The Temple of Olympian Zeus, Athens

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  • Temple of Olympian Zeus
    Temple of Olympian Zeus
    by didier06
  • Temple of Olympian Zeus
    Temple of Olympian Zeus
    by didier06
  • The Temple of Olympian Zeus
    by Durfun
  • Skibbe's Profile Photo

    The Temple of Zeus and Hadrian's Arch

    by Skibbe Written Jun 21, 2008

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    Hadrian's Arch
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    The Temple is the largest built in Greece for Zeus and its construction was finally completed in AD 131 under Hadrian after six centuries delay. To commemorate that, Hadrian built an arch. On the side of the arch that faces the Acropolis, it reads "This is Athens, the city of Theseus." On the other side, it reads "This is the city of Hadrian and not of Theseus."

    You can see the arch for free. Admission to the Temple comes with the ticket you buy for the Acropolis.

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    A "must see" part of ancient ruins

    by aquatic Written Apr 13, 2008

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    This temple is the largest in Greece. Yes, it is even bigger than Parthenon. You really need to involve your imagination to see how big it was when it was the whole structure... It is really impressive.
    The work on temple of Olympian Zeus begun in 6 century BC, but was not completed until 650 years later. Only 15 columns left out of 104. Each one is 17 meters high. You can see on my photo how small those people are comparing to the columns of the temple.

    After visiting this site you can continue further towards the olympic stadium, and then visit National Art Gallery.

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  • aukahkay's Profile Photo

    Temple of Olympian Zeus

    by aukahkay Written Nov 8, 2007
    Temple of Olympian Zeus
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    The temple of Olympian Zeus is the biggest temple in Greece. It was first built in the 6th century BC but completed only in AD 211 by Hadrian. Only 15 Corinthian columns remain today, a testimony to the ravages of war and weather.

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  • BorneoGrrl's Profile Photo

    Greece's largest temple

    by BorneoGrrl Updated Sep 4, 2007

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    Temple of Olympian Zeus

    Another famous temple in Athens is the Temple of Olympian Zeus, the largest in Greece but only 15 of the 104 columns still stand today. The Roman Emperor Hadrian dedicated the temple to Zeus Olympios or Jupiter in Rome in AD 132.

    While the temple may once held many fabulous statues of the king & gods, nothing remains of the temples besides the columns.

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  • viddra's Profile Photo

    Once the largest temple in Greece

    by viddra Updated Jul 19, 2007
    a view from the Acropolis

    The building of this temple started in the 6th century BC, but was finished in the 2nd century AD.

    It was once the largest temple in Greece.

    The marble temple used to consist of 104 Corinthian columns, but only 15 of these remain standing.

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    Temple of Olympian Zeus

    by mikey_e Written Jul 4, 2007

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    Temple of the Olympian Zeus

    The Temple of Olympian Zeus took 7 centuries to complete, but its long construction was due to financial difficulties rather than any sort of engineering concerns (something the modern Athenians know all too well). The Temple was begun in the 6th century BCE by Peisistratos but was not finished until Hadrian's reign in the 2nd Century CE. Many of the ancient statues are now gone, but the impressive columns are still standing - all except one, blown down by a massive storm in 1852.

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  • say-no-more's Profile Photo

    the house of zeus

    by say-no-more Updated Jun 27, 2007

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    the temple of zeus is still very, very impressive, although there is very little of it left... but still you can feel the spirit of the ancient greeks there... the feeling that once there was something great going on there... thrilling.. almost magical....

    and those pillars which have fallen are very cool, like some sliced salami or something :D

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  • littlesam1's Profile Photo

    Athens - Temple of the Olympian Zeus

    by littlesam1 Updated Jun 11, 2007

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    Temple of the Olympian Zeus
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    Every guide book I read stated that The Temple of Olympian Zeus was the largets temple in Ancient Athens exceeding even The Parthenon in size. When I was on the Acropolis I saw the remains of this temple in the distance. When you walk to the temple and see it close up you do realize the magnitude of its size. There are only a few columns remaining, but the space the temple occupied is blocked out so you can realize the size. The temple was started in the year 515 BC but not completed until 132 AD. There were many attempts to complete it over the years. The columns are of Corinthian design. I have a close up of the top of one of the columns in the group of pictures with this tip.

