Ancient Corinth Things to Do

  • temple of Apollo with Acrocorinth at the backgroun
    temple of Apollo with Acrocorinth at the...
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  • Glauke Fountain
    Glauke Fountain
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  • Peirene Fountain
    Peirene Fountain
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Most Recent Things to Do in Ancient Corinth

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    Temple of Apollo

    by hquittner Updated Nov 3, 2011

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    Temple of Apollo
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    The Temple of Apollo in Corinth was built in 550-525 BC. in Doric style. It was restored in Roman times. Only seven pillars remain and a part of a pediment. It stands near the Agora in the lower city.

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    Acrocorinth

    by mindcrime Updated May 12, 2009

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    After visiting the Ancient Corinth archeological site we headed up to mountain that overlooks the ancient town. It’s called Acrokorinthos (acro in greek means edge) and was occupiced several times from the ancient times because of its strategic position over the Corinth Gulf. There is a castle there with ruins form different architectural styles because Romans, Byzantines, Turks and Venetians ruled the area for smaller or longer periods. For me, going up there was the highlight of my visit in Corinth because of the amazing views. Its 574 meters high and you can walk inside the castle that has a perimeter of 3000 meters in our days.

    There 3 different outer walls, most of them from medieval period (and some ottoman additions) and some massive main gates (pic 3, you will pass all 3 of them anyway). Inside the castle you can see chapels(pic 4), an abandoned mosque but for me the most impressive were the several paths lined with beautiful blossom poppies (pic 5). The most important site here was the Temple of Aphrodite though, a famous and important temple for the men of ancient Corinth because it housed many sacred prostitues that gave joy to them :) No sign of them in our days of course but you can see some ruins of the temple.

    For many years, I was passing from Corinth and looking up at Acrocorinth but I managed to visit it only in 2009! We walked a lot in and around the castle and definitely worth to stand on the edge of the walls and enjoy the view.

    The castle is open 8.30-15.00 (till 19.00 in summer) and there’s no entrance fee. Wear comfortable shoes to walk on the cobble path that is slippery on some parts. The cobble path before the second gate is one of the most beautiful parts.

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    the museum

    by mindcrime Updated May 12, 2009

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    Ancient Corinth's museum
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    Inside the Ancient Corinth archeological site is little museum that you can visit with the same ticket. It houses a nice collection of mosaics, statues, grave stones, amphoras etc It’s not that big so you can stroll around in a few minutes around the different rooms that are separated on different era (Neolithic, Helladic, proto Geometric, Hellenistic etc). I also noticed some statues from later centuries and big collection of pottery, figurines, bottles and coins. The reliefs about the amazon fights are also interesting.

    The room that is dedicated to Askleipion is one of the most interesting with many items about medicine. Asklipios was the god of medicine and although he wasn’t one of the important gods in greek mythology he is a kind of archetype of heroes-healers.

    The museum is opened when the site is open so: 8.00 - 20.00 (summer) and 8.00 - 17.00 (winter).
    It’s opposite the main entrance but I left it for the end of my visit.

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    Archeological site - The fountains

    by mindcrime Updated May 12, 2009

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    Glauke Fountain
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    Like I said in previous tip the first thing you see on your left is the Glauke Fountain(pic 1), a large cubic mass of limestone named after Glauke the daughter of Creon(king of Corinth). When Midea tried to poised her, Glauke felt into the fountain to stop the poison from burning her. Originally the fountain was contained withing a long limestome ridge running west from Temple Hill. Unlike all other fountains in Corinth, Glauke fountain does not exploit a natural spring but is fed by water piped in from a source in the south.

    The second fountain is located next to Lechaion road. It is the Peirene Fountain (pic 2), that was standed upon a natural spring that still flows underground. The fountain was impressive but it's a pity that you can't walk inside the site because it's under renovation. The myth about it is also interesting: Peirene was the daughter of Aisopus and the lover of Poseidon (god of sea) that felt into tears when Artemis accidentally killed her son Kechrias. From her tears the fountain was risen on this site! Kechrias and Lecheon were the two sons of Peirini that gave their name at two ports of Ancient Corinth.

