Gellert Hill - Gellert Hegy - Citadella, Budapest

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1118 Budapest, Gellerthegy, Citadella

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  • Gellert Monument
    Gellert Monument
    by balhannah
  • view from the hill.
    view from the hill.
    by rosequartzlover1
  • That's Szabadsag bridge and Gellert bath.
    That's Szabadsag bridge and Gellert...
    by rosequartzlover1
  • illumina's Profile Photo

    Gellert Hill

    by illumina Written Jan 16, 2010

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    Gellert Hill from the bottom
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    Gellert Hill lies on the Buda side of the Danube, to the south of Obuda, between Erszebet hid and Szabadsag hid ('hid' meaning bridge). The hill was named after Szent Gellert (St. Gerard), who was a bishop who played an important part in converting Hungary to Christianity. He was thrown to his death from this hill.

    At the top of the hill is the Citadella, where some wonderful views over the city and the Danube are available.

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    Central Buda: Gellert Hill Citadella

    by antistar Written Aug 12, 2009

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    Gellert Hill Citadella, Budapest
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    You absolutely must visit the Citadella. I made the mistake of missing this on my first visit. Then I spent almost two years living in Budapest without visiting. When I finally did I couldn't believe what I had been missing. The Citadella offers some of the best views I have ever seen anywhere in the world. Prague might be prettier, Paris more elegant, and London more impressive, but nothing I have seen there matches the views of Budapest from the Citadella.

    The views must have been spectacular here before there was even a city. The Danube snaking down the valley, and the green forested hills rolling along the horizon. But when you add in the enormity of the Castle District, the blanket of multicoloured roofs soaking up the summer sunshine, and the network of bridges criss-crossing the glistening Danube, you have something that you'll not see anywhere else on the planet. You'll understand very quickly why this is such a popular place to visit, and such an exclusive and expensive part of Budapest.

    The Citadella itself was built as a fortification by the Austrians back in the 19th century. Later the communists added the victory statue to the front, leaning out over the Danube. That statue is now the Citadella's most prominent structure, so it's not surprising that as soon as the Iron Curtain fell, the Hungarians changed the monument from one celebrating the Soviet "liberation" to one celebrating all those who gave their lives for liberty.

    You can walk around the Citadella for free, or you can go inside to see the museum and get even better views from its walls. The price is steep, though, at 1200 forints per person.

    Note: Unfortunately my pictures, due to the sheer scale of the views, don't do them justice. I also suspect that getting up onto the Citadella walls would give much better pictures, due to less trees.

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    Gellert Hill

    by BruceDunning Updated Jun 15, 2009

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    Monument to Russian military losses here
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    This is a good place to walk off your tensions. It has a number of winding trails that take you to the top for the statues commemorating the loss of Russian soldiers in taking back the city from Germany in WWII. There is a fort on top of the hill called Citadella. It was occupied to watch the territory for years. It is almost 700 feet high and the walk can be fatiguing. The Liberty statues on top is seen for miles, as intended; that is what the Russians intended.

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    Gellert Hill

    by Tom_Fields Written Apr 28, 2009

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    Statue of St Gellert
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    This hill offers the best view of Budapest. It's a moderately steep, fairly difficult hike up to the top (no problem for a fit walker). From there, one can see forever--see the main photo for my Budapest page.

    Near the top is a statue of St Gellert, Budapest's patron saint. A waterfall graces the hillside.

    At the summit stands the Monument to the Liberation. Also, be sure to visit the Citadella, where the Hapsburg rulers built a fortress with a commanding view of the city. It also served as a prison, gaining the nickname "Budapest Bastille". During the Cold War, an anti-aircraft artillery battery stood here.

    On the way, be sure to check out the Cave Church. Consecrated in 1926, it was run by monks of the Pauline Order (the only holy order of Hungarian origin) until the 1950s. After the 1956 revolt, the Communists executed their leader and walled up the place. But it was reopened in 1989.

    Nearby is the Hotel Gellert, famed for its thermal baths. I didn't visit this place, but the gorgeous Art Nouveau building is visible from across the Danube.

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    Climbing the Hill

    by gigina Written Feb 22, 2009

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    You can climb the Gellert Hill starting at the Elisabeth Bridge near the Gellert Monument, or you can take the route starting at the Gellert Hotel. If you prefer, you can travel up the hill by automobile or hop one of the city’s public buses (#27 starting at Móricz Zsigmond körtér).

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    Gellert Monument

    by gigina Written Feb 22, 2009

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    At the other side of the hill, near the Elisabeth Bridge is a statue of Bishop Gellert, the martyr after whom the hill was named. The monument was built in 1904 at the site where Gellert was presumably killed in the 11th century.

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    Liberation Monument

    by gigina Written Feb 22, 2009

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    Erected atop the hill in 1947, the Liberation Monument pays homage to the Soviet soldiers that freed the city from the Nazis during World War II. A palm-bearing statue of a female stands about 40 meters (130 feet) in the air. Visitors will also find a statue of a Soviet soldier here as well as the names of the Soviets that died in battle at Budapest.

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    Gellért Hill

    by gigina Written Feb 22, 2009

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    Named for a Christian martyr, Gellert Hill rises majestically above the Danube River, offering visitors a panoramic view of the city of Budapest.

