Corinth Things to Do

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Most Recent Things to Do in Corinth

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    Corinth canal cruises

    by angiebabe Written Dec 12, 2008

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    I didnt do this but there were a number of advertisements about for cruises through the canal plus there were boats going through the canal that were obviously tourist boats.

    So this would be a great trip to make if you have the opportunity!

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  • angiebabe's Profile Photo

    Corinth canal cruises

    by angiebabe Written Dec 12, 2008

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    I didnt do this but there were a number of advertisements about for cruises through the canal plus there were boats going through the canal that were obviously tourist boats.

    So this would be a great trip to make if you have the opportunity!

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  • JLBG's Profile Photo

    The modern canal

    by JLBG Updated Jun 29, 2008

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    The modern canal
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    The modern canal was dug between 1882 and 1893. It is 6343 meters long and 21 meters wide.

    The story of the modern digging is not absolutely clear and various sources give somehow contradictory information. I have collected various sources from the literature and finally established the following story which should not be to far from the truth.

    In 1829, Virlet d’Aoust, a member of the French “Expédition de Morée” established a project for digging the Corinth canal.

    Following the successful opening of the Suez Canal, a French company, the “Société Internationale du Canal Maritime de Corinthe" was hired to dig it. It had a capital of 30,000,000 Francs and a 99 years concession. Diggings began on March 29th 1882 and were scheduled to last 4 years. However there had not been enough detailed geological studies and the job was finally more difficult than expected. Increase of the cost of the job led the company to bankruptcy while only both ends of the canal had been dug (I have read somewhere else that they stopped while 80% of the canal had been dug).

    The Greek government hired a Hungarian General and architect, István Türr to establish a detailed planning with Béla Gerster, another Hungarian architect. Finally Andreas Syngros built up a Greek company that hired Antonis Matsas as the main contractor. They resumed the digging and ended the canal in 1893.

    In the beginning, it was mainly use for trading purpose. Only ships under 10,000 tons with a draught less than 8 meters can use it.

    Given the increase in the size of ships, it is now used mostly by cruising boats for the pleasure of tourists and by a few trading boats for local transport.

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  • JLBG's Profile Photo

    Corinth in the Antiquity

    by JLBG Written Jun 4, 2008

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    The Canal

    Already in the the 6th century BC, boats were transported on wagons across the isthmus on a special paved road. Alternatively, goods were unloaded and transported across the isthmus.

    In 67 AD, Nero decided that a canal had to be dug. 6000 prisoners were in charge of the work but the project was abandoned by the next emperor.

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  • JLBG's Profile Photo

    Why a canal in Corinth ?

    by JLBG Written Jun 4, 2008

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    Why a canal in Corinth ?

    If you look at the map the importance of digging a canal into the Corinth isthmus to connect the gulf of Corinth in the Ionion sea and the Saronic gulf in the Egean sea is obvious.

    The purple line is the « regular » sailing from Corinth to Loutraki, around Peloponisos. The route is about 700 km while the isthmus (red line) was a little more than 6 km !

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  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Corinth Canal Bridges

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Written Mar 16, 2008

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    Corinth Canal Bridges
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    I’ve counted 6 bridges across the Canal. We were brought to the Old Motorway Bridge because it’s situated almost at the middle of the Canal and the most fascinating views are opening from there.

    Watching to the West we could see the Railway Bridge with the pedestrian footbridge at the distance less than 500 meters. While zooming my camera I could see the Big Pedestrian Bridge at the distance of 1 kilometer.
    Watching to the East we could see the New Motorway Bridge at the distance of 300 meters where autobahn was passing by.

    There are also 2 sinking bridges in the Corinth Canal today at Poseidonia and at Isthmia -- to facilitate land traffic over it. At each end of the canal, seashore roads cross using submersible bridges that are lowered to the canal bottom to allow maritime traffic to pass.

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  • darkjedi's Profile Photo

    Corinth Canal

    by darkjedi Written Jan 29, 2008

    Passing through Corinth to go somewhere else we crossed over the Corith Canal. Now many years later I have no idea where we were going but the canal stays in my memory forever as the most impressive thing I saw in Greece. It is truly an engineering marvel and a wonder of the world. No photo or description will prepare you for standing over a bridge and looking at its length as it stretches between the two seas.

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    Take a plunge

    by Yank_o Written Aug 23, 2007

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    Summer Sunset at Kalamia Beach

    Less than a km from the very centre, the Kalamia beach is a cool spot for summer months. Swimmable water inside and a promenade complete with cafes and eating places outside. Sunset views are particularly memorable, with much of the Corinth gulf visible from there.

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    Korinthus ruins

    by Heniko Written Apr 14, 2006

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    Korinthus baths

    The ruins of Ancient Korinth, 7km from the modern city, are the main reason most travellers come here. Ancient Korinth, featres a number of ruins, the most notable being the Temple of Apollo, dating from the 5th century BC. There is also a museum on the site that houses a collection of mosiacs and statues

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  • Pieter11's Profile Photo

    Acros Corinth

    by Pieter11 Written Nov 4, 2005

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    The top of Acros Corinth
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    The high fortress of Acros Corinth absolutely is a must to visit when you come to Corinth. It's a 575 metres high hill, overlooking the wide surroundings of the city.

    The oldest parts of the walls of the Fortress come from the 2nd century B.C. and parts were added all the time untill the Venetian Period. Inside the walls a famous temple, dedicated to Aphrodite, was built, just as later there were built churches and even a mosque.

