Philopappos Hill and Monument, Athens

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  • Summit of Philopappou Hill, Athens
    Summit of Philopappou Hill, Athens
    by iblatt
  • Philipappou from the Acropolis
    Philipappou from the Acropolis
    by mikey_e
  • Philopappos Hill and Monument
    by littlesam1
  • janetanne's Profile Photo

    Let the Beauty Be Forever Standing!

    by janetanne Updated Jan 24, 2006

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    Phillopopos' Perfect Perspective

    This picture was taken on a cold winter's day in January 2006, when the light was perfect. 4pm, when they were throwing people off the monument; early winter hours, guards anxious to find their ways down the winding paths of Plaka, on their way to a warm dish of hot Athenian food? We were the last to linger; waiting for the perfect light...the sliver of light that was slipping through the cloud as it sank into the the shining waters on the horizon. The sea looked like a mirror, reflecting the 'old' new sunlight as it flooded the Earth once again; The light shone on this sacred ancient monument. Captured on a digital space; transferred to the internet grid; viewed by anonymous virtual tourist for unmeasurable light years away. The epitomy of Athens, the old mingled with the new; forever changing; forever the same. Save the Earth for these precious visions. Respect our heritage and those who strived to create a lasting beauty. Join the Quest for Peace on this Earth. Rebuild the fallen monuments and make our unity as 'one' nation of 'human beings' forever lasting.

    Terrorism tears apart our 'hearts' and leaves only tears.

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  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Filopapou Hill

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Jul 24, 2008

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    Athens - Filopapou Monument
    1 more image

    The Philopappos Monument is the tomb of a member of the royal family of a small Hellenistic kingdom in southeastern Turkey and northern Syria. The Roman emperor Vespasian annexed the kingdom to the Roman Empire and the royal family was sent into exile. Philopappos lived in Athens and became an Athenian citizen.

    Since the Athenians allowed him to be buried in this very elaborate mausoleum right opposite the Acropolis because he was an important benefactor of the ancient city of Athens.

    You may watch my high resolution photo of Athens on the Google Earth according to the following coordinates 37º 58' 16.38" N 23º 43' 9.98" E or on my Google Earth Panoramio Filopapou Hill.

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  • littlesam1's Profile Photo

    Athens - View from Hill of the Muses

    by littlesam1 Updated Jun 12, 2007

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    2 more images

    I decided to break down the tips on Philopappos hill into two tips because finding the monument on the top is only part of the pleasure of this hill. The hill itself allows you one of the best views of the Acropolis from anywhere in the city. I took these pictures from the hill. Its a beautiful walk to the top. I did not read a lot about this hill in any of the guide books and only found it because it was close to my hotel. There were no crowds on the paths. The tourists are all over on the Acropolis. There were a few people walking their dogs and just a couple of tourists on the afternoon I climbed the hill. There is no admission charge to enter the park. However it does look like the park is closed and not open to the public when you approach it. There was rope across the path looking like you should not enter. But it is open to the public and well worth a few minutes just for the view of the city and the Acropolis alone.

    If you tired, and need to escape go to this hill and get in touch with the Muses. Its a great break from the crowds.

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  • mindcrime's Profile Photo

    I guess he had a lot of money...!

    by mindcrime Updated Jun 2, 2009

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    the Philopapos hill
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    As you’ll enjoy the view from Acropolis you will notice at South West of the Acropolis the greenery Philopapos hill and a monument on it. Gaios Julios Antiochos Epiphanes Philopappos was the exiled prince of Commagene, grandson of the greek king Antiochos IV of Commagene and the greek queen Iotapa.

    The monument (pic 2) was erected by his sister at 116A.D. after Philopapos’ death and in fact it’s the tomb of him. Its dimensions are 9.80mx9.30mx3.08m.

    I still don’t understand why the Athenians allowed him to be buried there, right opposite the Acropolis rock. Ok, it was in honor of him as a great benefactor of Athens but it sounds strange for me though because if he was such a great benefactor what can we say about Pericles etc

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  • Jmill42's Profile Photo

    Philopappos Hill

    by Jmill42 Written Mar 16, 2004

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    The View Atop Mt Philopappos

    This hill got its name from the monument on its peak. The monument was built to in 115 A.D as a memorial to Gaius Julius Antiochus Philopappos who was a Roman leader of the day. The monument contains staues of Filopappos and his family.

