Rhodes (Island) Local Customs

  • Small church in the Castle at Archangelos
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Most Recent Local Customs in Rhodes (Island)

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    High Parrot Count

    by SallyM Written Aug 30, 2008

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    Macaws in Rhodes Town

    One thing that surprised me about Rhodes was the number of parrots we saw, mostly outside restaurants (perhaps they weren't allowed in...!).

    We ended up keeping a daily parrot count for the holiday.

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    Invited out by a Greek

    by Balam Written Jun 25, 2008

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    If a Greek invites you out for dinner or a drink, don't EVER try to make him "split the bill in half" as we often do here in Northern Europe. I know some tourists who wanted to be nice to their host for the evening, and they snapped the bill out of his hand and paid it. Never has a friendship been that close to ruin, and the Greek man was more embarrassed than you could ever imagine!

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    Entering a Greek Church or Monastery

    by Balam Written Jun 25, 2008

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    If you want to see a Greek church or monastery inside, you must be properly dressed. It's considered rude to enter a church if your shoulders and knees aren't covered. This rule goes for both men and women. So if you as a tourist wants to be polite against the country you're visiting, have this in mind.

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    GMT-Time

    by Balam Written Jun 25, 2008

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    In Greece you much live with the GMT-time, and in this case GMT is an abbreviation for "Greek Maybe Time". The Greek people have a very different attitude to time. When the bus is scheduled to come 10.30, it will come between 10 and 11, depending on the traffic, how many people the driver had met and felt he should talk with, and many other small things. Or a local might tell you that the bus will arrive AFTER 4 p.m.! Then he hasn't promised too much. The Greek people don't live by the clock. The Greeks also have a different opinion about when it's morning, afternoon and evening. You say Good Morning until 12. If you have agreed to meet in the 'afternoon', the earliest meant by this will be 6.00 p.m.! In Greece, the evening meal begins no earlier than 9.00 p.m. Also no one will think anything of it if you telephone at 10.00 p.m. in the evening. However, 'siesta' time, between 3.00 p.m. and 5 p.m. is held as sacred. During the siesta, though, it is very unpopular to disturb someone

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    Paying for a Sun Bed

    by Balam Written Jun 25, 2008

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    At most beaches you will have to pay for a sun bed and an umbrella. If you think that it is just people trying to get money out of the tourists you're very wrong. It's a job in Greece having a piece of a beach. A man seeks for a particular part of the beach each year, and he pays a sum of money, to be allowed to put up his sun beds and umbrellas. During the season it's now his responsibility, that this part of the beach is kept properly. The price you pay will depend on where the beach is situated, what kind of facilities (taverna, toilets, showers) there are. The tourist police checks that he does his job properly

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    The Greek Priest

    by Balam Written Jun 25, 2008

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    You see the Greek priest - or pappas, as they are called - everywhere, as you can't miss them in their long, black dress and high hat. They are not obliged to wear their priest clothes all the time, but they do, as it's most practical and they are easier to identify this way. The Greek priests can marry and have children, just like in the Lutheran church. But you will never see a woman priest. This is not allowed by the Greek Orthodox Church.

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    Small Shrines

    by Balam Written Jun 25, 2008

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    The miniature churches or shrines next to the roads are memorials for people killed in a car accident, at the same spot where the accident happened. The family of the deceased construct and maintain them . They contain a photo of the deceased, some religious objects and a lit candle.

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    Churches

    by Balam Written Jun 25, 2008

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    Small church in the Castle at Archangelos

    Churches = ekklisies. The big churches are inside the towns but the numerous small ones are practically everywhere. Usually white-painted, you will find them on a beach, on the mountain peaks, in deep gorges or inside caves. People of Rhodes are deeply religious people and they build churches to express their gratitude to God or to fulfil a "tama", a promise given to God in exchange for a request.

