Lycabettus Hill, Athens

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  • The Funicular up the hill
    The Funicular up the hill
    by LoriPori
  • View of Lycabettus from the Acropolis
    View of Lycabettus from the Acropolis
    by LoriPori
  • Lycabettus Hill
    by rexvaughan
  • Lilasel's Profile Photo

    The favourite spot

    by Lilasel Updated Nov 13, 2004

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    Lycabettus hill

    Lycabettus Hill is approximately 300 metres high and offers a view over the entire city. It is a favourite spot for Athenians and visitors to take a stroll. The summit can be reached via a circular road, pathways or the funicular. On the hill there are two churches: at the foot of the hill, inside a cave, is the small church of Aghios Isidoros, while on the top is the church of Aghios Georgios, dating from 1780. On the summit there is also an open-air theatre, which during the summer holds various cultural events.

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  • LoriPori's Profile Photo

    ATHENS HIGHEST POINT - LYCABETTUS HILL

    by LoriPori Updated Jun 21, 2007

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    View of Lycabettus from the Acropolis
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    An absolute must do in Athens is watch the sunset from the top of LYCABETTUS HILL or Mount Likavitos. That is exactly what was planned for Friday night's VT get-together. Only, the sun didn't co-operate and it was rainy and overcast. But it was pure joy to see some of our old VT friends. I was looking at the Parthenon and suddenly I could hear clip clop of sandals running towards me. I turned around and it was Carmen (Carmela71). We gave each other huge hugs. It was so good to see her again and of course Stace (Beachdog).
    There is a restaurant at the top with indoor and outdoor seating.
    The hill is higher than the Acropolis so you are able to actually look down on the Parthenon. On a good day you have wonderful views of Athens. Piraeus and the Saronic Gulf. Awesome!
    There is also the small Chapel of St. George (Agios Georgios ) which was open and we were able to look inside.
    We came up via the funicular, which leaves from the top of Odos Ploutarchou every 20 minutes. The funicular costs 5.50 Euros per person.

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  • xaver's Profile Photo

    Panorama

    by xaver Written Jun 16, 2011

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    panorama
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    This is one of the sites in Athens where you get the best view over the city. How do you get up there? Take the metro untill Evangelismos stop, get out and go left untill you see a road on your right, then cross and go up. Continue going straight on untill the steps begins, then you'll have to do 196 of them, fortunatly there are some seats to rest on the way. At the end you find the funicular that will take you up the holl and back for 7€.
    The funicular leaves any 30 minuts.
    If you do njot want to walk much take a taxi to the funicular.

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  • mindcrime's Profile Photo

    great views of the city

    by mindcrime Updated Apr 21, 2013

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    Lycabetus Hill

    Like in Istanbul there are seven hills in Athens, the Acropolis is the most famous but Lycabettus is the tallest one.

    Oh, what sweet memories I have from this hill! I used to live in close distance, that's why many times I went up there just for the sunset over the city. Don’t miss the chance and spend some hours to visit the hill.
    You can climp the stairs or take the funicular but I always walk up even during high heat (not recommended). The hill that goes up to 270m is great for wonderful views over the city of Athens (and Acropolis of course) and on a clear day you can see far to the sea! It is also a nice spot for concerts because there is an open air theatre where many artists give performances every year. I have seen Ray Davies, Nick Cave, Dream Theater, Kansas, Blackmore’s Night and so many others…

    At the top you can visit the chapel of Agios Georgios (built in the 19th century over a previus byzantine church Profitis Ilias). There is also a restaurant/café on your way up. If you see Lycabetus hill from a distance during the night you will notice the lights on it but it’s also nice during the day because it’s covered with pine trees.

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  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Mount Lycabettus

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Jul 23, 2008

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    Athens - Mount Lycabettus
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    Mount Lycabettus is a hill which can be seen from everywhere in Athens. It rises 277 meters above sea level and is the highest point in the city that surrounds it. Pine trees cover its base, and at its peak you may see the 19th century Chapel of St. George.

    Lycabettus appears in various legends. Popular stories suggest it was once the refuge of wolves, possibly the origin of its name (which means "the one (the hill) that is walked by wolves"). Mythologically, Lycabettus is credited to Athena, who created it when she dropped a mountain she had been carrying for the construction of the Acropolis after the box holding Erichthonius was opened.

    You may watch my high resolution photo of Athens on the Google Earth according to the following coordinates 37º 58' 18.48" N 23º 43' 40.65" E or on my Google Earth Panoramio Mount Lycabettus.

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  • Sharon's Profile Photo

    Lycabettus Hill

    by Sharon Written Apr 10, 2004

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    Okay i assume saying its a must see would be somehow funny, you won't be able to miss it anyway !
    This Mount or hill is rising from the neighborhood of Kolonaki and with the Hilton and the Athens Tower at Ambelokipi in the distance.
    I loved this hill, almost where ever i was i could see it, changing with the changing of lights and so Lovely at night !

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  • Jmill42's Profile Photo

    Lycabettus (Lykavittos) Hill

    by Jmill42 Updated Mar 16, 2004

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    After dusk on Mt Lycabettus

    Mt Lycabettus is one of the two hills on either side of the Acropolis that give great vantage points to take pictures and enjoy the one-of-a-kind view that Athens offers. Sitting high above the city, away from its noise and business, this is a great place to soak it all in. While I prefer Mt Filopappos , for its quieter atmosphere, Lycabettus offers, not only the view, but a funicular ride, restaurant, and small chapel. There are many more tourists here, especially at sunset, but it was a great atmosphere and a great memory.

