Buda Castle - Budavar, Budapest

276 Reviews

District I

Been here? Rate It!

hide
  • Danube river from Danube Terrace
    Danube river from Danube Terrace
    by balhannah
  • Prince Eugene
    Prince Eugene
    by balhannah
  • View from Danube Terrace
    View from Danube Terrace
    by balhannah
  • rosequartzlover1's Profile Photo

    Buda Castle(2)

    by rosequartzlover1 Written Jan 13, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Destruction in 1945
    1 more image

    Part 2…The palace existed for around three decades,on 30 December 1916, the building played a part in the coronation ceremony of the last Hungarian king, Charles IV of Hungary. After the 1918 revolution and the removal of the Habsburg dynasty, the Royal Palace became the seat of the new regent of the Kingdom of Hungary, Miklós Horthy. Horthy lived in the Krisztinaváros wing with his family between the years of 1920 and 1944. In this era the palace was the centre of Hungarian political and social life. On 16 October 1944 a Nazi German commando unit, led by Otto Skorzeny, occupied the Royal Palace and forced the regent to abdicate. Buda Castle was the last major stronghold of Budapest held by Axis forces (Germans and Hungarians) during the siege of Budapest between December 1944 and February 1945. The defenders of the castle attempted to break the Soviet blockade on 11 February 1945, but failed, leaving 90% of the soldiers dead on the streets of Buda. Heavy fights and artillery fire rendered the palace into ruins. All the furniture vanished, roofs and vaults collapsed, and the southern and western wings were burned out. The destruction was comparable to that of the great siege of 1686. Immediately after the war, archeological research was begun in order to unearth the remains of the medieval castle. The first reconstruction plan of the medieval remains was written by László Gerõ in 1950 and finalized in 1952. The reconstruction work was finished in 1966.
    The new communist government of Hungary considered the Royal Palace a symbol of the former regime. Therefore, Hungarian leaders chose to thoroughly modernize the interior, and exterior of the palace again,as modernist architects had condemned the Hauszmann style as "too ornate".In 1952 the Hungarian government asked for help from Poland, because they had successfully rebuilt Warsaw, and other cities. The modernist dome was designed by Lajos Hidasi in 1961 after Italian Baroque models. The palace was rebuilt by 1966, but the interior spaces were ready only in the 1980s.
    Now Buda Castle became a cultural centre, home to three museums and the National Széchényi Library.

    Was this review helpful?

  • rosequartzlover1's Profile Photo

    Buda Castle(1)

    by rosequartzlover1 Written Jan 13, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    It’s a long history about Buda castle.I tried to abridge the story but still a lot to share.I’ll devide it into 3 parts.First part are the old time stories...The first royal residence on the Castle Hill was built during the middle age by King Béla IV of Hungary between 1247 and 1265. It is uncertain whether it was situated on the southern tip of the hill or on the northern elevation. The oldest part of the present-day palace was built in the 14th century by Stephen, Duke of Slavonia, who was the younger brother of King Louis I of Hungary. Only the foundations remain of the castle keep, which was known as Stephen's Tower. After the Battle of Mohács, the medieval Kingdom of Hungary collapsed. The Ottoman Turks occupied the town in 1526. Although Buda was sacked and burned, the Royal Palace was not damaged.The Ottoman let the palace decayed. It was partially used as barracks, a storage place, and stables, and otherwise it stood empty.. In the era between 1541 and 1686, the Habsburgs tried to re-capture Buda several times,caused serious damage. Many buildings of the former Royal Palace were roofless and their vaults collapsed. Nonetheless the medieval palace mostly survived until the great siege of 1686. The medieval palace was destroyed in the great siege of 1686 when Buda was captured by allied Christian forces. In a heavy artillery bombardment, many buildings burned and collapsed. The Stephen's Tower, used as a gunpowder store by the Ottomans, exploded when hit by a single cannon.Although the walls mainly survived, the burned-out shell rapidly decayed from a lack of maintenance. Between 1702 and 1715, Stephen's Tower disappeared completely.
    In 1715 a small Baroque palace was built according to the plans of Johann Hölbling but in 1723 the palace was accidentally burned down.
    The Era of Maria Theresa…The relations between the Hungarian nobility and the Habsburgs were exceptionally good. The queen was grateful for this, the new Royal Palace became the symbol of peace and friendship between the dynasty and the nation. The plans of the splendid, U-shaped Baroque palace with a cour d'honneur were drawn by Jean Nicolas Jadot, chief architect of the Viennese court. In 1764 the Queen visited the palace, and allotted 20,000 thalers a year for the work, which recommenced in 1765 according to the plans of Franz Anton Hillebrandt. Hillebrand altered the cour d'honneur façade of the central wing in Rococo style . In 1769 the St. Sigismund Chapel was consecrated and the palace was finished the same year.
    After that in 1769 the place being used as nunnery ,then 1777 being a university and in 1791 the palace became the residence of the new Habsburg palatine of the Kingdom of Hungary. In 1810 the palace was damaged by fire again. The palace was rebuilt between 1850 and 1856 by Josef Weiss and Carl Neuwirth. The 13-axis central wing was raised with a third storey and a squat attic-tower. The central risalit was decorated with a balcony of six colossal columns. With these changes, the former Viennese Baroque palace of Maria Theresa became considered a more austere Neoclassical Baroque building. Emperor Franz Joseph I of Austria visited Buda Castle in 1856 and 1857. After the Austro-Hungarian Compromise of 1867, Franz Joseph was crowned king of Hungary. The palace played an important part in the lavish ceremony, and was a symbol of peace between the dynasty and the nation. In the last decades of the 19th century Budapest experienced rapid economic development. Hungarian government intended to create a royal palace to match any famous European royal residence (especially their old rival, Vienna's Hofburg). The rebuilding spanned forty years, between 1875 and 1912, and caused sweeping changes in topography of the entire