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    Xanthies touristries

    by Balam Written Jun 25, 2008

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    Xanthies touristries, blonde tourist women. Highly appreciated by the "kamakia", the young hot-blooded Greek lovers. Love stories between men of Rhodes and tourists are common each year. Most of them are just summer loves but a few marriages come out of them also. The result is the many european women living in Rhodes, mostly German, Dutch and Scandinavian. Be aware though, that having a romantic love affair during your holiday is one thing and living in Rhodes married to a Rhodean man is totally different. The cultural differences are many and it is very important not to ignore them.

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    Numbers, Colours and Countries

    by Balam Written Jun 24, 2008

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    In all the following, "e" is read as in "egg" and "th" is read as in "this". The emphasis in pronunciation falls on the syllable which is in underlined script

    ena = one

    thio = two

    tria = three

    tessera = four

    pente = five

    eksi = six

    epta or efta = seven

    okto = eight

    ennia = nine

    theka = ten

    entheka = eleven

    thotheka = twelve

    theka-tria = thirteen

    theka-tessera = 14

    theka-pente = 15

    theka-eksi = 16

    theka-epta = 17

    theka-okto = 18

    theka-ennia = 19

    eikossi = 20

    eikossi-ena = 21
    trianta = 30

    ssaranta = 40

    peninta = 50

    eksinta = 60

    evthominta = 70

    ogthonta = 80

    eneninta = 90

    ekato = 100

    ekaton theka pente = 115

    ekaton peninta tria = 153

    thiakossia = 200

    triakossia = 300

    tetrakossia = 400

    pentakossia = 500

    eksakossia = 600

    eptakossia = 700

    oktakossia = 800

    eniakossia = 900

    hilia = 1000

    ena ekatomirio = one million

    ena thisekatomirio = one billion


    Learn the colours in Greek


    Greek Colours

    aspro, lefko = white

    mavro = black

    kokkino = red

    mple = blue

    kitrino = yellow

    prassino = green

    kafe = brown

    mov = purple

    galazio = light blue


    Countries

    Alvania = Albania

    Ameriki = USA

    Anglia = England

    Finlanthia = Finland

    Gallia = France

    Iaponia = Japan

    Ispania = Spain

    Italia = Italy

    Kanathas = Canada

    Kina = China

    Norviyia = Norway

    Ollanthia = Holland

    Polonia = Polland

    Rossia = Russia

    Souithia = Sweden

    Thania = Denmark

    Tourkia = Turkey

    Velyio = Belgium

    Voulgaria = Bulgaria

    Yermania = Germany

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    Gesture's

    by Balam Written Jun 24, 2008

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    Greeks are known as champion gesture users in the Mediterranean. Their hands, bodies and faces are rarely still and it sometimes seems possible to get the gist of a conversation by watching it from 50 meters away.

    Instead of shaking heads from side to side as we do, they have another indescribable way of saying "No". This is done by raising the entire head in a backwards movement and clicking the tongue. Sometimes these movements are too subtle and quick, and you can't be too sure that he/she's answered at all. You can repeat the question again and again, and find he/she's been saying "No" from the very beginning.

    "Yes"
    A slow down movement of the head to one side, slightly closing the eyes as the head is lowered.

    "Come here"
    This gesture is indicated by the wawing of the hand, a kind of pawing of the air with the fingers and the palm downwards, that looks to the non-Greek as though he/she is either waving good-bye, or telling you to move back a few steps.
    This can be confusing, because the further you move back, the more frantic the gesture becomes.

    "I want to tell you something"
    This gesture is done by touching or patting the lower lip with the index finger, and can easily be misunderstood, as it looks as if you are being told to be quiet. This gesture is often performed immediately after the "Come here" gesture - and put together they simply mean "Come here, I want to tell you something".

    "What do you want / what do you mean?"
    With a quizzical expression in his/her eyes, the Greek will shake his/her head from side to side a few times. This normally means that he/she either hasn't understood what you've asked, and is asking you to repeat it, or he/she is asking you what you want.

    "Thank you very much my friend"
    The "Yes" gesture is followed by putting the right hand to the heart. Standing in front of the person, the gesture is of course followed by a verbal statement. But the gesture can also be performed at some distance.

