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  • mediamind's Profile Photo

    Official Web Site of Budapest Tourism

    by mediamind Updated Jul 31, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: http://www.budapestinfo.hu/index.php?id=home_en
    This is the official site of Budapest Tourism. It belongs to the non-profit organisation of Budapest Tourist Office, so you won't find less crappy ads on it, like on other city websites.

    General information about traveling in and around, weather, sights and news about current events. You basically find almost everything you want to know.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Luxury Travel
    • Family Travel

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  • katalin's Profile Photo

    Castlegarden Palace

    by katalin Updated Jul 9, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: It was built 1875-79 by Miklós Ybl. Originally this is a waterworks building 1881-1905. From 1905 it was cafe. From 1913 it was bandstand. After the II. World War it had more ovnership change. From 1992-2007 it was elegant casino (Várkert Casino). Today it is venues of events.

    Address: 1013 Budapest, Ybl Miklós square 9.
    www.varkert-palota.hu

    main entrance view from Buda quay
    Related to:
    • Business Travel
    • Festivals

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  • antistar's Profile Photo

    Navigating Budapest: Moscow Square

    by antistar Updated May 28, 2011

    Favorite thing: Moskva Ter was one of the few communist flavoured place names to survive the transition to democracy, but will now change its name to the incredibly forgettable Szell Kalman Ter. It's the big concrete centre of Buda, and not a pretty sight. Most of the square is made up of the metro and tram station. The station is usually filled with beggars and sorry looking drunks, but is so busy that you'll rarely get any trouble. Around Moscow Square you'll find a few decent restaurants, like Marxim the communist themed pizza place. There's also the huge Mammut shopping centre, which is one of the best and most easily accessed of Budapest's malls.

    It's not the nicest part of Budapest, but if you want to get to the castle, or see any of the other sights in Buda, you'll probably have to pass through here at some point.

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  • antistar's Profile Photo

    Navigating Budapest: Deak Ter

    by antistar Updated May 28, 2011

    Favorite thing: All roads lead to Deak Ferenc Ter. This is about as central as it gets in the twin city of Buda and Pest. Every one of the three metro lines runs through here, and the old bus depot used to sit here under Erzsebet Ter next door. Deak Ter and Erzsebet Ter are twins, with Deak being the big, bustly underground and Erzsebet being the pleasant, green park.

    It's one of the most expensive parts of Budapest, and the classy Korvin Hotel is nearby, overlooking Erzsebet. But it's also a bit bohemian: the excellent Godor club has overtaken the old bus depot and turned into a top music venue. Every night in the summer crowds of young people hang out in Erszebet drinking and having fun. It's very chilled. The nearby Match supermarket can't cope with the amount of alcohol being bought.

    Everything important fans out from Deak Ter: North is Nyugati Station, North East is Andrassy Ut and Heroes Square, East is Keleti Station and the National Museum, West is the Chain Bridge and Buda, and south is the heart of District V, the most expensive and most central of Budapest's districts.

    Deak Ter, Budapest

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  • antistar's Profile Photo

    Navigating Budapest: Blaha Lujza Ter

    by antistar Updated May 28, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: If you believe the locals, Blaha Lujza Ter is possibly the most dangerous square in all of Budapest. It is grim, and there are some dodgy characters about, but I've wandered around here at all hours. It's not so bad, but you should be careful. Just as an idea of the characters that hang out here, Blaha Lujza ter was made famous recently by a you tube video of the antics of a Romanian gypsy orphan who robbed and stabbed people while laughing all the time. The news reported he'd been sent home, but people think he will come back.

    But Blaha Lujza is the most happening square in District 8, the infamous ghetto. You probably won't want to come here as a tourist, except maybe to see the grand New York Hotel. But if you want to catch a glimpse of Budapest's best bohemian bars, you'll find yourself drawn here like a magnet. Bars like the excellent Corvin Tetto, the roof top summer bar on the old communist department store, are directly on Blaha Lujza, but other great places, like the jazzy, Serbian Jelen, and the ever popular Szimpla are both nearby.

