Budapest Local Customs

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Most Recent Local Customs in Budapest

  • lichinga's Profile Photo

    Smoked salami

    by lichinga Written Apr 25, 2006

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    Pay a visit at the Central Market, close to Szabadsag bridge on the Pest side. The building is impressive and nice, though highly contaminated by an impressive number of tourists looking for artcrafts. If you stay on the ground floor, well you will have a cleare picture of Hungaruian food and way of life. For example, you will notice an impressive number of different kinds of smoked salami> worth trying!

    Smoked salami at the Central market

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    Shoppe Hours

    by Heniko Written Apr 16, 2006

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    Hungarian shops normally open between 10am and 6pm on weekdays and between 10am and 1pm on Saturday, although nowadays many supermarkets (especially those out of town or located in shopping malls) have extending hours. And, in residential or busy city centre areas, you'll also find 24hr grocers shops (called 'ejjel-nappal' or 'non-stop') that sell essentials such as bread, coffee, milk and tea, along with other foodstuffs, drinks and alcohol. However, as some of these can be a lure for drunks and other unsavoury elements late at night, it's wise to exercise caution.

    Another typically European trait is that smaller shops tend to close for 1-2 hours at lunchtimes. Frustratingly, some outlets even shut while the owner pops to the post office for 10 minutes. Rest assured, however, he/she will return a couple of hours later having met friends who insisted on a quick visit to the local pub or caf?. Look for a sign saying "Azonnal (or Rogton) J?v?k" on the door. Its up to you whether you wait!!

    Small shops will also put a sign up to indicate when they're going on holiday. This will normally be two weeks in July or August, so if you're looking for say, a specialist engraver, make sure that you can collect your goods before leaving Hungary.

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    Tipping

    by Heniko Written Apr 16, 2006

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    Although there are no fixed rules on tipping, it's customary to add an extra 10-15% to restaurant bills and taxi fares. Hotel porters, hairdressers and cloakroom attendants also expect to be tipped. The going rate for a gypsy violinist during an evening meal is 2000 HUF (per request).

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    Sections/Keruletek

    by Heniko Written Apr 16, 2006

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    Budapest is divided into 23 separate districts, each indicated by a Roman numeral which prefixes the street name i.e. VI. Budakeszi ut 65. Post codes comprise of four digits: 1067; the middle two representing the district - i.e. 06 is district VI. The most common type of street is an utca (often abbreviated as u.) although confusingly an ut. refers to a wide boulevard. Other thoroughfare names include: fasor (alley), rakpart (embankment).

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    The British Legation. Budapest Cont.

    by budapest8 Written Apr 3, 2006

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    Taking advantage of the fact that neither Edmund Veesenmayer,
    Hitlers proconsul in Hungary, nor the Sztojay government had formally
    challenged the right of 8000 people to emigrate to Palestine, Lutz kep
    t "negotiating" with the German and Hungarian authorities. In the process
    he changed his objective. He wanted to save as many Jewish lives as
    possible. As a ruse he and his staff started to issue tens of thousands
    of additional "protective letters", even thought these were no more
    backed by any Palestine Certificates. In order to hide the new approach,
    Lutz was careful of always using numbers 1 to 8000 and never to go beyond
    these. Each 1000 names were grouped together into one Swiss
    Collective Passport. This meant that the applicants stood under formal
    Swiss protection. As the Hungarian authorities insisted on concentrating
    all remaining Budapest Jews in one large getto, Lutz established 76 Swiss
    protected houses. The inhabitants of these houses were precariously fed and
    helped out of the Consulate meager financial and material resources.
    Meanwhile the young Jewish Chalutzim (pioneers) provided communication
    with the Jewish Community and the underground. In 1941 about 742'800
    Jews lived in Hungary. In Budapest about 150'000 survived. Between May 15
    and July 9 437 402 people died in Auschwitz. Carl Lutz helped 62'000 Jews to
    survive..."Official" Switzerland did not acknowledge his valor for a long time.
    Carl Lutz was accused to having exceeded his competence, and he even had
    problems in continuing his diplomatic career. Carl Lutz died on March 30,
    1975 at the age of 80 in Berne. Carl Lutz was one of the first to receive the
    "Righteous among the Nations" medal from Yad Vashem, his name was
    entered in the Golden Book of the Jewish National Fund. In Jaffa (Israel) and
    Berne (Switzerland) a street is named after him. Budapest honored him
    by a statue and 1999 Switzerland by issuing a postage stamp