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    Mythos

    by Balam Written Jun 6, 2008

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    Mythos Beer

    Mythos beer was launched in Greece in 1997 and has gone from strength to strength. Mythos is produced from specially selected varieties of barley and hops, it is a lager with a rich head, blonde colour and a pleasant refreshing taste.

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    Easter in Greece

    by Balam Written Apr 8, 2008

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    Inside Church
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    Will you be able to celebrate Greek Orthodox Easter in Greece on your trip?

    If you're lucky enough to be traveling in Greece during the Greek Orthodox Easter weekend, you'll have an opportunity to experience all of the rich pageantry and deep religious devotion expressed by the Greeks at Eastertime

    Here are enough Greek Easter dates to keep the most avid advance planner happy, from 2008 to 2023.
    Every few years, "Western" (Catholic and Protestant) Easter and Greek Orthodox Easter coincide; these years are indicated by (same) following the date.

    2008 - Easter Sunday - April 27th
    2009 - Easter Sunday - April 19th
    2010 - Easter Sunday - April 4th (same)
    2011 - Easter Sunday - April 24th (same)
    2012 - Easter Sunday - April 15th
    2013 - Easter Sunday - May 5th
    2014 - Easter Sunday - April 20th (same)
    2015 - Easter Sunday - April 12th
    2016 - Easter Sunday - May 1st
    2017 - Easter Sunday - April 16th (same)
    2018 - Easter Sunday - April 8th
    2019 - Easter Sunday - April 28th
    2020 - Easter Sunday - April 19th
    2021 - Easter Sunday - May 2nd
    2022 - Easter Sunday - April 24th
    2023 - Easter Sunday - April 16th

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    Stifado, My favorite

    by Balam Written Mar 3, 2008

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    Stifado

    A Stifado is a meaty stew with beef and baby shallot onions. The best part is the thick sauce which is made slightly sweet by the onions.
    serves 4-6)

    You will need

    1Kg lean beef - cubed.
    500g baby shallot onions - peeled.
    1 large onions chopped.
    1 large juicy tomatoes - chopped.
    2 table-spoons of tomato paste.
    1/2 nutmeg crushed (put it into a bag and hit it with a rolling pin!)
    1 cinnamon stick and 3 cloves.
    4 garlic cloves - finely chopped.
    1 vegetable stock cube (optional)
    Rosemary sprig or two.
    1 small wineglass of extra-virgin olive oil.
    1 glass of red or white wine.
    2 table-spoons of vinegar.
    Fresh coarsely ground black pepper and salt.

    1. Add the beef to large frying pan or casserole dish. Place on a high heat, stirring occasionally until meat is sealed.

    2. Add the olive oil, chopped onions and garlic. Continue cooking on a high heat, until the onions have turned soft. (About 5mins)

    3. Add wine and vinegar, leave on heat but covered for another 5 mins.

    4. Next nutmeg, cinnamon, cloves, bay leaves, rosemary, stock cube and a good pinch of black pepper. Keep stirring while the ingredients blend, on a moderate heat. Add salt to taste.

    5. Keep heating while adding the chopped tomatoes and tomato paste.

    6. Turn out into a casserole dish (Terracota), with lid. Add 1 litre of hot water so as to cover the meat. Cook in oven until the meat is nearly cooked - about one hour.

    7. While waiting, peel the baby shallot onions, wash them and shallow fry them in a little olive oil, until soft, not letting them burn.

    8. Add the shallots (but not the oil) to the simmering meat and leave in the oven until the meat is thoroughly cooked (soft and tender) - at least another hour - add water if needed (don't let it dry out), so that you end up with a rich thick sauce.

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    Dining

    by Balam Written Mar 1, 2008

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    Good food and drink certainly contribute to Your enjoyment of a holiday on Rhodes, Rhodian food is a combination of Greek imagination and European and Middle Eastern taste.
    restaurants serve international as well as Greek cuisine, There are also many Indian and Chinese restaraunts.

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Rhodes (Island) Local Customs

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