Olympia Things to Do

  • The tunnel leading out to the arena.
    The tunnel leading out to the arena.
    by tropicrd
  • Olympia as seen from the ruins
    Olympia as seen from the ruins
    by mindcrime
  • Kimisi Theotokou church
    Kimisi Theotokou church
    by mindcrime

Most Recent Things to Do in Olympia

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    Museum East Pediment of Zeus Temple

    by hquittner Written May 6, 2012

    Across the way from the entry to the Ruins of Olympia is the latest Archeological Museum which was finished in 1982. In its central hall are installed the two pediments of the Temple of Zeus. The east pediment is centered by a giant figure of Zeus. To his right, stand King Oinomaos and his wife, and to his left are Pelos and Hippodameia. Lateral to these on either side are sets of horses to be used in the chariot race.

    View of Zeus and King of Oinomaos Zeus and Pelops

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    On the Olympic Track

    by hquittner Updated Jan 8, 2012

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    The original running track is once again cleared and marks out the 600 Olympic unit distance. The desire to run the length of the track entices every one to try to run it but some cannot. (See that my wife could still do it).

    On the Running Track After the Run Carolyn Is Almost at the Finish Line The Run Is Over
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    The Entrance to the Stadion

    by hquittner Written Jan 8, 2012

    Near the northeast edge of the Altis is the entrance to the Stadion. It still has a vaulted entrance and adjacent to the entrance are 12 pedestals which supported the Zanes. Many pieces of the Echo Hall are scattered nearby.

    Outside the Vaulted Entrance to the Stadion Pedestals Near the Entrance to the Stadion Inside the Vaulted Entrance
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    The Exedra of Herodes East of the Temple of Hera

    by hquittner Written Jan 1, 2012

    Just east of the Temple of Hera once was an exedra built by Herodes Atticus between 157 and 160 AD. It contained a fountain and was a source of water for the sanctuary. It was fed by a 3 km aqueduct. Segments of the stone that stored the water are restored to their sites and include several lion-head spouts. (Originally there were 83).

    View of Restoration Piece of Rim of Fountain The Lion Heads Piece of Wall of Exedra
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    The Temple of Zeus Is A Spread of Drum Sections

    by hquittner Written Jan 1, 2012

    The Temple of Zeus is near the center of the Altis. There is nothing standing above the height of the base of the temple. There are many groups of drum rounds set around the area suggesting the magnificence that once stood here. The drums were made of shell-limestone and covered in stucco to look like marble.

    A Field of Drum Sections Next to the Temple More Drums
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    Walk to the Temple of Hera

    by hquittner Written Dec 24, 2011

    The Heraion or Temple of Hera is one of the oldest Greek large buildings partly standing. It is of the 6C BC but may be older. Parts of 34 pillars survive and it is Doric a peripteral hexastyle with 16 columns on the long sides. A few pillars have been set in place to improve the view.

    Corner of Temple of Hera View of a Short Side Other End of Temple
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  • tropicrd's Profile Photo

    The Olympic ruins come alive.

    by tropicrd Written Aug 13, 2011

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    Ancient Olympia was a very special time,walking on the footprints of Olympic gods.

    The ruins of the Temple of Zues,the place where the Olympic flame was lit and the archway to the original oblong olympic arena where the Greeks ran back and forth naked.

    One can imagine how it used to be back in ancient times.

    It is an easy stroll and suitable for wheelchairs and prams/pushers.

    The tunnel leading out to the arena. The olympic tunnel looking from the arena Amongst the olympic ruins The original  flame area.. Facinating ruins.
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    Olympia Museum

    by JessieLang Written May 25, 2011

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    The museum's collection begins with items from the final Neolithic Period (4300-3100 BC) and works forward. Some vases from 2500 BC weren’t Greek, indicating that Olympia was already a trading center by then.

    Mycenaeans were settling here by 1400 BC, and their tombs had lots of pottery. Some of it looks almost contemporary. Archaeologists found many clay or bronze figurines used as votive offerings.

    Another room had weapons and armor, and big bronze cauldrons on tripods. The rims were decorated with winged men, griffins, bulls, etc. One fascinating exhibit contained molds for the garment draperies on statues!

    There ware also clay cups from the workshop of Pheidias, including his own cup with his name on it.

    Hours: 8:30-3, Tues-Sun. Monday, 10:30-5
    Entrance fee is 6 euro, and well worth it.