    Legation building destroyed typical scene-crowd of Jews begging for protection Outside the Glass House in1944 comemoration Swiss stamp
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    The British Legation. Budapest

    by budapest8 Written Apr 3, 2006

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    Vice-Consul Carl Lutz arrived in Budapest in early 1942.
    As chief of the Swiss Legation's Department of Foreign
    Interests in Budapest he was in charge of the interests
    of 14 nations at war, among them the United States and
    Great Britain. His main offices were situated in the American Legation
    at Szabads?g t?r in Pest. He cared among his duties he cared for
    300 Americans, 300 English nationals, 2000 Romanians and 3000
    Yugoslavs who were stranded in Hungary. When the Germans
    occupied Hungary, March 19, 1944 persecution of the Jews grew
    very severe. Thousands seeking his protection besieged his offices
    every day. As an engaged Christian, Charles Lutz felt, he had to protect
    these people. At that time he had already helped 10'000 Jewish children
    and young people to emigrate to Palestine. He cared for refugee
    Jews who had come to Hungary from many nations and for
    Hungarian Jews who were within British and Palestine jurisdiction.
    On May 15, when deportations the Auschwitz began, Lutz decided to
    place the staff of the Jewish Council for Palestine under his diplomatic
    protection an to rename it the "Department of Emigration of the
    Swiss Legation". For this stupendous task a special relief organization
    had to be created. With the aid of volunteers Lutz increased his staff from
    15 to 150.

    The British Legation Building Budapest, in the cellar of which Carl Lutz lived for two months.

    The British Legation Building the 30 people who spent2 months in cellar 1945 Carl Ludz The destroyed British Legation.
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  • gal_flower's Profile Photo

    tiping

    by gal_flower Written Jan 25, 2006

    if there's a waiter at the place you should tip.
    anyway first take a look at the bill - if there's a service price indicated it's the tip is included
    into the bill ... anyway I tried to give the boy some extra money but he didn't took them...
    so ... if the service is not included in the bill, you should tip normally 10% to the waiter

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  • Leave a Tip, but not on the Table

    by tamasbr Updated Jan 6, 2006

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    Tipping in Hungary is quite different than the rest of the world. You do not leave the tip on the table at the restaurant; the waiter/waitress brings you the bill, you calculate what you would like to leave as a tip, add it to the bill, and then tell them to give you back the change from the two amounts; i.e. the bill is 10 dollars + 1.50 tip, you would say, please give me back from 11.50. It is the same in taxis, or anywhere else you would like to leave a tip. Tipping is generally 10 to 15%. Check carefully that the tip has not been included in the bill, as some places have introduced the practice that it is included. 10% is the general practice in Hungary, 15% will be very much appreciated, anything above this is very rare.

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  • Do not expect: Bread , Butter or Glass of Water

    by tamasbr Updated Dec 31, 2005

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    It is not a custum in Hungary to have bread and butter on the table. Nor do they offer water. They are not being impolite, so do not get upset at the restaurant you visit, or the waiter/waitress. Of course if you would like some bread and or butter, they will be happy to provide it ,but it will be charged on your final bill. If you ask for water, they will give you an uncomfortable stare, since the restaurants there make most of the profit on the drinks; but I think it could also be due to bad water in the past ; they used to put soda-water on the table, but now some restaurants have it if you ask (the soda-water) and some don't. Mineral water is not soda-water, but occassionally that is what you end up with.

