Corinth Things to Do

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    Museum Visit

    by painterdave Updated Aug 30, 2011

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    Inside the Korinth Ruins Site is a small museum. Most of the really valuable things in all the Greek sites were taken to Athens, but you can always find some interesting things to see in their museums. This museum has some good statues, and parts of statues that they have found.
    Displayed behind a glass window are collections of body parts that were either knocked off or through time fell off.
    I heard a guide saying that a lot of these artifacts had been stolen and were returned from the U.S. I cannot confirm this, but makes it interesting.
    See photos.

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    CRUISE THROUGH THE CORINTH CANAL

    by travelgourmet Updated Jul 18, 2011

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    APPROACHING THE CORINTH CANAL
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    One must ride on a boat, barge, cruise ship or anything that can sail through the Corinth Canal. It is one of the most exhilarating adventures I have undertaken. As you approach the canal you can see the massive cuts made on the side walls that rise so high above.

    Inside the canal, the walls appear to be only feet away, as if I could touch the wall by reaching out over the rail of the ship. Finally, the ship arrives at the point where I was standing in 1985 looking down at ships passing under the bridge. Now, I am looking up at the bridge and see people looking down at me. It sent shivers down my spine to pass under that bridge and I was so elated when the ship emerged on the other side of the canal.

    Thoughts of building a path through water in 602 BC, completed in 1893 AD and now I have ridden the waters of two seas, the Aegean connecting with the lonian Sea, through the Corinth Canal. My dream came true. I found a video of a sailing through that you might enjoy. See the VIDEO of passing through the Corinth Canal.

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    The Corinth Canal

    by JessieLang Written May 26, 2011

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    The Corinth Canal joins the Aegean Sea and the Ionian Sea, cutting through the narrow Isthmus of Corinth and separates the Peloponnesian peninsula from the Greek mainland. The Canal is not quite 4 miles long, but ships could save hundreds of miles by going through it. (Big modern ships can’t use it—they are too wide.) People had wanted to construct a canal here since the 7th Century BC, and it finally happened in the 1890s. After a failed attempt by the French, the canal was finished by the Hungarians.

    In the early days there was a belief that anyone building a canal there would be cursed. Our guide suggested that it may have been a rumor started by the Corinthians because they dragged the ships across on a log platform for a fee, and they didn’t want to lose the revenue!

    The bridge across the canal has a pedestrian walkway, and that is the best way to see it. Informational signs give statistics of the canal and describe its construction. People a lot braver than me can sign up to bungee-jump from the bridge.

    A bay on the Aegean side was the site of the 5th Century BC Battle of Salamis, where Greek ships from a number of city-states fought the Persians and won. The famous battle of Thermopylae (Spartans vs. Persians) was about 50 miles north of the Gulf of Corinth on the Ionian Sea.

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  • etfromnc's Profile Photo

    The movable platform

    by etfromnc Updated Sep 8, 2010

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    I thought that I knew just about everything that there was to know about the early Christian-era of Corinth but I got to see something during my latest trip which I had never seen before. Most students of Corinthian history or archeology are familiar with the fact that to avoid the 185 mile sail around the Peloponnesos ancient sailors would take their ships out of the sea at the Isthmus of Corinth and roll them across the isthmus, a distance of about 10 miles.
    Since my previous visit, the route of the Diolkos (Greek for "moving platform") has been excavated and we can now walk on some of the same rocks over which sea-going ships were transported millenia ago.

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    Sail Through the Canal

    by janetanne Written Jun 13, 2010

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    Plaque to Nero 68AD
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    Now, you can go to the port at Ismia on the Aegean port of the Corinthian Canal and take a small private boat through the canal and return. The ride was magnificent. The boat was clean and efficient and very comfortable. We sat on the top of the boat where I was able to get some fabulous photos. One of the most interesting things to look for, is a carved plaque on the South wall near the Ionian port of the canal, that was carved sometime near 68AD in honour of the Roman Emperor Nero, who was the first to begin excavations on the canal.

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    Ancient Corinth

    by Yank_o Written Jan 8, 2010
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    The late Greek (Hellenistic) & Roman remains of Corinth are to be seen in a tourist-friendly site, in the modern-day village of Ancient Corinth / Archea Korinthos.

    At the centre of this site is the agora/forum.

    The village used to be the site of modern Corinth until an earthquake destruction in 1858.

    Recent pedestrianization has made the area a bit more attractive.

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    Acrocorinth

    by mindcrime Written May 11, 2009

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    Acrocorinth
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    After visiting the Ancient Corinth archeological site we headed up to mountain that overlooks the ancient town. It’s called Acrokorinthos (acro in greek means edge) and was occupiced several times from the ancient times because of its strategic position over the Corinth Gulf. There is a castle there with ruins form different architectural styles because Romans, Byzantines, Turks and Venetians ruled the area for smaller or longer periods. For me, going up there was the highlight of my visit in Corinth because of the amazing views. Its about 600 meters high and you can walk inside the castle. There 3 different outer walls and some massive main gates. Inside the castle you can see chapels, an abandoned mosque but for me the most impressive were the several paths lined with beautiful blossom poppies. The most important site here was the Temple of Aphrodite though, a famous and important temple for the men of ancient Corinth because it housed many sacred prostitues that gave joy to them :) No sign of them in our days of course but you can see some ruins of the temple.