    Corvin Department Store, Blaha Lujza Ter Blaha Lujza Ter, Budapest

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  • Raimix's Profile Photo

    Modern architecture

    by Raimix Updated Mar 4, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Hungary and both capital Budapest becomes higher and higher in economy and lot of business class buildings are appearing. The biggest impression for me is that some of these buildings are with unique architecture, as building shown in my picture.

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  • johngayton's Profile Photo

    Andrassy utca - Hungarian Egalitarianism!!

    by johngayton Updated Feb 8, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: I just love that Andrassy is called an "utca" - utca simply means "street". It says something about a city when one of its UNESCO listed sites has such a common appellation as simple as a "street".

    And a street it is, it's the street that connects the utilitarian transport intersection of Deak Ferenc ter, where the three Metros meet, to the equally egalitarian City Park, where locals congregate at the first hint of good weather. It's a pretty magnificent street (and magnificently pretty) as it sets off from the city bordered by some of the most exclusive shops before heading onwards towards the culture offered by the State Opera House and a couple of surrounding Szinhaz's.

    Having caught its bit of "high culture" it then arrives at the Oktogon, surrounded on all eight sides by bars, restaurants, little shops and even fast-food takeaways. But then one has to bear in mind that "high culture" in Budapest is in fact literal - with opera tickets starting from 500 Forints the culture is "high" without being exclusive.

    After Oktogon the street widens and becomes an almost exclusive enclave of the wealthy with its garden-fronted mansions and elegant townhouses but it is still not exclusive-exclusive. By now you have tree-lined promenades not only on both sides of the road but also right down the middle with the Metro following your footsteps a few metres under them.

    Andrassy was built as a functional radial route in and out of the city. Construction commenced in 1872 and its inauguration was in 1876, timed to coincide with the 20th August national holiday. The rich and famous of the time bought and built on both sides of this simple street and commissioned some of the best examples of Budapest's rich architectural heritage. Maybe this was a crafty plan on behalf of the city planners as soon afterwards they got the funding to build the first Continental European Metro under the street so as to reduce the traffic noise.

    Fondest memory: Anywhere else in Europe this would have been called a "Boulevard" and maybe even a "Grande" one at that but not so here in Budapest. That's something that endears me to this city - as if it was socialist long before Socialism was spelled with a capital "S" and despite the post-war Communist idea of what Socialism should be as soon as Communism was kicked out socialism was regained - "Paprika Socialism" - rich and smooth and always affordable provided you don't buy the stuff in the fancy packets.

    The Street!
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Beer Tasting
    • Photography

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  • johngayton's Profile Photo

    Danube Flooding

    by johngayton Updated Feb 8, 2011

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    Favorite thing: This is something you don't have to worry about as the Danube has been flooding in the area since time immemorial. During Budapest's 19th century development the city's planners had the foresight to ensure that its flood defences were more than adequate and able to cope with water levels rising by up to 10 metres. The highest recorded river rise was 8.6 metres in 2006 and so there was still plenty of leeway.

    There are a couple of roadways which have been constructed along the river which are below the flood defence level but that simply creates an inconvenience for motorists and the public transport system is barely affected.

    No Riverside Walk Today! But Plenty Of Leeway For The City Itself
    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Photography
    • Budget Travel

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  • johngayton's Profile Photo

    Street Signs and Maps

    by johngayton Updated Feb 8, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: In its entirety Budapest stretches for about 28 km along the banks of the Danube but most of the places of tourist interest are centrally-located and easily accessed on foot or by short journeys using the excellent public transport system.

    Within the city centre there's plenty of signposts giving directions to nearby places of interest and most of the Metro stations, railway stations and other strategic points have useful city maps. These maps are also available from the various "Tourinform" offices.

    The streets themselves are well-signed and usually the streetsign also includes the district, the building numbers, and the direction thereof.

    If you do get temporarily lost you'll find the locals particularly helpful with directions, and especially if you pop into a bar and buy a drink before asking for assistance ;)

    City Centre Signpost at Deak Streetmap at Oktogon Metro Map Showing Local Attractions at Oktogon Typical Streetsign
    Related to:
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    • Beer Tasting
    • Hiking and Walking

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  • johngayton's Profile Photo

    Don't Forget To Look Down!

    by johngayton Written Jan 28, 2011

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    Favorite thing: Whilst Budapest has some grandly-ornate buildings it's also worth keeping an eye on what's at your feet. Around the city centre you'll notice these decorative manhole covers which I think are those of the local electricity company.

