Lindos Things to Do

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    The "Sawmill"
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    The Church
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    St Paul's Bay Lindos
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Most Recent Things to Do in Lindos

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    The Acropolis.

    by Maurizioago Updated May 21, 2014

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    I wasn' t impressed by this fortress. Perhaps because I know very little about ancient history.

    The acropolis is built on a rock overlooking Lindos. It is surrounded by well preserved walls built by the knights (and later restored). Inside the walls you can see several remains of ancient temples. They were restored by the Italians during their occupation of the island. Today this site is still under construction. It is said the restoration done by the Italians wasn' t properly done.

    I enjoyed much the landscape from the acropolis. You can see most of the town from there.

    There are two ways to reach the acropolis. One is by climbing lots of stairs. Another is going there by donkey.

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    ACROPOLIS

    by balhannah Updated Nov 20, 2013

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    In times gone by the Acropolis of Lindos was dominated by the massive temple of Athena Lindia, which attained its final form in around 300 BC. In Hellenistic and Roman times the temple precinct grew as more buildings were added.

    A massive fortress was built on the acropolis by the Knights of St John to defend the island against the Ottomans.
    The Castle of the Knights of St John, built some time before 1317 on the foundations of older Byzantine fortifications. The walls and towers follow the natural conformation of the cliff. A pentagonal tower on the south side commanded the harbour, the settlement and the road from the south of the island. There was a large round tower on the east facing the sea and two more, one round and the other on a corner, on the northeast side . Today one of the towers at the southwest corner and one to the west survive.
    You can definitely see that this was a prime position for a Castle.

    Some scenes of the well-known film, The Guns of Navarone, were filmed here.

    I was a little disappointed with the Acropolis. I just expected more!
    The views were fantastic, and that was certainly worth while.

    ADMISSION IN 2013 is 6 euros
    For persons above 65 years old and citizens from the European Union: 3 euros
    CLOSED MONDAYS IN WINTER
    Opening Hours: Winter season: 8.15- 2.40PM
    Summer season: 8:00- 7:40PM , Monday 8.00-2.40pm

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    DORMITION OF THE HOLY MOTHER OF GOD

    by balhannah Updated Nov 20, 2013

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    The Church

    This is the main Church of Lindos. On the ground before the entranceway is one of Lindos' distinctive mosaic pavements made of alternating black and white river pebbles..
    It is located amongst narrow alley ways and shops. As you enter the courtyard the Bell tower is on the left. Climb up the steps for a photo. This is a cross-shaped building with an octagonal dome, whitewashed walls, and red tiled roof. It was built by the Knights in the 14th century and is especially notable for its magnificent interior frescoes.
    Every inch of wall space is covered in beautiful frescoes, done in the 1700's. They depict Biblical scenes and a Christian imagery of Mary, Jesus and the saints. In the front of the church is the spectacular carved wooden iconostasis. From overhead hang large bronze layered candle chandeliers.
    Over the doorway as you walk out, look up, here you will see a huge colorful fresco with the story of The Last Judgment. Twisting bodies writhe together in the orange and red flames of hell.

    Photography is not allowed, what a shame.
    There is a Museum here as well charging a small admission fee.

    OPEN 7am to 7pm daily

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  • UPDATE: TRACKING DOWN CHARACTERS IN A NOVEL

    by lindoslady Written Nov 9, 2012
    St Paul's Bay Lindos

    The aforementioned new novel set in Lindos called From Lindos with Love is now available on Amazon.co.uk or Amazon.com Although the characters visiting the village are fictitious, the bars and restaurants where those characters hang out and the owners of those bars and restaurants are real. You can read the book in the actual places where the action takes place. Facebook page From Lindos with Love has info and pics about Rhodes and Lindos life/history etc.

    Read more: http://www.virtualtourist.com/travel/Europe/Greece/Prefecture_of_the_Dodecanese_Islands/Lindos-428052/Things_To_Do-Lindos-TG-C-1.html#tip=2232560#ixzz2BjSRZNRT

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  • Based in Lindos but touring the island

    by lindoslady Updated Jun 6, 2012
    Rhodes

    Local buses are aplenty and going to most places of interest but they can get very, very crowded and you might get stuck standing all the way from Lindos to Rhodes Town, however they are air conditioned. When it comes to getting aboard it is every person for themselves so don't be overly polite! It costs about 5 euros from Lindos to Rhodes for example, usually you have to get your ticket from the kiosk but they will accept payment on the bus and you get a tour through the local villages inc in the price. Drivers are usually very helpful and announce the main hotels as they are coming up so people generally get off at the right place. Don't wait to catch the last bus back or you may not get on - the buses do not run late at night. The bus terminal in Rhodes is near the harbour and 3 mins from the Old Town so you shouldn't get lost on a day out. If you have buggies or large luggage you should store it in the luggage compartment underneath (accessed from outside)-you usually have to do this yourself.Expect the driver to be smoking and or on the 'phone occasionally, it is a stressful job but they normally do it well and in several different languages.

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  • Track down characters in a novel

    by lindoslady Updated Jun 6, 2012

    There is a new novel set in Lindos called From Lindos with Love available on www.lulu.com . Although the characters visiting the village are fictitious, the bars and restaurants where those characters hang out and the owners of those bars and restaurants are real. You can read the book in the actual places where the conversations take place.

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  • Maurizioago's Profile Photo

    The churches tour.

    by Maurizioago Updated Aug 12, 2010

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    There are some small churches in Lindos, beside the main one. The only opportunity to see their interiors is to join a tour which takes place several days every week, at 10 a. m. The meeting place for this tour (only for small groups) is behind the main church; turn right and wait in front at the house n. 99.

