Chain Bridge -Szecheny Lanchid, Budapest

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  • german_eagle's Profile Photo

    Szechenyi lanchid (Chain bridge)

    by german_eagle Written Apr 4, 2010

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    Chain bridge from the castle
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    Budapest's oldest and probably most famous bridge was designed by Englishman William T. Clark and built 1839 - 49 by Adam Clark (not related). The lion sculptures were added in 1850. After blown up by the Nazis in WWII it was quickly rebuilt and reopened in 1849 - on its 100th anniversary.

    The suspension bridge with two massive pillars is 380 m long and was a technical masterpiece at its time. It holds two lanes for cars plus one sidewalk on each side. Usually the traffic is heavy and I wouldn't recommend to walk across the bridge due to the exhaust and noise.

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    THE CHAIN BRIDGE

    by ruki Updated Jun 9, 2005

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    The most beautiful bridge in Budapest. Construction of the bridge was begun in 1839. It was the first permanent bridge connecting the two cities Buda and Pest. The stone lions at both ends of the bridge are local favorites. It was amazing watching this bridge in the evening.

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    Chain Bridge

    by GentleSpirit Updated Dec 3, 2012

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    Szechenyi  Bridge, with Buda Castle in background
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    the amazing Szechenyi Chain Bridge,,,,,,Buda Castle in the background

    The bridge is named after Count István Széchenyi, its main supporter and was opened in 1849. It connects Roosevelt ter on the Pest side to Adam Clark ter on the Buda side of the Danube River.
    It was built in pieces and transported from Britain. It has subsequently been rebuilt several times, especially after World War II, when it sustained substantial damage.

    You can walk across the bridge but also its beautiful to see around sunset with the spires on the other side of the river in the background. And at night its all lit up,, just magnificent! Definitely a MUST see in Budapest

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    The story of the Széchenyi Chain Bridge

    by csordila Updated Mar 19, 2009

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    A painting on laying  of the foundation stone 1842
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    The first idea of a bridge between Buda and Pest has an origin from King Sigismund of Luxemburg already in 1436. Also King Matthias Corvinus was pondering over the construction of a constant marble bridge, onto the sample of the Trojan bridge.
    However, from the birth of the idea more than four-centuries were necessary, to open the first stone-bridge connecting Pest and Buda in 1849.
    Count Széchenyi invited the English engineer Tierney Clark to design the bridge and the Scott Adam Clark was responsible for the construction.

    The prototype was the nearly identical but smaller suspension bridge across the River Thames in Marlow on Thames/Buckinghamshire. A plaque commemorates the link with Marlow Suspension Bridge.
    The new Chain Bridge, the first permanent bridge across the Danube below Vienna since Roman times was unveiled on 20 November 1849. Before this time in winter when the ice drift begann, it was possible to cross from Pest onto Buda via Vienna only. In 1898 was named after Count István Széchenyi.
    By the way, on the reverse side of the new 200 forint medals the Chain Bridge is visible.

    After completing the bridge, the Scott engineer Adam Clark went back to England, in order to visit his old parents; however, due to the ten years spent in Hungary, he became as much Hungarian, that he accepted no engineering jobs offered in London, but he returned into his new home land, in Hungary. The square, which can be found on the Buda side of the bridge has been named after him.

    Several anecdota are connected with the bridge; the best-known is, that the lions decorating the bridgeheads do not have tongue; the lions have tongue of course, but from the street-level can not be seen.

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    Chain Bridge

    by MedioLatino Written Sep 13, 2004

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    Chain Bridge, Gresham Palace, St Stephans Basilica
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    This is really a must see thing to be included in all the trips! I would recommend you to start on the Buda side (eg. after a nice Castle tour descending with the funicular to Clark Ádám square).

    Walk across the Chain Bridge on the right hand side, so that you will be able to look back to the Castle. The best time to do the walk is after down, when the lights are already turned up.

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  • belgianchocolate's Profile Photo

    The chain bridge...

    by belgianchocolate Updated Oct 12, 2004

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    After that we went for icecream and started
    walking towards the water. So , after
    the opera the chain bridge was the second
    large monument we saw in Budapest.

    1832 , earl Széchenyi started with the preparation
    to build this bridge. the ' Széchenyi Lanchid'
    is the oldest connection between the Pest and
    the Boeda side. The two famous builders of the
    famous bridge over the thames in London
    Tierney William Clark and Adam Clark got
    the assignment.

    In 1849 the 375 meters long bridge was finished.
    I have read somwhere that it weights
    2000 ton. Amazing.

    Now the bridge is a symbol for freedom and
    most beautiful lighted overnight.

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    Szechenyi Chain Bridge

    by MalenaN Written Mar 16, 2006

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    The Chain Bridge
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    Szechenyi Chain Bridge was the first permanent bridge built between Buda and Pest. The bridge opened up in 1849 and was by then one of the largest suspension bridges with its 380 metres. As all other bridges in Budapest it was destroyed by the Nazis during the end of the second World War, but rebuilt a few years later.
    The bridge has got its name from Count Istvan Szechenyi who was a great reformer in the 19th century.

