Archaeological Museum, Thessaloniki

4.5 out of 5 stars 7 Reviews

6, M. Andronikou str 2310 / 830538, 2310 / 831037

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  • Archaeological Museum
    by Robin020
  • Archaeological Museum
    by Robin020
  • Archaeological Museum
    by Penelope4
  • mikey_e's Profile Photo

    A Worthwhile Collection

    by mikey_e Written Jul 2, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Sarcophogus outside the Archeological Museum

    Although Lonely Planet suggested that this museum was lacklustre, it was likely only the effect of having visited the Museum of Byzantine Culture just before coming to the Archeological Museum. The collection here is very large and many of the pieces could probably be removed to allow the visitor more time to digest what she sees. Nevertheless, the exhibits are well devised to give the viewer an idea of different aspects of life in Macedonia and Thessaloniki in the pre-Byzantine eras, both Hellenistic and Roman. Rooms focus on economics, home life, war, governance and death. There is also the spectacular exhibit of the Gold of Macedonia, which houses many gold objects excavated from burial sites around Macedonia. The basement of the museum has a rather boring exhibit on the pre-historic finds in Macedonia, but it is also used for the biennale of contemporary art, which adds a bit of pizazz (if you're in Thessaloniki during the biennale, June-September of odd numbered years).

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  • Archaeological Museum of Thessaloniki

    by dimilag Written May 27, 2007

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    The Archaeological Museum of Thessaloniki was build in February 1961. The building
    was inaugurated on 27th October 1962, during the celebrations of the fiftieth
    anniversary of the liberation of Thessaloniki. In 1971, the displays were brought to
    completion in all the rooms. They included sculpture, a prehistoric collection, miniature
    art of the Archaic and Classical periods, and the brilliant group of finds from the tombs
    at Derveni, which was first presented to the public on the day of the inauguration
    ceremony. A few years later, in 1978, the astonishing discoveries at Vergina led to
    the first changes in the display: finds from the royal tombs were exhibited in the rooms
    housing the prehistoric collection and miniature art as part of the exhibition "Treasures of Ancient Macedonia". The treasures from Vergina, and other precious discoveries of the 70's, made the construction of an extension to the Museum inevitable: the new wing was inaugaurated in July 1980 with the exhibition "Alexander the Great". This same year saw the begininng of the excavation of the cemetey at Sindos, with its rich finds of gold, and the "Sindos" exhibition was opened to the public in October 1982. There followed in 1984 a repeat of the exhibition of finds from Vergina and Derveni, in 1985 an exhibition on ancient Thessaloniki, and in 1989 an exhibition of new finds dating from the Archaic and Classical periods at the ground floor of the New Wing.

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    • Archeology
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    Archeological Museum

    by GeoDenia Written Jun 19, 2006

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    It includes sculpture, a prehistoric collection, miniature art of the Archaic and Classical periods, and the brilliant group of finds from the tombs at Derveni, which was first presented to the public on the day of the inauguration ceremony.
    There're also the royal tombs which were exhibited in the rooms housing the prehistoric collection and miniature art as part of the exhibition “Treasures of Ancient Macedonia”.

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    • Archeology

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    Archaeological Museum

    by DrexelDragon Written Feb 21, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Decent displays. Kinda small. I thought it was going to have more than it did, and I think it probably is smaller compared to the displays at the Royal Tombs in Veiria. Also, don't be fooled by the center atrium. There's nothing down there except the bathrooms, and the wings to the left and right are also void of displays. You start by going to the obvious entrance to the left after walking past the reception area. The visit can be done in an hour with a good mix of just browsing, observing, and reading of artifacts' descriptions.

    I was most impressed with the large, decorative funeral urn. I also enjoyed the beginning displays that discussed the craftmanship that went into manufacturing gold jewelry and items and the process of gilding.

    There's a small gift shop, but it had mostly expensive items. Nothing interested me enough to make a purchase.

    GO ON SUNDAYS...IT'S FREE!!!

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  • StefanosS's Profile Photo

    Archaeological Museum

    by StefanosS Updated Oct 9, 2003

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    The Crater of Derveni

    The Archaeological Museum hosts important findings of the area. Here is a cooper vessel used for mixing the wine. On its side there is a representation of Dionyssos and Ariadni with a group of their companions dancing in ecstasy. This article, dated at 330 BC, is named "The Crater of Derveni".

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    Archaeological Museum

    by StefanosS Updated Oct 9, 2003

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    High art mosaic floor

    An artistic mosaic floor found in an ancient mansion, presenting Dionyssos and Ariadni, about 200 AD. Now it is housed in the archaeological museum of Thessaloniki.

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    Archaeological Museum

    by StefanosS Updated Oct 9, 2003

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    Aphrodite's statue

    A high art Roman copy of an older statue: Aphrodite (Venus) dressed in a delicate robe revealing a perfect body. The original was of the 5th century BC.

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    • Archeology
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