    The admission is included in the price of the ticket for The Acropolis.

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  • leffe3's Profile Photo

    Temple of Olympian Zeus

    by leffe3 Updated Mar 30, 2007
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    Ruinous it may be now, but this is the remains of the biggest single temple in Greece. Begun in the 6th century BC, it took 650 years to complete! There were 104 columns in the original - sadly only 15 remain, each 17 metres (56 feet) high. The original building was 96 metres long by 40 metres wide - now it sits in a busy traffic roundabout near to the National Park and within sight of the Acropolis.

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  • rcsparty's Profile Photo

    Temple of Zeus

    by rcsparty Written Sep 8, 2006

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    Construction on the Temple of Zeus started in the 6th century BC. It was finally finished 700 years later by the Roman Emperor Hadrian in 125AD. This is also an Athens must see. Of the original 104 columns that supported the temple, only 15 remain. However, those 15 make it easy to imagine how massive this temple was. Looking at the columns, you can almost imagine the huge gold/ivory statue of Zeus that was housed in the temple. It is impossible to really comprehend the size of the columns until you are standing next to them, so don't just observe from the fence.

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    Zeus

    by saw50st8 Written Jul 6, 2006

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    Tour the Temple of Olympian Zeus. Although you cannot go close up to the ancient columns, you do get a good view from a few feet back. Some of the columns have fallen down, giving a wonderful view of how the columns are contructed.

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    Temple of Godzeus! ("Bless you")

    by Confucius Updated Jun 15, 2006

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    The Temple of Zeus as seen from behind the fence

    I heard one English speaking Greek tour guide call this place the "Temple of Godzeus"
    There used to be 104 Corinthian columns when Roman ruler Hadrian completed it in 131 but today only 16 remain; 15 standing and one that fell down during a storm in 1852.
    In 2001, the temple was chosen by the Culture Minister as the controversial setting for the Mythodea musical extravaganza by Vangelis (the "Chariots of Fire" musician), as Athens celebrated the Mars Odyssey mission. Local archaeologists cringed while trucks and cranes transported equipment onto the 2,500-year-old temple site to set up a temporary amphitheatre, scaffolding and tents.
    It was believed that publicity from the event would boost the number of visitors to the Temple of Olympian Zeus, yet some tourists are still content to simply take photos through the fence.

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  • Olympian Zeus - the biggest Greek temple

    by nyer Written Jun 2, 2006

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    Temple of Olympian Zeus
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    Right in the heart of the city, 15 to 20 minutes walking distance from the Acropolis is the amazing Temple of Olympian Zeus. Also right next to it is Hadrian's Arch. The Olympian Zeus is reportedly the biggest Greek temple, and its construction spanned over 700 years and was finally completed under the reign of the Roman emperor Hadrian. Hadrian's arch was built by the Athenians to show their gratitude to Hadrain. Though only a few of the original columns survive, the few that do gives one a good idea of how huge the temple must have been.

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    All that remains

    by leigh767 Written Apr 15, 2006

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    A 4-shot stitch of a part of the temple

    Suppose you're somewhere between 5'10'' and 6' tall. Imagine something twice that height, and double THAT. Now double THAT height and add two more men of your own height on top of it. That's the height of a column at this temple. Now imagine there were 104 of such towering Corinthian columns back in 2AD. Today, all that remains are 15 columns and a fence of ropes around them. Time wounds all heels.

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  • lashr1999's Profile Photo

    Temple of Olympian Zeus

    by lashr1999 Written Oct 15, 2005

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    The temple was built by Emperor Hadrian around 132 AD. It is considered one of the largest temples in antiquity. Today only 15 of the 104 marble columns remain. In 1852 one of the columns broke down, and the parts still stand where they fell.

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