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    Bridge to Pest(THE CHAIN BRIDGE)

    by mallyak Written Dec 15, 2010

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    First opened to traffic in mid 19th century, the Chain Bridge was slung from huge chains giving it a very wide span. This was because the frozen sheets of ice that flow down the river in winter would have crashed in to supporting pillars so this new technique of slinging the river from chains was devised. When The Chain Bridge was first opened in Budapest, the nearest steady bridge across the Danube was in Vienna

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    Chain Bridge ( Szechenyi Lanchid ) ( 4 photos )

    by nicolaitan Updated Nov 20, 2006

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    Chain Bridge from the funicular
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    Walking the Chain Bridge across the legendary Danube is a highlight of visiting Budapest. The first permanent bridge across the river below Vienna since Roman times, it was constructed between 1842-9. Count Szechenyi hired British engineer William Clark to design the bridge, which was based on a smaller version in the UK. The construction was supervised by Adam Clark, who then built a tunnel under the Castle Hill to connect the Buda area directly to the bridge. The center span of 202 yards was the longest suspension bridge span in existence at that time. Joining Buda and Pest enabled the rapid economic growth of both. The only major reconstruction required was following WWII when the Nazis blew up the center span as they retreated near the war's end.

    The name Chain Bridge derives from the use of chains rather than cables to cross the river, like a bicycle chain. The roadway is suspended from the chain.

    At the Pest end, ter Roosevelt is backed by the Gresham Four Seasons Hotel and as seen from the Castle district, St. Stephen's church looms in the background. On the Buda side, a square named after Adam Clark houses the famed funicular to the Castle Hill as well as the tunnel under the hill.

    Count Istvan Szechenyi (1791-1860) is an interesting historic figure. He visited Britain several times and not only imported the engineer and builder of the bridge, but also brought to Budapest such advances as horse racing, steamboats, and flush toilets. Tourists have much to thank him for.

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    Chain Bridge

    by cjg1 Updated Dec 22, 2008

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    Liz and I with the Bridge in the background
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    The chain bridge is a suspension bridge. It crosses over the Danube river and connects Buda and Pest. The bridge was opened in 1849 but was damaged during WWII and was rebuilt.

    I found the bridge interesting especially the Lions guarding the entrances to the bridge. It looked beautiful in the daytime but even more spectacular lit up at night.

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  • Jefie's Profile Photo

    The most beautiful bridge in Budapest

    by Jefie Updated Nov 11, 2012

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    One of the lions guarding the bridge
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    I think most people who've been to Budpest will agree with me that Széchenyi lánchíd, or the Chain bridge as it is called in English, is the most beautiful bridge crossing the Danube River. This 375 m long suspension bridge made of wrought iron and stone pillars was completed in 1849 and at that time it was considered an engineering triumph: thanks ot its202 m long middle section, it had one of the longest spans in the world at the time. It was the first permanent bridge to be built over the Danube in Budapest. The bridge was designed by an English engineer, William Tierney Clark - it is a larger version of a bridge he had previously designed to be built across the Thames River in Marlow, UK. In return, the four lions that stand at the end of the bridge (two at each end, one on each side) were the work of local artist Marschalko János and are believed to have influenced the design of the four lions at the base of Nelson's Column in London's Trafalgar Square. As with all other bridges in Budapest, it was badly damaged during World War II but luckily they were able to salvage most of it and restore the original design. Today it's one of the city's most popular attractions.

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    Chain Bridge

    by miman Updated Mar 21, 2007

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    Chain Bridge
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    The Chain Bridge is one of Budapest's most famous landmarks. The magnificent suspension bridge the river Danube between Pest and Buda, at the time still separate cities. The first connection between Pest and Buda was made by the Chain Bridge or Széchenyi lánchíd, Chain Bridgenamed after count Széchenyi, who took the initiative to build the bridge. In 1836 he gave the project to William Tierney Clark and Adam Clark. The 375 meter (1230ft) long and 16 meter wide bridge, a superb engineering feat, was opened on november 20, 1849. In 1857 Adam Clark dug a 350 meter Chain Bridge at nightlong tunnel through the Castle Hill to connect the bridge with the Buda hinterland.

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    CHAIN BRIDGE

    by mtncorg Updated May 21, 2005

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    Chain Bridge uniting Buda and Pest

    This is the first bridge across the Danube linking Pest and Buda. It was built in 1842-1849 under the direction of the English engineer Adam Clark. It was almost blown up immediately after during the 1849 War for Independence between Hungarian rebels and Austrian troops. The explosives failed to go off and the bridge was spared until 1945 when the Germans were a bit moree efficient in dropping the center span in front of the Russians. The Chain Bridge has become one of the City's enduring symbols.

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  • littlesam1's Profile Photo

    Szechenyi lanchid (Chain Bridge)

    by littlesam1 Updated Mar 16, 2007

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    Chain Bridge viewed from Gellert Hill
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    Budapest is a city of many bridges connecting the two cities of Buda and Pest. The first connection to be built was the Chain Bridge (Sczecheyl Ianchid). The bridge was completed and opened on December 20, 1849. Historically in 1989 the bridge was used by the people of Budapest for their demonstration for freedom and independence. The bridge itself is very beautiful, especially in the evening when it is covered with lights. Walking across the bridge I was able to get many beautiful photo's the Danube and the banks of Budapest.

    During World War II Hungary suffered many bombings and much was destroyed in the city. At one point all of the bridges in Budapest were blown up. The Chain Bridge was restored and opend for traffic again in 1949.

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    My Favorite Bridge in Budapest

    by dcwizard Written Mar 16, 2004

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    Freedom Bridge: Free of Traffic

    The Chain Bridge must be the most famous bridge crossing the Danube in Budapest, but my favorite bridge has to be the beautiful green Freedom or Liberty Bridge (Szabadsag Hid) which links the Gellert Hill in Buda with Pest, near the University of Economics. Built in 1896 for the Millenium celebrations, the Hungarian mythical birds stand perched on the golden orbs at the top of the pillars, as if ready to take flight.

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