    Was this review helpful?

  • antistar's Profile Photo

    The Castle District

    by antistar Updated Oct 24, 2013

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Matthias Church
    3 more images

    Sitting on one of the Buda Hills, the Castle District offers a commanding view of the city of Budapest. The whole district is a protected UNESCO World Heritage site, and also the medieval centre of the city. It gives a concentrated "old world" feel, and includes some of Budapest's best sights and museums. It's large, and takes a good afternoon of walking to enjoy it, but the pace is relaxed and it's easy to enjoy the experience. I was just going for the morning, and ended up spending the entire day there.

    Key sights include Matthias Church and Fisherman's Bastion, from which are some of the best views in Budapest. Further down is the famous funicular, an expensive but welcome trip up the steep slopes to the top. Next to that is the castle itself, an enormous palace complex, the size of which is impossible to comprehend until you see it in full from across the river. The palace contains a couple of excellent museums, including the vast Budapest City Museum.

    Was this review helpful?

  • grayfo's Profile Photo

    Budavári Palota - Buda Castle

    by grayfo Written Oct 15, 2013

    2 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Buda castle, also referred to as the Royal Palace or Royal Castle was first built in 1265 and has since gone through various regenerations; the castle was the historical home to the kings of Hungary and even today is rather austere compared to its predecessors, but it is still an imposing complex with its 300 metre long facade overlooking the Danube. The castle consists of a six wings arranged around the Lion Courtyard and is also home to the National Library, National Gallery and the Budapest History Museum.

    Tuesday to Sunday: 10:00 am to 6:00 pm

    Admission: 1,500 Forints

    July 2012

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces

    Was this review helpful?

  • shavy's Profile Photo

    Buda Castle

    by shavy Written Aug 31, 2013
    Buda Castle
    4 more images

    Breathtaking panorama world Heritage Site the medieval town of Buda grew around the castle the town's real development started when the Royal Court moved here in the 15th century
    It's a massive place to walk around be sure to wear comfy shoes, the castle district is beautiful when illuminated at night

    Wander the old cobbled streets of the castle surrounding the Trinity Square (Szentharomsag ter)
    Head to the imposing and multi-faceted Royal Palace. Make sure to admire it from all sides
    You will have an amazing view of the mighty Danube from the eastern façade

    Was this review helpful?

  • jumpingnorman's Profile Photo

    Excellent views of Danube from Buda Castle!

    by jumpingnorman Updated Mar 27, 2013

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Wearing Poland Shirt while on Budapest Castle Hill

    I rode the 95-meter funicular from near Chain Bridge and ended up at the magnificentBuda Castle (Hungarian: Budai Vár, Turkish: Budin Kalesi) which is part of the Budapest World heritage Site of 1987. You have to go here when in Budapest because the views are just spectacular!

    A true Royal Palace, Buda Castle was built on the southern tip of Castle Hill, next to the Baroque and 19th century houses and public buildings of the old Castle District (Hun: Várnegyed). It is also linked to Adam Clark Square.

    The Castle Hill where Budapest was founded is awesome - rising 48 meters above the Danube and giving those perfect KODAK views of the Danube. It has been conquered and re-conquered several times and it’s amazing that the whole complex still stands after all these years. The renovations of the 1950’s helped a lot to bring the place back to its previous glory.

    Today, The Castle has 203 rooms and houses several museums, among them the Budapest Historical Museum and the National Gallery.

    UPDATE UPDATE UPDATE!

    I made a video of my trip to Budapest!
    Hope you like this video:

    MT FIRST DAY IN BUDAPEST

    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces

    Was this review helpful?

