Knosos Things to Do

  • Knssos
    Knssos
    by draguza
  • Wall painting
    Wall painting
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  • Some of Sir Arthur Evan’s reconstructions
    Some of Sir Arthur Evan’s...
    by grayfo

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    Kaselles and Pithoi

    by grayfo Updated Jan 22, 2006

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    Kaselles and Pithoi

    These were the storage jars "pithoi" for the palace, primarily holding all of the olive oil necessary to light the many oil lamps of the palace. The pits, or "kaselles" were also used to hold oil, as well as precious materials.

    The storage of large quantities of agricultural produce, mainly grain crops, olive oil and wine, was one of the main functions of the palaces of Minoan Crete. Gathered from the surrounding countryside, it was then used or redistributed by the palaces. Through this, they reinforced their control of the island.

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    Knossos Reconstructions

    by grayfo Written Jan 22, 2006

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    Some of Sir Arthur Evan���s reconstructions

    In 1897 British archaeologist Sir Arthur Evans purchased the land on which the site of Knossos was located and spent the rest of his life excavating its remains, but he also did something that would now be considered sacrilegious - he re-built some sections of the palace based on existing knowledge of the Minoan civilisation. The pillars were built based on relief paintings, the size of the pillar bases that were still present and in places the walls were also reconstructed. For visitors today it makes the site more interesting, but it simply wouldn't be allowed these days. The weird thing is that Evans' own reconstructions are themselves being refurbished.

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    The Throne Room of King Minos.

    by grayfo Written Jan 21, 2006

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    The Throne Room

    At the centre of a side wall of the throne room is the gypsum throne of King Minos flanked by stone benches, probably for the priests. The wall painting, (a reconstruction), shows griffins in a field of lilies. The griffen was a mythical animal and the lily is a symbol of royalty. In front of the throne a stone adyton.

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    Temple Tomb

    by draguza Written Oct 16, 2005

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    The Temple entrance

    It is located almost 600 m. to the south of the palace and was connected with the "House of the High Priest" by means of a paved street. It seems that one of the last kings of Knossos (17th-14th centuries B.C.) was buried here. Typical features of its architecture are the hypostyle, two-pillar crypt, the entrance with the courtyard, the portico and a small anteroom.

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    Minoan Palace

    by draguza Written Oct 16, 2005

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    The Royal Villa
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    Knossos contains the ruins of the largest and most luxurious Minoan palace, built in the middle of a large town. The impressive Minoan palace of Knossos is famous throughout the world for its association with the myths of the Minotaur, the Labyrinth, Daedalus, Ikarus and of course of Theseus, and the most ancient cilivisation in Europe. The palace overlooks a small valley through which a stream (called the Kairatos) runs for most of the year. The palace contains roughly one-half-million square feet of floor area, distributed over three to five floors (due to the sloping site), not counting basement storage rooms. It is home to perhaps a thousand people. It has courtyards, reception rooms, apartments for the king and queen, workshops, storerooms, shrines, a whole wing of private apartments. It is a self-contained city in itself. The first palace was built around 2000 B.C. and destroyed around 1700 B.C. The second one was built immediately afterward , more magnificent than the first. This was also destroyed, around 1500 B.C., most likely by the terrible eruption of the volcano on Santorini.

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    Even if there is just replics of frescoes

    by Skipka Updated Oct 17, 2003

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    There is nothing of the frescoes - all are in the Archeological Museum in Heraklion - but it is worth to see the whole area... Here we are three Tauruses :) that one Minoian - the symbol of Knossos king - and me and my mom :)

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    Caravanserai

    by draguza Written Oct 16, 2005

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    Wall painting

    Caravanserai lies to the south of the palace and was interpreted as a reception hall and hospice. Some of the rooms are equipped with baths and decorated with wall paintings.

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    House of the Frescoes

    by draguza Written Oct 16, 2005

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    One of the Frescoes

    The House of the Frescoes is located to the NW of the palace and is a small urban mansion with rich decoration on the walls. Dated to the 15th, 14th-12th centuries B.C.

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