    Alos on the hill, there is the small Byzantine chapel of Agios Dimitrios which some really detailed frescoes.

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  • Jmill42's Profile Photo

    Philopappos (Filopappos) Hill

    by Jmill42 Written Mar 16, 2004

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    The View of Acropolis and Lycabettus in background

    Given my choice, I would chose to climb up Mt Filopappos Hill for a view of Athens, rather than Lycabettus. It has a wonderful rock outcropping down from the monument that gives a wonderful, quiet, serene view over the Acropolis and city. As with all hills, there is a bit of a climb. Once again, Filopappos wins over Lycabettus, as you begin your walk in a park and wind along a tree-lined path up to the scenic outlook or monument further up the hill.

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  • iblatt's Profile Photo

    Best view of Athens

    by iblatt Updated Jul 10, 2010

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    Panoramic view from top of Philopappou Hill,Athens
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    Philopappou Hill is located across from the Acropolis, to the southwest.
    It offers magnificent views of the whole city, and also serenity and tranquility with hardly any tourist in sight.

    I climbed Philopappou Hill on a June afternoon; the weather was not too hot, and walking up the trails and steps amongst pine groves was a pleasure.

    At the bottom of the hill you can see the so-called 'Prison of Sokrates', which is an ancient cave dwelling; legend has it that Sokrates was imprisoned here.
    At the summit there are the remains of the 2nd century AD Monument of Philopappos, a powerful Roman consul. Part of the frieze still remains.

    No doubt, the best Philopappou Hill can offer are the sweeping views from the top. The Acropolis is clearly seen, and Lykavitos Hill appears in the distance behind it; the New Acropolis Museum, the National Gardens, the suburbs of Athens all the way to Piraeus and the Saronic Gulf, this panorama is just wonderful. Sitting at the top, admiring the view, with no sound except a bird here and there, feeling the gentle breeze on my face, was a real pleasure.

    I guess my video conveys the messaage better than a thousand words:
    http://members.virtualtourist.com/m/vv/3a68/

    One note about the trails: they are not marked, and there are many of them all around the slopes of the hill, but if you keep climbing uphill you will get to the top with any trail, and the same goes for the way down.

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  • leigh767's Profile Photo

    Great view!

    by leigh767 Updated Aug 23, 2009

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    View of the Acropolis from Philly

    To walk up the entire hill to reach the monument will take approximately 20 minutes of good exercise, but once up there, the view is magnificent! The Acropolis and the sprawling city all around you, the panoramic view is lovely! Halfway up, there is flat landing and cool, shady areas for you to stretch out on a bench and read a book. It's a wonderful way to relax-- how often can one relax with a view of 5000 years of history? :D

    For the history buffs or plain curious: Philopappos Hill was named after Prince Gaius Julius Antiochus Philopappos of Commagene. This kingdom in Upper Syria was overthrownby Romans in 72 AD and the prince was exiled to Athens to become the benefactor of the city. He spent several years (between 114 AD and 116 AD) building his own monument on this very hill. The monument, which can still be seen today, is made of Pentelic marble and shows Prince Philopappos himself alongside some of his ancestors. You can't miss it!

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  • littlesam1's Profile Photo

    Athens - Hill of the Muses - Philopappos Hill

    by littlesam1 Updated Jun 12, 2007

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    Monument to Philapappos
    2 more images

    Just behind my hotel was Philappapous Hill or The Hill of the Muses. There are trails leading up to the top of the hill where you will find a large monument to the memory of the roman consul Gaius Julius Antiochus Philopappos. Like most things in Athens its quite old. It was erected in 115 AD.

    The Hill of the Muses name comes from mythology. It was believed this hill was the home to 9 muses. There are beautiful trails leading up to the top of hill. Most are line with pine trees, so unlike other hills in Athens there is shade available to protect you from the sun. There are no roads so walking is the only way to reach the top of the hill.

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  • ChrsStrl's Profile Photo

    Climb Philopappos for the view and monument

    by ChrsStrl Written May 11, 2003

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    The view from the monument

    In the pine forest area away from the bustle of the crowd is the hill which is crowned by the Monument to Philopappos. Few people come here yet the view of the Parthenon is excellent and it is a haven far from the madding crowd that you can watch milling on the Acropolis itself.