    For a few more examples visit this page: Manhole Miscellany

    Manhole Cover On Vaci Utca
    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Beer Tasting

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  • antistar's Profile Photo

    Money

    by antistar Updated Jan 11, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: The currency of Hungary is the Forint. As a rough guide, there are 280 Forints to the Euro, 210 Forints to the US Dollar, and 325 Forints to the pound. The forint has been very unstable, however, since the financial crisis, falling from 250 to the euro, down to 330, before bouncing back to the 270-290 region. So don't trust my numbers!

    Hungary is a relatively cheap place to visit, especially outside of Budapest. There have been some huge bargains on the hotel front since the economic collapse of 2008. Food and transport is particularly cheap, except the metro system in the capital, which charges Western European rates for a substandard service with only one ride per ticket. A main dish at a reasonable restaurant generally costing less than 10 euros.

    The low prices of everything means that big notes can be difficult to dispose of, and the ATMs, which are all over the city, tend to give out the biggest notes possible. I had real problems getting anyone to accept the 10000 Forint note, worth about 40 euros, and I couldn't even spend a 5000 Forint note (about 20 euros) in a place as big and international as Burger King, so good luck spending the bigger notes in the small family run restaurants.

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  • antistar's Profile Photo

    Navigating Budapest: Kalvin Ter

    by antistar Written Jan 1, 2011

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    Favorite thing: On the southern end of District V you'll find the up and coming Kalvin square. Once the renovations have been completed, the square will be one of the best in Budapest. Right now it should be on your radar for a number of great bars and restaurants, as well as being the starting point for the famous Raday Utca, a pleasant pedestrianised street filled with bars, restaurants and boutique shops. You've also got the National History museum right next door.

    Kalvin Ter, Budapest Kalvin Ter, Budapest Kalvin Ter, Budapest

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  • antistar's Profile Photo

    Navigating Budapest: Nyugati Ter

    by antistar Updated Jan 1, 2011

    Favorite thing: Even though it's north of the centre, Nyugati Ter means "West Square". The confusion lies in the naming of the train stations which the square serves. Like most of Budapest's squares, there's little walking space available, but it does have an enormous underground square. It's like nothing else in Budapest: it has shops, restaurants, and lots of small market stalls. But it's also grim, littered with drunks and prostitutes, and best avoided late at night.

    What you will find here is the fantastic looking Nyugati station, designed by Eiffel himself. It's useful mostly for destinations inside Hungary. There's also the excellent West End shopping centre. There's nothing much touristic beyond Nyugati, so if you've come this far, jump on the metro and head back into the city.

    The name looks difficult, but the pronunciation is somewhat like "new-gatti".

    Nyugati Square, Budapest

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  • azz8206's Profile Photo

    Vajdahunyad Castle

    by azz8206 Written Oct 18, 2010

    Favorite thing: Vajdahunyad Castle is located behind Hosok Ter. in the City Park. It was built between 1896 and 1908 and is a replica of a castle in Transylvania, Romania. It borrows from different architectural styles such as Romanic, Gothic, Renaissance and Baroque. You will find the Agricultural Museum inside.
    Right across from the castle is the Church of the 12 Disciples. Statues of the 12 disciples form an arch around the facade of the church with Christ at the top.
    There is also the giant Statue of Anonymus in the courtyard. He was a 12th century chronicler. He wrote the first history books on the ancient Hungarians which were mostly based on legends. It was said that by touching his pen you will receive good luck.

    Gothic style of the Castle Baroque style of the Castle Entrance to the castle Church of the 12 Disciples The Statue of Anonymus
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Arts and Culture

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  • Concerts in Budapest

    by tamasbr Updated Aug 19, 2010

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: If you visit Budapest and really want to know what is currently happening that might interest you, or close to the dates you will be arriving; here is a link to a very helpful site:
    http://eventful.com/
    Put in the city (Budapest) for example, and pick what event you are interested in:concerts,festivals,performing arts etc.
    or put in Hungary and select this week, this month or pick a date.
    Excellent site for planning your entertainement whilst in Hungary

    Related to:
    • Music
    • Festivals
    • Arts and Culture

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