    About Gellert Hill
    Gellert Hill, rising about 430 feet (140 meters) above sea level, is named for Bishop Gellert (Gerald), known for his mission to spread Christianity throughout Hungary. After the death of Saint Stephen, the first Christian king of Hungary, legend has it that the rebelling insurgent pagan Magyars sealed Gellert up in a barrel and hurled him down the side of the hill.

    The Citadel
    Atop Gellert Hill sits the Citadel, a structure built by the Austrian Habsburgs between 1850 and 1854 in order to better control the city after the suppression of the Hungarian War of Independence. This fortress, which sits at the top of the hill, was originally about 200m (220 yards) long with walls about 6m/20 ft high and up to 3m/10 ft thick.

    When the Habsburgs left Budapest in 1897, ownership of the fortress reverted to the city. They tore down part of the walls as a symbol of victory against the Austrians. However, the Citadel was to be used again to house Hungarian soldiers.

    The Citadel also played a role in World War II. Historians point out that it was from the Citadel that Germans held the city at bay.

    Today, the old barracks have been converted to a tourist hotel and the structure mostly serves as a place from which guests can enjoy views of the city and the pretty Danube River below.

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  • Robmj's Profile Photo

    Gellert Hill

    by Robmj Written Jan 4, 2009

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    The view from the top

    Also known as the Citadel hill, this 235 metre hill provides a great view over Budapest and the hill is set in a park location with numerous wee walking tracks.

    The hill is named after a monk St Gellert who was from the reign of King Stephen I. On this hill, along is geographic fault, medicinal springs emerge which supply the Gellert, Rudas and Rac baths.

    On the top of the hill is a museum and numerous vendors ply their local crafts trade which makes for an interesting stop.

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    St. Gellert Statue

    by cjg1 Updated Dec 31, 2008

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    St. Gellert was a bishop that was killed by the pagans during the great pagan rebellion in 1046. He was put in a barrel and rolled down into the deep from the top of the hill. His statue no looks out from the hill from where he lost his life.

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    Citadella

    by Airpunk Written Sep 12, 2008

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    The Citadella
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    Although a popular tourist destination, the citadella is not really a popular building with the hungarians. Built by the Habsburg Monarchy during the war of independence, it became a symbol for supression. When it was finished the war was already over and the Citadella never took part in any fight. In 1the 1890s, when it was handed over to the city, parts of it were blown up during the ceremony. Later, during WWII, it was used by the occupying nazis.
    Today, the area around the Citadella is perhaps the most touristy one in Budapest. There are souvenir shops all the way down to the car park, selling the usual stuff you would expect everywhere in the world. The Citadella itself is a war museum, parts of it are also used a a disco.

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    Independence Monument

    by Airpunk Written Sep 11, 2008

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    Independence Monument
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    On top of the hill you will find the Independence Monument. This one was erected here in 1947 to commemorate the soviet soldiers who died in the liberation of Hungary during WWII. After Hungary left Soviet Influence in the early 1990s, the monument was redicated and the names of the Soviet Soldiers removed in 1992. Statues depiciting Soviet soldiers were moved into the statue park, where Lenin statues and similar soviet icons also found a new home. From the monument, you’ll have an excellent view on Budapest.

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  • Airpunk's Profile Photo

    Gellert Hill

    by Airpunk Written Sep 11, 2008

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    Gellert Monument
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    Gellert Hill is located south of Castle Hill and has a couple of monuments worth a visit. First beginning with the Gellert Monument, located halfway on the stairs up to the hill. The monument was revealed in 1904. St. Gellert was a bishop who played a large role in christianising Hungary. He was killed in 1046 when he was thrown down from the hill in a spike barrel into the Danube. Together with St. Stephen, he is seen as one of the patron saints of Hungary. The most interesting monument ins the Independence monument which is visible from almost every part of the City. Further to the north, you will find the Citadella (see separate tips for both). The way down from Gellert Hill towards castle hill leads you to a small park with some sculptures. One of them shows the marriage of Buda and Pest. Find details about that among the “Off The Beaten Path” tips.

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  • ophiro's Profile Photo

    Gellert hill - Liberty monument

    by ophiro Written Jul 13, 2008

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    On top of Gellert hill , 235 meters high , you will find a beautiful monument called the liberty monument.

    The monument is 14 meters high and was built in 1947 to remember the Soviet liberation of the country from the German Nazi forces during the second world war.

    The monument was designed by Zsigmond Kisfaludi Strobl , a hungarian sculpture.

    The monument can be seen from many places in the city but the problem is that when you climb the Gellert hill and stand close to the monument he is so big that you can even see him or capture a good picture.

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  • ophiro's Profile Photo

    Gellert Hill

    by ophiro Written Jul 13, 2008

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    Sunrise over Budapest
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    Gellert hill (Gellerthegyin Hungarian) is a nice hill with a great view to the Danube.
    The hill is 235 meters high and you can climb by foot or with a taxi/bus.

    The view from here is very beautiful and on your way you can see the Cave chappel , Gellert hotel and bath ,Gellert statue and of course the famous liberty statue.

    I recommend climbing by foot - very nice walk.

    The hill is named after St. Gellert (Gerard) that was thrown to his death from this hill.

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