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  • Important Greeting

    by tamasbr Written Dec 14, 2005

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    It is absolutely imperative in Hungary to say, goodmorning, goodafternoon, goodevening before you start any conversation at all; whether you are talking to your best friend or a salesclerk at the metro station! When I first went to Hungary and asked for directions from a Policeman, he became very very upset that I did not greet him properly; Just by saying Can you please,,...... and than thank-you at the end is not good enough!!!!!!!!!! In Hungary, always start with goodmorning, etc. Every other politeness is important, but it will mean nothing if you do not start with the goodmorning, goodafternoon etc.

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  • DPando's Profile Photo

    Karoly krt

    by DPando Written Dec 10, 2005

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    One of the most visited boulevard during our time in Budapest..it link our hostel and the city center, actually closer to the tourist info point 1 minute from deak ter on foot there is a small but nice internet coffee shop. its in a small courtyard where side by side of it you can rent bycicles

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    Eastern Europe cars

    by DPando Updated Dec 7, 2005

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    Also in budapest there is some reminisences of the former rulers way of life... you can see cars like Volga's or others wherever you go in Eastern...the bulgarian countryside is amazing in these stuffs !!

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  • DPando's Profile Photo

    shaking hands

    by DPando Updated Nov 17, 2005

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    In my first moment i didnt realize that when you meet a girl in BUDAPEST you dont have to kiss her as we do in southern europe where more is not such complicated...so just shake your hands... if you see some other day hanging out then you can kiss her on the chicks but just after meet her..

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    Cheers

    by DPando Written Nov 17, 2005

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    As other estern european countries and probably western when you are ready to cheers your glass be sure to look at your friend at the eyes ..its so common and if you dont could be a offence for them... so has a good and bad point..the good one is that help to flirt with girls looking at her specially and the bad one is that its so slow to finish the cheers!
    Not like in spain or latin countries where all is more faster and lively.
    the hungarian word is "egészégedre" and sounds like this [egashegadra] but if you want a right outer check this out

    http://dict.sztaki.hu/dict_search.php?L=ENG%3AHUN%3AEngHunDict&O=ENG&flash=&E=1&sid=6a14c17e103cc67abe83f3d84ef4e9cb&in_form=1&W=cheers&M=2&P=2&C=1&T=1

    where there is the translation from english and its outer..really useful

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  • budapest8's Profile Photo

    The Day Of The Dead ALL SAINTS DAY

    by budapest8 Updated Nov 5, 2005

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    November the first.........When the living go to visit their dead relatives en-mass.
    Group grieving but very solemn and quite with candlelit cemetries.
    symbolcally, on All Saints' Day, the "Day of the Dead". "Day of the Dead" and "father of the dead" sound almost the same in Hungarian; the difference is but a single character.
    Halloween, however, is not an Eastern European tradition. The following day, All Saints’ Day, is a different story.
    November 1st is All Saints’ Day for Catholics and many Protestants, a holy day since the early Medieval times. Eastern rite churches observe All Saints Day the first Sunday after Pentecost. Many people of Eastern Europe spend this day in prayer, thanking God and praying to saints. They often visit their departed loved ones in cemeteries.

    In predominantly Catholic countries such as Poland, Slovenia, Lithuania, Hungary and Slovakia, All Saints’ Day on November 1 is a public holiday. Practicing Catholics are required to participate in Mass. And then, both religious and non-religious people crowd into cemeteries to honor their dead relatives and also long-departed heroes of their respective nation’s history. Even in countries where All Saints’ Day is not a public holiday, such as the Czech Republic, masses of people visit cemeteries, and government officials will turn part of the day into a secular remembrance.

    Unlike the fun atmosphere of Halloween, All Saints’ Day is generally a quiet day of reflection and reverence. Krakow adds one exception, with its annual All Saints’ and All Souls’ Jazz Festival, demonstrating that there is more than one way to observe the past.

    No Halloween or Guy Fawkes night...just a cemetry Dusk for the dead. Drac is Back (Bela was a Hungarian) What skullduggery is this? Pic of a pic in shop wi Happening tonight the 5th of November...
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Budapest Local Customs

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