    The castle is open 8.30-15.00 (till 19.00 in summer) and there’s no entrance fee. Wear comfortable shoes to walk on the cobble path that is slippery on some parts.

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    Ancient Corinth

    by mindcrime Written May 11, 2009

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    temple of Apollo
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    The ruins of Ancient Corinth is the most popular and important sight to see in Corinth area. There are a large number of ruins of old buildings, temples, the agora etc
    Althought the city of Ancient Corinth covered an area of about 15 km what you can visit here is the excavated site but you can also see ancient walls all over the village of Archea Korinthos(Ancient Corinth in greek).

    As you inside you pay for the entrance (6 euro) that includes entrance to the museum too (leave this for the end). They give you a simple leaflet but it’s better if you buy a better guide book if you are not on an organized tour with a guide. There are also many signs with schetches, plans of the original buildings and the area and written info about some of the ruins in greek/English/german (most of the info here is from there).

    The first thing you see on your left is the Glauke Fountain, a large cubic mass of limestone named after Glauke the daughter of Creon(king of Corinth). When Midea tried to poised her, Glauke felt into the fountain to stop the poison from burning her. Originally the fountain was contained withing a long limestome ridge running west from Temple Hill. Unlike all other fountains in Corinth, Glauke fountain does not exploit a natural spring but is fed by water piped in from a source in the south.

    The highlight that dominates Ancient Corinth is the Temple of Apollo of course. It’s temple that was built in 6th century BC on the ruins of a temple from the 7th century BC. The temple was built in Doric style and you can see 7 remaining columns of it that used to be at the back side of the temple while originally the temple had 42 columns.

    Then I visited the buildings at west end of Roman Agora and the Bema. Bema is a marbled structure that used to be the venue for public ceremonies and the place where the proconsul of Corinth judged citizens that were accused for some reason like Apostle Paul from Corinth’s jews. In Byzantine period a Christian church was built on the site of Bema. Next to Bema you can still see the main shops of Agora (Forum) and then walk along the main road of the Agora which was Lechaion road was the most important road and you can see much of the area around it on the sign (pic ). The most interesting site around here is the Peirene Fountain, that was standed upon a natural spring that still flows underground. The fountain was impressive but the myth about it is also interesting: Peirene was the lover of Poseidon (god of sea) that felt into tears when Artemis accidentally killed her son Kechrias.

    After strolling around the South Stoa and the Temple E I went into the museum. You can visit the museum for a nice collection of mosaics, statues, amphoras etc It’s not that big so you can stroll around in a few minutes.

    The site is open 8.00 - 20.00 (summer) and 8.00 - 17.00 (winter). If come on your own try to visit the place early in the morning or late in the afternoon to avoid the heat. I never saw big amounts of tourists but I have to admit that I never visited Ancient Corinth during summer

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    the Corinth canal(isthmus)

    by mindcrime Written May 11, 2009

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    The Corinth Canal
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    Although the Ancient Corinth is more important historically, the Corinth Canal was so impressive since the first time I saw it (during my childhood) so I will put this as a must see for sure. The old expressway from Athens to Part was over it in the past so we were very excited every time we were crossing the canal even if we didn’t stop. Now, the new expressway is further inside but still there are locals and tourists that come here to admire the canal and have a coffee or a souvlaki around.

    Corinth Isthmus is a canal that connects the Corinth and the Saronic Gulfs and actually seprates the Peoloponesus from Attica peninsula and mainland.

    It was the ancient era (during Periandros tyranny back in 7th century BC) when they tried to find a way for a quick transfer of goods so they put a ramp (called Diolkos) across the Corinth Isthmus to drag the ships and avoid doing the long and dangerous circumnavigation around Peloponesus. The Romans (during Nero kingdom) had also an idea for a passage that would connect the two seas (Ionian and Aegean) but luck of money cancelled the plan although more than 6000 slaves used during the first years of construction.

    Many centuries later at the end of 19th century the construction of the Corinth Canal begun (finished in 1893) with thousands of ships crossing it although in our days only 11.000 ships per year travel through it (mainly some tourist ships). It is 6300 meters in length, 21 meters wide and about 85 meters high. It was a great technical achievement of that era but kind of small for the huge modern ships.

    Although the new motorway is further down so the long distance buses from Athens don’t cross/stop here there are still some cafes where you can refresh your self or taste a souvlaki. I noticed overpriced items and souvenirs though. You don’t need more than 15 minutes just to take around and take photos from both sides of the old motorway bridge. You can see other bridges all over the canal. You can also have good views of the canal from the bottom side at Isthmia where a small movable allow the boats to enter/exit the canal.