    In total three rings of wall surround the enormous inside. The walls were partly rebuilt during large renovations that started in 1930, and go on untill now. But fortunately the nature still has an imported role inside the fortress, because it makes a magnificent and photogenic mix between nature and culture.

    Acros Corinth is free to visit, and is very quiet. It's a great place to relax, especially at the end of the day, when the most of the tourists are gone already.

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  • Pieter11's Profile Photo

    Ancient Corinth

    by Pieter11 Updated Nov 4, 2005

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    The central Agora of Ancient Corinth
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    In Ancient times, Corinth was one of the most important cities of Greece. It ruled because it had a very important position at two gulfs, at both sides of the Peloponesos. It was right in between Athens and Sparta, for example. It became a seperate state and expanded towards the islands in the Mediterrean, like to Syracuse at Sicily (Italy).

    In 146 B.C. the Romans came and destroyed the wealth of Corinth. It wasn't until 44 B.C. before the city was rebuilt by Julius Ceasar. He made Corinth into an important city for the south of Greece and it even became the capital of the Roman province of Achaea. In this period the city became famous because of the Isthmic Games, that were the biggest of Greece after the Olympics.

    After the fall of the Roman empire, the Ancient city of Corinth was abandoned and not much is left of it today. Especially the Temple of Apollo is still impressive, but the most of the buildings are destroyed during the ages. Still, using some imagination, the greatness of the city is still visible. For example the central Agora (market-square) still is beautiful.

    At the same area as the Ancient City, you'll also find a small museum, mostly showing the famous Corinthic Pillars. Just outside of the area you can also see two small theatres, but not much is left of these buildings.

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    The Canal of Corinth

    by Pieter11 Updated Apr 24, 2005

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    The Canal of Corinth

    The ideas of making this famous canal are very old. The first digging started by the Roman emperor Nero in the year 66. He started with a golden spade. After him, 6.000 jewish labours were forced to continue this work. But for some reason they didn´t finish the work in this period. Of the total of 6343 metres, only 3500 metres was dug out.

    In 1893, after 11 years of digging, the canal was finished. It connects the harbour of Piraeus witht the Adriatic sea, and shortens the route with 350 km´s.

    The canal is 23 metres wide and 8 metres deep. This is too shallow for the biggest ship of today and it´s too dangerous for the smallest boats. So there are very few ships that actually use this canal. If there is a boat that wants to cross the canal it take about half an hour and a lot of care to cross it.

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  • Corinth Canal

    by grkboiler Written Dec 8, 2004

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    Terrible picture of the canal

    The Corinth Canal links the Aegean and the Ionian Seas. It is cut through solid rock and is 6km long, 23m wide, and 90m high.

    It was first thought of by Periander, ruler of Corinth in the 7th century BC. It was a huge undertaking, so he decided not to do it and instead made a paved slip where small boats could be dragged on rollers from one side to the other.

    Alexander the Great and Caligula also thought about a canal, but Nero was the first leader to do anything about it. He began the first digging in a ceremony with a golden pickaxe in 67, then had 6,000 Jewish prisoners try to complete the work. Invasion by the Gauls caused the work to stop, but French engineers completed it between 1883 and 1893.

    It is amazing to see a ship pass through here with precision, edged between the walls just feet from touching them.

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  • amsterdam_vallon's Profile Photo

    Ancient Corinth

    by amsterdam_vallon Updated Nov 18, 2003

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    Ancient Corinth

    The site of Ancient Corinth was first inhabited in the Neolithic period (5000-3000 B.C.). The peak period of the town, though, started in the 8th century B.C. and lasted until its destruction by the Roman general Mummius in 146 B.C. Representative of its wealth is the Doric temple of Apollo which was built in 550 B.C.
    The city was reinhabited in 44 B.C. and gradually developed again. In 51/52 A.D., Apostle Paul visited Corinth. The centre of the Roman city was organized to the south of the temple of Apollo and included shops, small shrines, fountains, baths and other public buildings.

    The invasion of the Herulians in A.D. 267 , initiated the decline of the city though it remained inhabited for many centuries through successive invasions and destructions, until it was liberated from the Turks in 1822.

    See the visit here : Follow the Guide

    Opening Hours : 8.00 - 19.00 (summer) and 8.00 - 17.00 (winter)
    Admission : 6 euro

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  • amsterdam_vallon's Profile Photo

    The Fortress of the Acrocorinth

    by amsterdam_vallon Updated Nov 18, 2003

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    Acrocorinth

    The most important defensive work of the area from antiquity to more recent times. The history of the fortification is closely connected with that of Corinth. Sections of the wall are discernible from ancient pre-Christian times, the Byzantine period, the Frankish domination, the Venetian domination and finally the Turkish occupation . The fortress (castro) is accessible from the western side, departing from the modern village of Ancient Corinth.

    The fortress is secured by a system of three circuit walls reinforced by towers. On the highest of the two peaks of the mountain are traces of the temple of Aphrodite on the site where later stood a church and susequently a Turkish mosque. The second hill top, at the SW edge of the precipitous rock, was fortified during Frankish times and formed the inner keep of the fortress. Remains of churches, mosques, houses, fountains and cisterns are preserved within the second and third peribiloi.

    Opening Hours: 8.00 to 19.00
    Free admission

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