    The Peirene fountain was an important gathering place. It is said the the cynic philosopher Diogenis lived here inside a pythari (big amphorea) and this is where he met with Laida (the most famous sacred prostitute of that era).

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    Archeological site

    by mindcrime Updated May 12, 2009

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    temple of Apollo with Acrocorinth at the backgroun

    The ruins of Ancient Corinth is the most popular and important sight to see in Corinth area. There are a large number of ruins of old buildings, temples, the agora etc
    Althought the city of Ancient Corinth covered an area of about 15 km what you can visit here is the excavated site but you can also see ancient walls all over the village of Archea Korinthos(Ancient Corinth in greek).

    As you go inside you pay for the entrance (6 euro) that includes entrance to the museum too (leave this for the end). They give you a simple leaflet but it’s better if you buy a better guide book if you are not on an organized tour with a guide. There are also many signs with schetches, plans of the original buildings and the area and written info about some of the ruins in greek/English/german (most of the info here is from there).

    The first thing you see on your left is the Glauke Fountain, a large cubic mass of limestone named after Glauke the daughter of Creon(king of Corinth).
    The highlight that dominates Ancient Corinth is the Temple of Apollo of course. It’s temple that was built in 6th century BC on the ruins of a temple from the 7th century BC. The temple was built in Doric style and you can see 7 remaining columns of it that used to be at the back side of the temple while originally the temple had 42 columns. At my photo you can see the temple with the Acrocorinth on the background (also some houses of the village). I stopped here for a while to read my book about Corinth.

    Then I visited the buildings at west end of Roman Agora and the Bema. Bema is a marbled structure that used to be the venue for public ceremonies and the place where the proconsul of Corinth judged citizens that were accused for some reason like Apostle Paul from Corinth’s jews. In Byzantine period a Christian church was built on the site of Bema. Next to Bema you can still see the main shops of Agora (Forum) and then walk along the main road of the Agora which was Lechaion road was the most important road and you can see much of the area around it on the info sign. The most interesting site around here is the Peirene Fountain, that was standed upon a natural spring that still flows underground. The fountain was impressive but the myth about it is also interesting: Peirene was the daughter of Aisopus and the lover of Poseidon (god of sea) that felt into tears when Artemis accidentally killed her son Kechrias. So she transformed into a fountain for eternal mourning about here son.

    After strolling around the South Stoa and the Temple E. Actually this is what left of the temple of Octavia, decicated to the sister of Augustus Ceasar. It was time for the Corinth museum. You can visit the museum for a nice collection of mosaics, statues, amphoras etc It’s not that big so you can stroll around in a few minutes.

    The site is open 8.00 - 20.00 (summer) and 8.00 - 17.00 (winter). If come on your own try to visit the place early in the morning or late in the afternoon to avoid the heat. I never saw big amounts of tourists but I have to admit that I never visited Ancient Corinth during summer

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    ruins from the Roman city around Arhea Corinth

    by angiebabe Written Jan 2, 2009

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    The Roman city of Ancient Corinth had such wealth and covered such an area that the walls around it made a 15 kilometre circuit.

    The main site for visiting today is the main excavated site of the centre of Ancient Corinth which is enclosed and has opening and closing times for visiting - but can be seen through the wire fence enclosures.

    but there are many remains from the old city around the area and through the modern village of Ancient Corinth now called Arhea Korinthos.

    Just as exciting to see the ancient remains of Corinth - where Apostle Paul in the Bible was for 2 years and where his prominent letter to the Corinthians was written to - its exciting to drive and walk around the village and area and come across walls or sites that are obviously from the remains of the ancient city that stood here before us!

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    Temple of Apollo

    by angiebabe Updated Jan 2, 2009

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    7 remaining Doric columns of Apollo's temple
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    In 146 BC the Romans defeated the Greek city-states of the Achaean League and razed the the site to the ground. The city lay in ruins before being rebuilt on a grand scale by Julius Caesar in 44 BC.

    The city endured until rocked by two major earthquakes in the 4th and 6th centuries AD which brought down the Roman buildings and depopulated the site until a brief Byzantine period in the 11th century.

    The main focus of this site here in central Ancient Corinth is the rare survival from the Classical Greek era of the 5th century BC temple of Apollo.