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    Corinth, the modern city

    by mindcrime Written May 11, 2009

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    Corinth port
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    The modern city of Corinth (Korinthos in greek) has nothing to offer really to the visitor because all the sights (ancient Corinth, acrocorinth, the canal etc) are outside of the city. It’s a typical greek city that after some big earthquakes it’s been rebuilt with concrete all over the place with no good taste at all. If it happens to pass by you can enjoy walking near the small port (pic 1 ) and enjoy a frappe at one of the outdoor cafes. There is a church near the port, it’s Agios Nikolaos church with a funny, blue colored interior (pic 2).

    A few meters away from the port is the Historic and Laographic museum (pic 3) on Ermou street 1. It opened in 1988 by Alkmini Petropoulou and it is opened Tuesday to Sunday 8.30-13.30. The museum focus on folkloric items, many agricultural tools and house items, apparel, old books etc
    Although, during the summer the people go down to the port in the other months the youth gather at the cafes of Pyraninos street, a pedestrian street in the center of the city.

    The Apostolos Pavlos cathedral (pic 4) is much more interesting but you have to drive to other side of the city. It is dedicated to Apostle Paul that passed by Ancient Corinth to preach. The cathedral celebrates on June 29. On our way we stopped for a while in front of the Court House where you can see the statue(pic 5) of the bishop Damaskinos (1891-1949) that was eparch of Corinth in the past.

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    Corinth Canal

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Jan 19, 2009

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    Corinth Canal
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    The Corinth Canal is a canal that connects the Gulf of Corinth with the Saronic Gulf in the Aegean Sea. The canal is 6.3 kilometer in length and was built between 1881 and 1893.

    The Corinth Canal is considered a great technical achievement for its time. It saves the 400 kilometers long journey around the Peloponnesus for smaller ships, but since it is only 21 meters wide. The depth of the canal is 8 meters at low water. The maximum air-draft of the Canal is limited to 52m because of the rail and road bridges.
    So it is too narrow for modern ocean freighters.

    Though 11,000 ships per year travel through the waterway (mostly for tourist purposes).

    You may watch my high resolution photos of tha Canal on the Google Earth according to the following coordinates 37º 55' 37.46" N 22º 59' 39.01" E
    and on Google Panoramio Greece Corinth Channel West and Greece Corinth Channel East.

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    The Corinth Canal

    by angiebabe Updated Dec 12, 2008

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    This amazing piece of engineering I reckon is a must-see! Its only an hour by excellent and rather fast/free flowing motorway from the Athens airport where I picked up my rental car. Not a lot of signposting though so its best to have a good road map and rely on that and your senses - as in where to leave the motorway to meet the road that goes over the Corinth Canal and where you can stop your car to park and look around and walk over the bridges at the southeastern end (often referred to as Isthmos) that look down into the canal. There are a few souvenir shops here too with a good selection of things to broadcast youve been to this impressive place. (and good toilets too).

    Then driving to where the canal enters/exits at the northwestern end is by guesswork as well - driving on and then taking a road to the right that follows the coast to meet up with the canal. Was not particularly difficult.

    The idea for a Corinth Canal to provide a short cut and safe passage between the Aegean and Ionian seas dates right back to Roman times, with Nero and his jewish slaves making an attempt, but it was not until the 1890's that technology became available to cut right across the 6km isthmus. Opened in 1893 the Canal helped establish Piraeus as a major port but since supertankers the canal is now hardly needed

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    Korinthos (modern Corinth)

    by angiebabe Written Dec 12, 2008

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    the city of modern Corinth/Korinthos
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    I drove into modern Corinth/Korinthos trying to find the road that would take me along the coastline to meet up with the entrance into the Corinth Canal - and had no reason to head any further into the city as being an industrial and agricultural city along with having being levelled in several severe earthquakes and rebuilt there is pretty much nothing of tourism interest here to see (my Rough guide described it as having been 'repaired and reconstructed with buildings made of characterless concrete'). I simply needed to turn around and find the road turning right that would take me north-east.

    I did get a good view of Korinthos along its shore though from a hill above where the waterway where the Corinth Canal leads from.

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    Views up the Corinth Canal from the entrance

    by angiebabe Written Dec 12, 2008

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    looking up the Corinth Canal
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    Down at the northwestern end of the Corinth Canal where it meets the Gulf of Korinthos, are views up the canal and where you can see the remains of the ancient diolkos which was a paved road where boats were carried across the isthmus.

    The road crosses the water by a small one lane bridge that lifts to allow the boats through in and out of the canal and on which you can get some good views right up the canal.

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    Ancient Diolkos

    by angiebabe Written Dec 12, 2008

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    At the north-western/Korinthos end of the canal, where the canal enters the isthmus from the Gulf of Korinthos, are signs that point out remains of the Ancient Diolkos - a paved way along which a wheeled platform used to carry boats across the isthmus.

    This was in use from the Roman times until the twelfth century and the boats were strapped onto the platform after being relieved temporarily of their cargos.

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