Philopappos Hill and Monument, Athens

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  • Summit of Philopappou Hill, Athens
    Summit of Philopappou Hill, Athens
    by iblatt
  • Philipappou from the Acropolis
    Philipappou from the Acropolis
    by mikey_e
  • Philopappos Hill and Monument
    by littlesam1
  • AcornMan's Profile Photo

    Philopappos Hill

    by AcornMan Written Apr 30, 2004

    Philopappos Hill is south of the Plaka and Monastiraki areas and can be seen easily from atop the Acropolis. The hill took it name from the funeral monument built at its top in 115 A.D in memory of Gaius Julius Antiochus Philopappos, who was a Roman consul. The monument was 10 meters high with statues of the family of Filopappos. The hill is pine-covered and the top offers visitors panoramic views over Athens, the acropolis and the Saronic Gulf. It is only accessible by foot. The hill also houses the small Byzantine chapel of Agios Dimitrios which contains some fine frescoes.

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  • Jmill42's Profile Photo

    Philopappos Hill

    by Jmill42 Written Mar 16, 2004

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The View Atop Mt Philopappos

    This hill got its name from the monument on its peak. The monument was built to in 115 A.D as a memorial to Gaius Julius Antiochus Philopappos who was a Roman leader of the day. The monument contains staues of Filopappos and his family.

    Alos on the hill, there is the small Byzantine chapel of Agios Dimitrios which some really detailed frescoes.

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  • Jmill42's Profile Photo

    Philopappos (Filopappos) Hill

    by Jmill42 Written Mar 16, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The View of Acropolis and Lycabettus in background

    Given my choice, I would chose to climb up Mt Filopappos Hill for a view of Athens, rather than Lycabettus. It has a wonderful rock outcropping down from the monument that gives a wonderful, quiet, serene view over the Acropolis and city. As with all hills, there is a bit of a climb. Once again, Filopappos wins over Lycabettus, as you begin your walk in a park and wind along a tree-lined path up to the scenic outlook or monument further up the hill.

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  • amsterdam_vallon's Profile Photo

    Philopappos Monument

    by amsterdam_vallon Updated Dec 29, 2003
    Philopappos Monument

    The monument of Philopappos is dated to 114-116 A.D. It was erected by the Athenians in honor of the great benefactor of their city, the exiled prince of Commagene, Julius Antiochus Philopappos who settled in Athens, became a citizen and assumed civic and religious offices. According to Pausanias, the monument was built on the same site where Mousaios was formerly buried.

    The monument measures 9.80 x 9.30 m. and contains the burial chamber. It is built of white Pentelic marble on a socle 3.08 m. high, made of poros stone and veneered with slabs of Hymettian marble. The north side of the monument, which was visible from the Acropolis, was the facade, and beared lavish architectural decoration. The monument was preserved almost intact as late as the 15th century A.D. when Cyriacus of Ancona visited the site and copied the five inscriptions on the facade. The three inscriptions below the statues record the names of the persons represented. The central figure is Philopappos, son of Epiphanes, on the left is Antiochus, son of king Antiochus, and on the right was king Seleucus Nicator, son of Antiochus.

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  • AndyRG's Profile Photo

    The monument on Philopappou hill

    by AndyRG Updated May 27, 2003

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    It was built by the Athenians around 114-115 AD, in honor of the benefactor of Athens Antiochus Philopappos. The monument was built of the famous white pentelic marble. The place offers a perfect view of the Acropolis.

    Related to:
    • Archeology

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  • ChrsStrl's Profile Photo

    The Philopappos Monument

    by ChrsStrl Written May 11, 2003
    The monument

    Built 114AD to honour this prince of northern Syria, Athenian citizen and Roman consul and praetor, it was originally a concave facade surmounting a rectangular tomb, although it is no longer complete. The Blue Guide speaks lovingly of the view at sunset from here, and one hopes that if the air becomes cleaner the Saronic Gulf will be seen more often!

    Related to:
    • Archeology
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

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  • ChrsStrl's Profile Photo

    Climb Philopappos for the view and monument

    by ChrsStrl Written May 11, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The view from the monument

    In the pine forest area away from the bustle of the crowd is the hill which is crowned by the Monument to Philopappos. Few people come here yet the view of the Parthenon is excellent and it is a haven far from the madding crowd that you can watch milling on the Acropolis itself.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology

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  • cfuentesm's Profile Photo

    Philoppapus Monument

    by cfuentesm Updated Oct 20, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Philoppapus Monument

    This monument was created in honor of the great benefactor of their city Julius Antiochus Philopappos. It's one of the most amazing sites I found around Athens.

    Related to:
    • Archeology
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

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  • parsix's Profile Photo

    FLOWERS

    by parsix Updated Aug 4, 2003

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    popis flowers

    This is perfect scenary for those people who draw water colours... Every time I pass by this spot I had to stop and contemplate it.

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