    7 Doric columns remain, standing slightly above the level of the forum and flanked by the foundations of another market place and baths.

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    Mosaics found at Ancient Corinth

    by angiebabe Updated Jan 2, 2009

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    Here in the museum are some very good Greek and Roman mosaics from nearby.

    One of the photos is of a mosaic depicting a pastoral scene which was part of a larger floor from a Roman villa found at Ancient Corinth from 150-200 AD.

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    the fountain of Hatzi Mustafa

    by angiebabe Written Jan 1, 2009

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    Apparently many sites around Greece that show any bearings of Ottoman or Turkish occupation have been defaced or removed - but here at the beginnning of the ascent up to the acropolis site of Ancient Corinth, Acrocorinth is the still used fountain from Ottoman days, of Hatzi Mustafa.

    It has since been christianized with crosses but the turkish or arabic inscriptions can be clearly seen.

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    Roman Odeion

    by angiebabe Updated Jan 1, 2009

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    A Roman theatre, another building built for the public by Emperor Hadrian's wealthy friend Herodes Atticus, who built the Fountain of Peirenes here at Ancient Corinth and many of Athens' Roman public buildings, is just outside the main entrance to the main excavation site of Ancient Corinth.

    Also enclosed by a wire fence for viewing from the roads that surround the site there are substantial remains of this theatre that can be seen.

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    One of the largest Stoa of Ancient Greece

    by angiebabe Updated Jan 1, 2009

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    Within the main excavated site of Ancient Corinth dominated by the remains of the Roman city,at the edge of the enormous marketplace, or agora, are the foundations of a huge stoa, once a building of several storeys, with 33 shops on the ground floor.

    The information provided on site tells us that this Stoa, built in the late 4th century BC, was one of the largest in Ancient Greece covering 0.4 hectare. It had a facade with 71 Doric columns and an internal colonnade with 34 Ionic columns.

    During the Roman period - 1st century BC to 3rd centuries AD, conversions were made - including the making of a paved road to Kenchreai through the middle of the stoa!

    The stoa was eventually abandoned in 6 AD.

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    Greek theatre ruins

    by angiebabe Updated Jan 1, 2009

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    Across the road from the main site, in another enclosed site, you can see through the enclosing fence the outlines of a large Greek theatre - according to the Rough Guide it was adapted by the Romans for gladiatorial sea battles.

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    Museum of Ancient Corinth

    by angiebabe Updated Jan 1, 2009

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    Included in the admission ticket to the site is a visit to the museum which is a few metres in from the main entrance with a good collection of statues, grave stones, domestic pieces, and Greek and Roman mosaics from villas in the locality.

    Along with the opening times of the main excavated site, times are really inadequate with its 'winter' opening times which continue into late May meaning that everything shuts early at 3pm. So beware and be aware and plan your day to arrive at sites like these early.

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    Fountain of Peirene

    by angiebabe Updated Jan 1, 2009

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    The elaborate fountain of Peirene stands below the level of the agora, to the side of an excavated stretch of the marble paved Lechaion Way - which was the main approach to the city.

    On the site of a natural spring which still flows through underground cisterns and supplies the modern village of Arhea Corinth. The water was channelled into a magnificent fountain and pool in the courtyard within a colonnaded and frescoed recess which had been provided as a gift from Herodes Atticus, a weathly Athenian and friend of Emperor Hadrian.

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    Views from medieval AcroCorinth

    by angiebabe Updated Dec 22, 2008

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    The ruins of the ancient city of Corinth, which once displaced Athens as Capital of the Greek province during Roman times, ramble over a vast area - the city walls once had a 15km circuit! The main enclosure is the central area which has been excavated and encompasses the Roman forum and the temple of Apollo.

    The most standout site are the ruins of the medieval city on the ancient acropolis site towering 565 metres above the ancient city. Acrocorinth became one of Greece's most powerful fortresses during the middle ages.

    Its a 4 kilometre climb - about an hours walk or a few minutes by car - and the views are recommended over the Gulf of Korinthos and Saronic Gulf and with binoculars or a good zoom you can get good close views or shots down to the central area of the ancient city.

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