  • mindcrime's Profile Photo

    Buda castle and palace guards

    by mindcrime Written Dec 16, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Buda castle
    4 more images

    I have to admit that I loved seeing Buda castle from a distance, especially during the night it looks amazing (pic 1). Overlooking the city from Castle Hill and it’s worth to be visited anyway as it is housing the National Hungarian Gallery that takes the middle section of the castle but also the Budapest Historical Museum.

    Its construction started in 13th century by king Bela but it was just a small keep surrounded by thick walls at that time. The palace was actually built by king Lajos the Great and expanded many times during 14th century and then again by king Matthias. That old palace was demolished by Ottoman Turks during Budapest occupation (1541-1686) so after that a new palace was built in early 18th century in baroque style by king of Habsburg Charles III which was expanded by empress Maria Theresa.

    Then the great fire of 1810 almost destroyed the palace again so new wings added after the Austro-Hungarian compromise in 1867. Of course WWII affect the palace for one more time…
    There are many sculptures and monuments around that worth to be see while a bit further at Disz Ter (parade square) we watched the military guards change, a small ceremony that doesn’t really matter if you miss it. Definitely the building around are much more interesting, many of them in baroque style. Nearby there’s a small garden square and a monument (Honved Memorial) with a statue made by Gyorgy Zala in late 1893 dedicated to War of Independence (1848-49).

    Was this review helpful?

  • Jefie's Profile Photo

    Like a phoenix born out of its ashes

    by Jefie Updated Nov 11, 2012

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Buda Castle at night
    3 more images

    Buda castle dates back to 1265. It is located on top of Castle Hill, in Buda. Up until the 19th century, it was the official residence of Hungarian kings. Through its long history, it was destroyed and rebuilt several times, finally achieving its final form after World War II. First built as a Gothic palace, it took on a Renaissance style in the 15th century under King Matyas, then it became a Baroque palace in the 17th century, and it was decorated in a Rococo style under Maria Teresa, Queen of Hungary. The palace was almost completely destroyed during World War II, and its reconstruction was completed in 1966, during the course of which extensive archeological work was conducted to unearth the castle's history. The view of Central Pest from the castle's terrace is fantastic! The oldest remaining part of the royal palace now houses the Budapest History Museum, while most of the former royal appartments of Maria Teresa are now home to the Hungarian National Gallery. Another section of the castle houses the Sechenyi National Library, a research library that houses an important collection of historical documents (not open to visitors).

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • hungariangirl896's Profile Photo

    Explore Buda Castle

    by hungariangirl896 Written Aug 22, 2012

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Buda Castle
    4 more images

    A UNESCO site, the Buda Castle dominates the Buda side of the city. Construction of this castle began in the 14th century and was expanded upon during medieval times. It even withstood the Ottoman invasions with minimal damage. In 1686 the castle was destroyed, then the Habsburgs attempted to rebuild it, but later it was destroyed once more. One more attempt was made and the castle was finally rebuilt in 1769. It's interesting to note that at that time, it cost approximately $1,816.08 to rebuild Buda Castle. Some members of the Habsburg family lived here until the Hungarians took over Buda and the castle was greatly damaged again. In the 1850s it was rebuilt for the third time and Franz Joseph I was crowned here. After being damaged more times (mainly from the second world war), it was rebuilt again in 1966. Buda Castle contains a plethora of different rooms for example the King's Cellar, the Palatinal Crypt, and the Baroque Court. Outside of the castle you can find beautiful monuments like the Turul and Matthias Fountain. At Buda Castle, you can also explore the Budapest History Museum, the Szechenyi Library, and the Hungarian National Gallery. The area around the castle is very beautiful (especially in the summer). Excellent views of the city can be seen here as well. I definitely recommend a visit here so you can see a large piece of the nation's history.

    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • TrendsetterME's Profile Photo

    Buda Castle, Budapest, Hungary ...

    by TrendsetterME Written Mar 2, 2012

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Buda Castle, Budapest, Hungary
    4 more images

    Buda Castle (Hungarian: Budavári Palota, German: Burgpalast, Turkish: Budin Kalesi) is the historical castle and palace complex of the Hungarian kings in Budapest, first completed in 1265.

    In the past, it was also called Royal Palace (Hungarian: Királyi-palota) and Royal Castle (Hungarian: Királyi Vár, German: Königliche Burg).

    Buda Castle was built on the southern tip of Castle Hill, bounded on the north by what is known as the Castle District (Várnegyed), famous for its Medieval, Baroque and 19th century houses, churches and public buildings. It is linked to Clark Ádám Square and the Széchenyi Chain Bridge by the Castle Hill Funicular.

    The castle is part of the Budapest World Heritage Site, declared in 1987.