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  • kanjon's Profile Photo

    Free view!

    by kanjon Updated Jun 12, 2008

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    Up here on Pholopappos hill, or, "The hill of the Muses" (love that name!!!) you get your own, free view of Athens, from the sea to the other hills. Marvellous! Acropolis is at its best here, at least until they finish the museum, far from the bigger crowds. Of course there are other tourists, but they all were cool, and we took each others photos. it is quite a climb, but well worth it, the view is amazing!

    There is a lot to see here apart from the view: a monument of Gaios Julios Antiochos Epiphanes Philopappos, that is also his tomb, built by the Romans in 114-116 AD, the Byzantine Church Agios Dimitrios and, maybe coolest of all, the hill of the Pnyx, where democracy is said to be born!!!! Until we find a better way we must celebrate its birth! Ironically, when talking of democracy, the hill also holds a cave where it is said that Socrates was jailed, having said too much about the Athenians of the time´s sense of justice...

    I also like the "wild" part of the hill, with bushes and natural paths. In our stroll we met a lot of Athenians walking their dogs, a live turtle and a live flasher, smiling happily at us while, yeah... So, maybe this isn´t the place to walk alone...

    To me, this place is of greatest interest, as it was from this spot the Venician army attacked the Acropolis during their siege of Athens in 1687. The Parthenon was used as a powder magazine by the Ottomans and on September 26 1687, one of captain-general Francesco Morosini's cannon-balls hit right on target... More on this on my coming tip on Acropolis...

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  • Lilasel's Profile Photo

    Philopappos Hill

    by Lilasel Written Nov 13, 2004

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    The view from the hill

    Philopappos Hill is one of the few green areas in the city and an ideal place for walking, with magnificent views of the Acropolis and the sea. It is also a favourite promenade place for the Athenians.

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  • AndyRG's Profile Photo

    The monument on Philopappou hill

    by AndyRG Updated May 27, 2003

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    It was built by the Athenians around 114-115 AD, in honor of the benefactor of Athens Antiochus Philopappos. The monument was built of the famous white pentelic marble. The place offers a perfect view of the Acropolis.

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  • mikey_e's Profile Photo

    A Quiet Alternative

    by mikey_e Written Jul 4, 2007

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    Philipappou from the Acropolis
    2 more images

    Its true, the Philipappou Hill is nowhere near as spectacular as the Acropolis - the single funerary monument at the top of the Hill cannot even be compared to the Parthenon - but it does provide a quiet alternative if you want to take pictures of the city. The monument was erected between 114 and 116 CE in honour of Julius Antiochus Philipappos and is still in fairly good shape - you can clearly make out the decoration on the monument itself. More importantly, however, the hill has a clear view of the city below and is usually fairly quiet, allowing you the chance to contemplate the city, which is more than you can do amongst the crowds at the Acropolis.

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  • Philopappou Hill

    by janbeeu Updated Jul 18, 2005

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    The monument on Philopappou Hill

    The Hill of the Muses, south-west of the Acropolis and with a view that sweeps from the Salamis Gulf to the Argolic Hills, is now known as Philopappou Hill. From here you are almost at eye-level with the Acropolis and you have a breathtaking view of the Parthenon. Below, the city stretches out for miles around, extending to the mountains of Parnitha and Imittos. The monument in memory of the Roman Gaius Ioulius Antiochus Philopappos, a benefactor of the town, was put on the top of the hill in 115 AD.

    Between the Hill of the Muses and Pnyx there was the Koili (cavity), one of the most densely populated areas of Athens. Access the trails and footpaths of Philopappou from Dionysiou Areopagitou Street. Opposite the tea pavilion and the rustic chapel of Agiou Dimitriou, flagstone footpaths lined with wild flowers wind up through the pine groves. Doves coo sleepily in the trees. Philopappou is a place to meditate and contemplate the marvels of this grand old city. The downward trail leads to the Pnyx, the meeting place of the Assembly where such great orators as Demosthenes and Themistocles addressed the citizens of Athens. In the evening, you can come here to watch the spectacular sound and light Show on the Acropolis, which tells the history of the city.

    Beside the Pnyx is Mouseion Hill. Themistocles' long wall ran south from here and commanded the road to the port of Piraeus. Opposite the Pnyx is the Hill of the Nymphs, the site of the Observatory.

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