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  • Jmill42's Profile Photo

    Lycabettus Funicular and Metro

    by Jmill42 Written Mar 16, 2004

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    My Funicular Ride

    When you decide you want to visit the top of Mt Lycabettus, you can chose to walk or to ride the funicular. I chose to ride up, not in small part because the walk up to the beginning of the ride from the metro is a pretty big hike up the hill. Or, maybe I am a whimp. Either way, I was seating profusely when I arrived and passed over the first ride so that my sweat glands could calm down and recover. Nice image, right?

    Anyway, the ride will cost you 5 Euro, or chose the hike up the side of the mountain. Truthfully, it probably not that hard, I was just being lazy with the heat. I did walk down the mountain after the sun had set and it was a pleasurable walk.

    The closest metro station is Evangelismos. From there, you just start walking up the hill and signs will guide you either to the path or funicular ride.

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  • TheView's Profile Photo

    Restaurant with a view

    by TheView Written Apr 7, 2006

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    1 more image

    As the highest hill of Athens here you can have a fantastic view for your dinner in the nigthtime Athens just looks more at peace with it self. The restaurant is fine and offers good food it is twice as expensive as normale restaurants in the city but a precious way to say goodbye to a wonderful city.

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  • belgrade03's Profile Photo

    Lycabettus hill

    by belgrade03 Written Oct 25, 2003

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    St. George church at Lycabettus hill

    There is a phenomenal view of modern Athens from the top of the Lycabettus hill which is crowned with the small St. George church. You can get there by stairs or much faster by a cable car that costs 6 euros (if my memory serves me) for a two way trip. There is a nice caffe at the top offering various refreshments.

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  • lina112's Profile Photo

    Lycabettus

    by lina112 Written May 3, 2005

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    Is the highest hill of Athens (277m) and offers a fantastic view of Athens. There´s two ways to get the hill, walking til the top of the hill or go walking to Ploutarhou street and take the funicular in aristippou str. The nice little chapel of St. George and the theater in the north of the hill, make it specially attractive. There´s a restaurant at the top of the hill where you can enjoy a lunch, dinner, a drink or a coffee.

    The picture was taken from Acropolis.

    The funicular´s return ticket cost 4.50 euros.
    If you walking by Ploutarhou street and suddenly you see policemen round it don´t scary, the brittish embasy is there.

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  • Crift's Profile Photo

    The area around Lycabetus hill

    by Crift Updated Oct 8, 2003

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    Kolonaki square

    Of course, you should take the funicular to the top of the hill for a magnificent view of the city but there is more to see for the enquiring eye around the hill.

    On the southern slope of the hill lies the Kolonaki area with its famous square (platia). This is the most expensive area in the city and hosts most of the label boutiques, etc. For something different, take an hour off from sightseeing, have a cup of coffee in one of the cafes around the square and check out the snobs and the wannabe's!

    Moving east from Kolonaki towards the Exarchia square and the Archaeological museum, we enter another territory. It belongs to the students of the Higher or Academic education, the book-keepers and book editors, the "intellectuals" and the anarchists. Exarchia has its square too, not much really, again lots of cafes but hosting a more alternative crowd. Some junky punks wonder around like zombies, occasionally begging for money, but that's all. This area should be avoided around the 17th of November because of the riots that take place during these days.

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  • leics's Profile Photo

    Go up the hill.........

    by leics Written Apr 25, 2009

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    Ayios Yeoryios
    3 more images

    From the top you will get excellent views of the city, and can clearly see how far Athens spreads.

    The Acropolis and other hills stand out like green islands in a sea of concrete, encircled by the distant mountains.

    You can get up the hill by using the funicular (which is in a tunnel, so no views from here) or you can walk up. It runs every half and hour or so from Odhis Aristipou (you'll need to climb hill and/or steps to get there).

    You could also walk up. There is a snake-like paved path from near the funicular entrance (to the left, as you face the funicular). With hindsight, I should have chosen to take the funicular up and then walked down.

    On top of the hill is a restaurant (you have to walk through its patio area from the funicular) and on the very top is the chapel of Ayios Yeoryios. It's whitewashed, and pretty, but not very old........probably dates from the 19th century.

    It's worth a wander up the hillif you have the time to spare (and it could be very romantic at night, I suspect) but it was quite busy when I visited in early April. Don't expect to have the summit to yourself!

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  • Pieter11's Profile Photo

    Lykavitos

    by Pieter11 Written Jun 29, 2005

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    Acropolis seen from Lykavittos
    2 more images

    The hill of Lykavitos (or Lykabettos) is the highest point of the city of Athens. It reachest to a height of 277 metres above sealevel. This used to be the natural boundary of the city, but because of the enormous growth throughout the years, its now completely surrounded by concrete.

    From the top you have a stunning view al over the city, both by day and by night. From the bottom of the hill you can take a cable track to the top at daytime, but there is also a possiblity of climbing the mountain on foot. I took the best way up: by car...

    At the top there is an old 19th century chapel called Agios Georgios. Right behind this chapel there is a terrace that gives you the best view of Athens you can wish for. Finally there is also a restaurant and bar, just a level lower, where you can drink the `highest´ beer Athens has to offer.

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  • Boomscat's Profile Photo

    View from the top

    by Boomscat Updated Jun 28, 2007

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    This is the best view of Athens and Acropolis. Go about an hour before the sunset. I went at about 10pm and the view was magnificent but my camera couldn't take good pics at night. Locals recommend going at around 7pm and watch the sun go down. On the top of the hill there are several cafes and a restaurant.

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