    Cauldron handles Griffin Nike Blown Glass Painted terra cotta
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  • Museum of Olympia

    by grkboiler Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Across the street from the site of Ancient Olympia is the museum containing many artifacts found at the site including statues, items from Pheidias' workshop, columns, and more.

    Admission is charged. Hours are the same as the ruins: 8am-7pm daily from April to October and 8am-5pm daily from November to March. It is closed on major public holidays.

    Statues
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  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    South baths (Romans)

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Jan 19, 2009

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    In Roman times, the villa of the Roman emperor Nero was added, also the Exedra of Herodes Atticus and Roman baths. During the Roman period the games were opened up to all citizens of the Roman Empire.

    A programme of extensive repairs - including to the Temple of Zeus - and new building took place. In 150 CE the Nympheum (or Exedra) was built. New baths replaced the older Greek examples in 100 CE and an aqueduct constructed in 160 CE.

    You may watch my high resolution photo of Olympia on the Google Earth according to the following coordinates 37º 38' 10.85" N 21º 37' 43.65" E or on my Google Earth Panoramio Olympia Roman's baths.

    Olympia - South baths (Romans) Olympia - South baths (Romans) Olympia - South baths (Romans) Olympia - South baths (Romans) Olympia - South baths (Romans)
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    Philippeion

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Jan 19, 2009

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    The Philippeion in the Altis of Olympia was an Ionic circular memorial of ivory and gold, which contained statues of Philip's family, Alexander the Great, Olympias, Amyntas III and Eurydice II.

    It was made by Athenian sculptor Leochares in celebration of Philip's victory at Battle of Chaeronea (338 BC).

    Olympia - Philippeion
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    Leonidaion

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Jan 19, 2009

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    The Leonidaion was the lodging place for athletes taking part in the Olympic Games at Olympia. It was located at the southwest edge of the sanctuary and was the largest building on the site. It was constructed around 330 BCE and was funded and designed by Leonidas of Naxos.

    The building consisted of four Ionian colonnades with 138 decorated columns, forming a square of approximately 80 metres. In its interior there was a central Doric peristyle with 44 columns.

    You may watch my high resolution photo of Olympia on the Google Earth according to the following coordinates 37º 38' 17.87" N 21º 37' 41.26" E or on my Google Earth Panoramio Olympia Leonidaion.

    Olympia - Leonidaion
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    Metroon

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Jan 19, 2009

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    Metroon was the name given to a building dedicated to the mother goddess, Cybele, Rhea, or Demeter, in Ancient Greece.

    Part of the complex of Olympia, and sited immediately below the terrace which houses the Treasuries, is the late 4th/early 3rd century Metroon.

    You may watch my high resolution photo of Olympia on the Google Earth according to the following coordinates 37º 38' 19.68" N 21º 37' 49.04" E or on my Google Earth Panoramio Olympia Metroon.

    Olympia - Metroon
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    Stadium

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Jan 19, 2009

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    The stadium which could seat at least 20,000 people and was the largest of its kind. Outside the enclosure to the West, was the Stadium with a 45,000 seating capacity (men only were allowed in).

    The first stadium was constructed around 560 BCE, it consisted of just a simple track. The stadium was remodelled around 500 BCE with sloping sides for spectators and shifted slightly to the east. Over the course of the 6th century BCE a range of sports was added to the Olympic festival.

    You may watch my high resolution photo of Olympia on the Google Earth according to the following coordinates 37º 38' 22.85" N 21º 38' 3.00" E or on my Google Earth Panoramio Olympia Stadion.

    Olympia Stadium
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    Crypt

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Jan 19, 2009

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    Access to the Stadium was along a vaulted passage and, to the South, was the Vouleutirion where the Olympic Senate met.

    The entrance to the Stadium from the north-east corner of the Altis was a privileged one, reserved for the judges of the games, the competitors and the heralds. Its form was that of a vaulted tunnel, 100 Olympian feet in length.

    It was probably constructed in Roman times. To the west was a vestibule, from which the Altis was entered by a handsome gateway.

    You may watch my high resolution photo of Olympia on the Google Earth according to the following coordinates or 37º 38' 19.96" N 21º 37' 54.72" E on my Google Earth Panoramio Olympia Crypt 1 and Olympia Crypt 2.

    Olympia - Crypt Olympia - Crypt Olympia - Crypt Olympia - Crypt Olympia - Crypt
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