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    The Church of St George Pachymachiotes

    by balhannah Written Jul 24, 2009

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    The

    This is the oldest church in Lindos, dating from the 12th century. It is cruciform in a 'cross-in-square' style, and as with many Lindos churches, the town has been built up around it. You can't go inside as it is kept locked, so enjoy the outside views to the Beach.

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  • Maurizioago's Profile Photo

    The church of Panagia.

    by Maurizioago Updated Jul 20, 2009

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    Probably it was built in the 14th century. It was restored in 1489. Inside it is completely decorated with frescoes painted in 1779. The floor is covered with small white and black peebles. This kind of decoration is called “coclaki”.

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  • Snipernurse's Profile Photo

    Acropolis of Lindos

    by Snipernurse Written Jun 29, 2008

    The acropolis of Lindos is definately worth the bus ride across the island from Rhodes. With some very interesting ruins and a view of the Bay of St. Paul (where they believed he crashed landed onto Rhodes) it makes for an interesting trip. The temple was said to be built in 6th century B.C.

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    TEMPLE OF ATHENA LINDIA

    by jessy&tessa Written Jul 19, 2007

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    The temple was erected on the highest point of the acropolis in the fourth or early third century B.C. on the site where the archaic temple, belived to have been destroyed by fire in 392 B.C., previously stood. it is an amphiprostyle structure in the doric order, built of local calcareous sandstone and plastered with stucco like all the others buildings on the acropolis. In the interior, where valuable votive offerings to the goddess were stored, the spot where her statue once stood is still visible. From the ancient temple the krepis (podium) of the opisthodomos ( room to the rear of the temple), a large section of the west wall and a smaller one of the east wall are preserved in situ. In 1936-1938 the colonnades of both ends and part of the side walls of the temple were restored. From 2000 to 2005 restoration works were executed during which the original height of the monument wasrestored and the ancient threshold was completed and placed in its original place.

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  • Panagia (Chruch of Our Lady)

    by jayhawk2000 Updated Apr 15, 2007

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    Bell tower
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    'No photo, no camera, no photo' is the mantra chanted in this 15th century church. Unlike remote chapels where you can sneak a snap or two, the attendants here keep a sharp eye out for any offending photography. Which is a shame, because it is highly decorated and has one of the best patterned pebble 'hokhlaki' floors we'd seen.

    The icons looked brand new in comparison to other churches we'd visited, but apparently these were done in the 18th century by an artist from the neighbouring island of Symi. Male and female saints are segregated to either side of the altar.

    So here's a picture of the church towers from the courtyard...it's a lovely spot with flowers spilling across the white washed walls. And they can't stop you from taking photos here.

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  • Lindos acropolis

    by jayhawk2000 Updated Aug 24, 2006

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    Temple columns
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    A great rock column over 300 feet high commands the coastline above Lindos. For over two thousand years it's been a focus of the community and retains traces of fortress walls, temple columns and a ruined church.

    The authorities are busy correcting the work of the Italians who set about rebuilding the place in concrete, so there's some scaffolding and machinery to contend with in spots.

    Try to go as early or late as you can in the day when it's cooler and there are fewer crowds although the space is immense and absorbs the tourists easily. I believe it opens at 8 most days, except Monday when it's not accessible till after noon.

    Adult admission at the time was 6 euros each and the views alone are worth the price. You will see below you the Lindos rooftops, an ancient amphitheatre, the famous crescent beach and a harbour full of excursion boats.

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    Go to Acropolis

    by miman Written Jul 25, 2006

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    Lindos Acropolis

    On the acropolis of Lindos today parts of the following buildings may still be seen:
    The Doric Temple of Athena Lindia, dating from about 300 BC, built on the site of an earlier temple. Inside the temple is the table of offerings and the base of the cult statue of Athena.
    The Propylaea of the Sanctuary, also dating from the 4th century BC. A monumental staircase leads to a D-shaped stoa and a wall with five door openings.
    The Hellenistic stoa with lateral projecting wings, dating from about 200 BC. The stoa is 87 metres long and consisted of 42 columns.
    The famous relief of a Rhodian trireme (warship) cut into the rock at the foot of the steps leading to the acropolis. On the bow stood a statue of General Hagesander, the work of the sculptor Pythokritos, who also carved the Winged Victory of Samothrace. The relief dates from about 180 BC.
    The Hellenistic staircase (2nd century BC) leading to the main archaeological area of the acropolis.
    Remains of a Roman Temple, possibly dedicated to the Emperor Diocletian and dating from about 300 AD.
    The Acropolis is surrounded by a Hellenistic wall contemporary with the Propylaea and the stairway leading to the entrance to the site. A Roman inscription says that the wall and square towers were repaired at the expense of P Aelius Hagetor, the priest of Athena in the 2nd century AD.
    The Castle of the Knights of St John, built some time before 1317 on the foundations of older Byzantine fortifications. The walls and towers follow the natural conformation of the cliff. A pentagonal tower on the south side commanded the harbour, the settlement and the road from the south of the island. There was a large round tower on the east facing the sea and two more, one round and the other on a corner, on the northeast side of the enceinte. Today one of the towers at the southwest corner and one to the west survive.
    The Greek Orthodox Church of St John, dating from the 13th or 14th century and built on the ruins of a previous church, which may have been built as early as the 6th century.

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    Go to beach in Lindos

    by miman Written Jul 25, 2006

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    Lindos

    Follow the sign for the beach and you'll find yourself at the left-hand end, while if you go straight down below the Acropolis, down Pallas St., you will find yourself at the right hand end, known as Pallas Beach. Basically they are two different beaches sharing the same bay. Sun beds everywhere, umbrellas, tavernas. Sand and the water is shallow and ideal for young children.

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