Museum of Cycladic Art, Athens

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  • Cypriot art, Museum of Cycladic Art, Athens
    Cypriot art, Museum of Cycladic Art,...
    by iblatt
  • Goulandris Museum of Cycladic Art, Athens
    Goulandris Museum of Cycladic Art,...
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  • Goulandris Museum of Cycladic Art, Athens
    Goulandris Museum of Cycladic Art,...
    by iblatt
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    Goulandris Museum of Cycladic Art: 4th Floor

    by iblatt Written Nov 22, 2010

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    Did you know that "symposium" in ancient Athens actually meant relaxing and drinking wine in company? Or that Athenians drank their wine diluted with water, and only Dionysos was served neat, undiluted wine? Or that after bathing their bodies, athletes rubbed their skin with oil and then with dust in order to suppress body odors and control perspiration?

    The 4th floor of the Goulandris Museum of Cycladic Art is dedicated to "Scenes from Daily Life in Antiquity". Short films demonstrate customs and rituals associated with birth, education, sports, military training, public affairs, marriage and going to war, and death. The other displays contain pictorial depictions of daily life and authentic ancient artefacts (from the Classical and Hellenistic periods) used in daily life activities.

    The exhibition units are divided according to themes: Gods and Heros, On the Wings of Eros, Toiletry and Wedding, Women's Activities, Athletics, Symposium, In the Athenian Agora, Warfare, Taking Care of the Deceased.

    This is a very interesting and didactic exhibition, easy to follow, and refreshing after visiting 3 floors of archaeology and art.

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    Goulandris Museum of Cycladic Art: 3rd Floor

    by iblatt Updated Nov 20, 2010

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    Cypriot twin-neck jugs, Museum of Cycladic Art
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    The third floor of the museum (in the Dora Goulandris Wing) is dedicared to ancient Cypriot art.
    A world-renowned collection of Cypriot art, the Zintillis Collection, is on display here since 2004. There are several hundred artifacts of stone, clay, bronze, silver, gold and glass, dating from the Chalcolithic period to the Byzantine period.

    The twin-neck jugs are unusual vessels from the early Bronze Age (2500-2300 BC). They probably originate from a small number of potteries around Limassol. Red colored, with a peculiar complex shape, they are decorated with incised or punctured motifs with white chalk infill (see photo). Their original use is unclear: Did they serve for ritual or ceremonial functions?

    Other unusual exhibits are the "plank-shaped figurines", anthropomorphic terracotta or stone stattuettes from 2000-1800 BC (see other photo). Were they originally painted, or covered with fabric and jewellery? There is a lot of room for imagination!

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    Goulandris Museum of Cycladic Art: 2nd Floor

    by iblatt Updated Nov 17, 2010
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    The second floor of the Goulandris Museum of Cycladic Art deals with the history of Greek society from 2000 BC to the 4th century AD. Social and political developments are outlined as reflected in ancient Greek art.

    An example which impressed me was the development of female sensuality in art; in earlier times the male body was adored and displayed in the nude, and only centuries later a more sensual female figure emerged, exemplified by the Tanagra statuettes (see photo). Although women appeared dressed and not nude in ancient Greek sculptures, the artists did not fail to show every curve of the female body (see other photo).

    Besides statues and figurines there are various kinds of vases and vessels, including the unusual vessel with a lid crowned by four horses (see photo).

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    Goulandris Museum of Cycladic Art: Introduction

    by iblatt Updated Nov 17, 2010

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    Goulandris Museum of Cycladic Art: Entrance
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    Aikaterini (Dolly) and Nicholaos Goulandris began collecting Greek antiquities in the early 1960s. The collection grew over the years, and after Nicholaos's death (1985) Dolly Goulandris donated it to a non-profit foundation which she set up for this purpose.
    The Museum of Cycladic Art was opened to the public in 1986, and now contains over 3000 artifacts of Cycladic, ancient Greek and Cypriot art.

    The main building is the Dolly Goulandris Wing, which is entered deom Neofytou Douka, a small side street off Vas. Sofias. This wing has four floors, which are home to the permanent collection. Temporary exhibitions are shown in the two-floor Stathatos Mansion, on Vas. Sofias. The two buildings are connected by a passageway.

    The Museum of Cycladic Art is a must for every art lover; the displays are excellent and the explanations clear and didactic, with an appeal to evryone.

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    Museum of Cycladic Art: Stathatos Mansion

    by iblatt Written Nov 15, 2010

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    Stathatos Mansion, Museum of Cycladic Art

    The Goulandris Museum of Cycladic Art consists of two separate buildings, connected by a glass-roofed passageway. The Stathatos Mansion is the older building of the two, a beautiful neo-classical house designed by the Bavarian architect Ernst Ziller in 1895. Its exterior can be viewed from Vas. Sofias Street.

    The Stathatos Mansion houses the temporary exhibitions of the museum. During my visit the exhibition was dedicated to the relationship between the ancient Greek civilization and a very ancient Eastern European civilization which apparently existed in the Danube valley and the Balkans about 5000 years ago. This was all new to me, and some of the exhibits were tatntalizing.

    The architecture of this mansion per se is worth the visit. The same entrance ticket for the main building (the Dora Goulandris Wing) also covers the Stathatos Mansion.

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    Goulandris Museum of Cycladic Art: 1st Floor

    by iblatt Updated Nov 14, 2010

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    Marble figurine, Museum of Cycladic Art, Athens
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    My guidebook promised "mesmerizing marble figurines" and "enigmatic exhibits" in the Goulandris Museum of Cycladic Art, so I entered the exhibition on the first floor with high expectations, yet not knowing quite what to expect. Will I get mesmerized by a 5000 year old figurine?

