hadrian and not of Theseus." The 18 metres gate was made of marble from nearby Mt. Pentelikon and decorated in the Corinthian order.

    Hadrian was known for his peaceful reign and for being an extensive builder. He was very fond of Greek learning and had travelled in Achaea. He also rebuilt the fortification wall around Athens which had been torn down by Sulla and changed the Acropolis into a fort, which it had been before. Athens became somewhat of a second capital during Hadrian’s reign.

    You will find Handrian's Arch at Amallias Avenue at the entrance of the site of the Temple of Olympian Zeus, just south of the National Gardens.

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    Hadrians Arch

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  • Pieter11's Profile Photo

    Hadrian´s Arch

    by Pieter11 Written May 30, 2005

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    Hadrian´s Arch was built in 132 A.D. in order of the former Roman Emperor Hadrian. It used to be a part of a huge wall that devided the old and the new part of Athens. The old part, containing the Acropolis, and the new part containing Hadrian´s masterpieces Temple of Olympic Zeus and the Panathinaic Stadium.

    At the side towards the old part of Athens, there was written on the arch: "This is Athens, the former city of Theseus". And at the other side of the gate there was written: "This is Hadrian´s city, and not Theseus´".

    The gate has an height of 18 metres and is made of the marble taken out the closely situated Pentelus-hill. Some Corinthic pillars are put on top of the gate.

    Hadrian was mad about Athens. He loved the city, he learned Greek history and language, he traveled a lot through ancient Greece and he loved to build in this city. He rebuilt the citywalls that were destroyed by Sulla and gave the city back its protection. Under Hadrian Athens became like a second capital of the Roman Empire.

    Hadrian��s Arch
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  • Paul2001's Profile Photo

    Hadrian's Arch

    by Paul2001 Written Aug 3, 2004

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    Hadrian's Arch is one of the many monuments that the Roman Emperor Hadrian built throughout Athen's during his reign. The arch sits by the Temple of Olympian Zeus and it is more likely that you will pass on the way to the latter monument.
    Viewing of the arch is free as it sits in plain view at the roadside.

    Hadrian's Arch

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  • Jmill42's Profile Photo

    Hadrian's Arch

    by Jmill42 Written Mar 16, 2004

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    Being that Hadrian finished the Temple of Zeus, and the fact that emperors don't usually like to give all the glory to some other person, Hadrian built an arch near the entrance and named it after himself. It was under reconstruction when I was there, but you could still see how impressive the structure is from underneath the scaffolding.

    The arch is free to see, along your way to the Temple of Zeus.

    Hadrian's Arch

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  • amsterdam_vallon's Profile Photo

    Hadrian's Arch

    by amsterdam_vallon Written Dec 28, 2003

    The triumphal arch lies on an ancient street that led from the old city of Athens to the new, Roman section, built by Hadrian. It was constructed by the Athenians in A.D. 131, in honor of their benefactor emperor. Two inscriptions are carved on the architrave, one on each side: the first, on the side towards the Acropolis reads "This is Athens, the ancient city of Theseus"; the second, on the other side, facing the new city reads "This is the city of Hadrian and not of Theseus".

    The central arched opening of the monument is supported by pilasters crowned with Corinthian capitals. Similar, but taller pilasters flank the outer corners. The arch is crowned by a series of Corinthian columns and pilasters, with an Ionic architrave at the ends, and an entablature with a triangular pediment in the middle. The whole monument is made of Pentelic marble.

    Sorry for the pic, it was in restauration...too bad!!

    Hadrian's Arch

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