    U need several hours to enjoy the whole area and to shoot photos, a must see spot of Budapest ... :)

    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • katalin's Profile Photo

    Buda Castle

    by katalin Updated Jan 28, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    1 more image

    The Buda Castle in Budapest I. one part of town known as the Castle district. Since 1987, the UNESCO World Heritage List under the name Castle Hill is included. With a number of medieval monuments, and 17-18. century houses and public buildings is located. The Buda Castle district has three main elements of the Royal Palace, St. George's Square and the historic district.

    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Museum Visits
    • Castles and Palaces

    Was this review helpful?

  • zadunajska8's Profile Photo

    Buda Palace - Budavári Palota

    by zadunajska8 Written Nov 27, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Dome of Budav��ri Palota
    4 more images

    Buda Palace is a complex of buildings on the castle hill and the feature which dominates any view from the banks of the Danube with it's famous green dome.

    It's home to the Hungarian National Gallery and Budapest History Museum as well as being quite pleasant to walk around in it's own right.

    We entered via the Habsburg steps which follow an ornamental gateway (dating from 1903) from near the Sikló funicular and lead down into the gardens of the palace where there are several fountains and statues including that of Prince Eugene of Savoy astride his horse. The statue commemorates the 1697 battle of Zenta which was seen as important in the war with the Turks. At this point you will be near the entrance to the Hungarian National Gallery which is well worth seeing. Nearby there is a small passage which leads throughto a courtyyard where you will find the Mátyás Fountain which depicts the Hungarian king Mátyás Corvinus and was designed by Alajos Stróbl in 1904.

    A much larger archway here is the Lion Gate, so named because it is guarded on each side by two stone lions, and this leads through to a completely encircled courtyard known as the Lions courtyard where you will find the Budapest History Museum

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • zadunajska8's Profile Photo

    Budapest History Museum at Buda Palace

    by zadunajska8 Written Nov 27, 2011

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Budapest History Museum at Buda Palace
    1 more image

    The Budapest History Museum is located deep inside Buda Palace with it's entrance off the Lions Courtyard. It's free entry if you have a Budapest card and one of those places with a compulsory cloakroom where you must leave your bags. If you want to take pictures then you must buy an additional photography ticket.

    I'm afraid I was a little disappointed with this museum. The captioning seems to be almost not existant in English (and scarce in Hungarian actually!). The exhibition of gothic statues (which I have since found out were discovered by chance on the site during excavations of the medieval palace in 1974) is almost completely without anything to explain what the exhibits are at all in any language. The basement level which includes the excavations of parts of the medieval royal palace is slightly more engaging, but not much.

    It seems such a shame that in a location where they are gifted with so many tourists of all nationalities who are ready to visit such places that they haven't made more of an effort to update the museum and make it more engaging.

    The museum cafe is however good value and has some excellent cakes on sale.

    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Archeology
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • zadunajska8's Profile Photo

    Hungarian National Gallery -Magyar Nemzeti Galéria

    by zadunajska8 Written Nov 27, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Magyar Nemzeti Gal��ria
    1 more image

    The Hungarian National Gallery is housed within one of the buildings of Buda Palace on Castle Hill. If you have a Budapest Card then your entry is free here. As we found with pretty much all museums and galleries in Budapest it is compulsory to leave you bag at the cloakroom (but this is free). You have to buy an extra ticket to take photographs inside.

    The building is quite impressive in it's own right but I think this will be best seen once you reach the 3rd floor landing and can appreciate the roof and look down accross all the other floors.

    The 1st floor is occupied by pre- 20th century works and as is usually the case almost all of them are on a religious or semi-religious theme. If this is what you enjoy then they do have a good collection so enjoy. Personally it's not really my thing although the exhibition of alterpieces they have rescued from around Hungary (and it's former conquests) is quite pleasant on the eye.

    On the 2nd floor they have early 20th century works which are in my opinion a little more interesting.

    For me the highlight was however (and this will be very controversial) the 3rd floor with it's exhibition of art since the second world war - a great deal of it very abstract and very very modern. Being a philistine I don't claim to understand any of it but I did find it to be a collection which I enjoyed looking at. It was interesting (if bizarre in places) and colourful. The sculptures on the 3rd floor landing are fantastic.

    The toliets are not in great condition but are servicable if absolutely needed.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    Buda - Entry at the Buda complex

    by croisbeauty Updated Nov 14, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Jesuits Stairs

    This is the bus stop in front of the entry at the Fishermans bastion and the Matthias church.
    Of course, you can reach it also by foot. When passing The Chain Bridge you'll arrive at Clark Adam ter, turn on the right into Hunyadi Janos street and that's it.
    On this picture you can see the Jesuits Stars which lead up through the Fishermen's Bastion to the Matthias Church. The edges of the stairs and walkways are decorated by neo-Romanesque ornamentation.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Budapest

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

106 travelers online now

Comments

View all Budapest hotels