    In the dark hall and cooridors, plates in Greek and in English introduced me to the strange, ancient, remote Cycladic civilization. It developed in the Cyclades during the early bronze age (3200-3000 BC). This culture was different from any other, developing on secluded islands by seafarers who did have contacts with other communities on the Aegean. They lived in fragmented communities with few natural resources. One thing they had a lot of was marble, and they did use it to the best advantage.

    Most of the figurines belong to the "cannonical type", usually female, with arms folded on the chest, few facial and other anatomical landmarks. Their size varies from a few centimeters to full size. Yes, I was mesmerized by these figures. There was something haunting and mysterious about them, and every visitor seemed to feel this. I went around them again and again, took photographs from different angles, as if I was expecting them to reveal their secret. They look surprisingly modern in their semi-abstraction, and then you realize that they are over 5000 years old, or 2500 years older than the classical works of Athens in its golden age...

    The illumination in the museum brings the best of these figurines, and the English explanations are perfect: not too long and not too short, clear and readable.

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    MUSEUM OF CYCLADIC ART

    by STRATOS79 Written Apr 18, 2007

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    Goulandris museum of Cycladic art was made in 1986 to promote
    the ancient Greek art (Cycladic art unknown to many people)
    covering from the 2nd millennium BC until
    today. There is also a complete Cypriot collection which is the
    second largest in the world

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  • Museum - The Museum of Cycladic Art

    by janbeeu Updated Jul 19, 2005

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    The

    The Museum of Cycladic Art is devoted to the study and promotion of ancient Greek art. It was founded in 1986 in order to house the collection of Cycladic and ancient Greek art belonging to Nicholas and Dolly Goulandris. The exhibition includes artefacts from the bronze age 2000 BC through to the late Roman period 4th Century AD.

    The museum's centrepiece, the Cycladic collection, is shown on the st floor. The collection of ancient Greek art is housed on the 2nd floor of the main building. The 3rd floor is a venue for small-scale temporary exhibits while, at the same time, it serves as lecture theatre where the museum's lecture series takes place during the academic year (October to May).

    The main room on the 4th floor houses the Charles Politis collection, a representative collection of Greek artefacts donated to the Museum of Cycladic Art by its owner, Rita Politis, in 1989. The rest of the floor is occupied by the museum's study collection, consisting of a artefacts from diverse periods.

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    The museum of Cycladic Art

    by athenian80 Updated Apr 13, 2005

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    The Stath��tos mansion and some cycladic figur

    The museum of Cycladic Art has one of the best collections of cycladic art in the world. As I did with Benaki museum I visited this excellent museum only a few months ago. This museum is divided in two wings: The four-storey building at Neofitou Douka street and the neoclassical Stathatos mansion at Irodotou and Vassilis Sofias street. The former wing is actually the main part of the museum with the collection of the enigmatic cycladic figurines displayed in the first floor and ancient Greek art in the second floor. In the third floor there are hosted temporary exhibitions. When I visited it there where displayed items from the cultures of the central Asian grasslands. In the fourth floor there is the Politis collection. I think the highlight is the collection of the ancient helmets. So many styles and shapes! The neoclassical mansion is linked with the main building with an arcade. There at the side of the main building you’ll find a nice café. The interior of the mansion is pretty impressive and gives you a taste of Athens in the 19th century. I would recommend you to begin your visit from the neoclassical building.

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    The Museum of Cycladic Art

    by AndyRG Updated May 27, 2003

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    A common figure...

    It is one of the best private museums in Greece. The Museum of Cycladic Art (The Nicholas P. Goulandris Foundation) was founded in 1986.
    It has to do mainly with the cycladic civilization, which was grown up in Cyclades, a cluster of islands in central Aegean Sea, between 3200-2000 BC.

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    The Museum of Cycladic Art II

    by AndyRG Written Dec 4, 2002

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    The museum has an excellent cycladic collection, it contains more than 350 objects. They are representative of every phase of this great civilization, one of the oldest of the world. Various artists as Modigliani, Henry Moor, Picasso have been influenced by the beauty and the style of the cycladic art...
    A collection of ancient greek art (pottery, coins, sculptures, jewellery) and the Charles Politis collection can be also admired there.

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    'MUSEUM OF CYCLADIC ART'...

    by tak_pap Written Sep 7, 2002

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    'MUSEUM OF CYCLADIC ART' :

    The Museum of Cycladic Art is devoted to the study and promotion of ancient Greek art. It was founded in 1986 in order to house the collection of Cycladic and Ancient Greek art belonging to Nicholas and Dolly Goulandris. Starting in the early Sixties, and with a permit by the Greek State, the couple collected Greek antiquities, with special interest in the prehistoric art from the Cycladic islands.

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    Museum of Cycladic art

    by Jim_Eliason Written Dec 8, 2005

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    Museum of Cycladic art
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    This museum focus is on the pre-historic art from the Cyclade islands and other proto-greek societies. Its a rather small museum but worth a visit.

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    Cycladic Art Museum

    by lina112 Written May 8, 2005

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    Over 1.000 objects of Cycladic and ancient Greek art are displayed on the three floors of the museum.
    The museum has one of the most important collections fo cycladic art worldwide.

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    Museum of Cycladic Art

    by mardaska Written Apr 8, 2003

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    Figurines from the Cycladic Collection

    One of the most important museums in Athens. It was founded in order to house the collection of Cycladic and Ancient Greek art belonging to Nicholas and Aikaterini Goulandris.

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