Hungarian National Gallery, Budapest

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  • "St. Anne" Leibic (on the right) 1520.
    by breughel
  • 20th Century art.
    20th Century art.
    by breughel
  • Hungarian National Gallery - Hall.
    Hungarian National Gallery - Hall.
    by breughel
  • Dorqa's Profile Photo

    Wine Wednesday with guided tours in English

    by Dorqa Written Jul 18, 2014
    Wine Wednesday

    In July, the Hungarian National Gallery is organising each Wednesday an event called “Wine Wednesday” (Borszerda), which is certainly worth attending. The event combines museum guided tours, with wine tasting and with music and dance shows for the price of only two regular entrance tickets (2800 HUF – aproximately 9 EUR or 12 USD). If you also add to this that with the event ticket you can visit the recently opened temporary exhibitions built around the avantgarde movements and even enjoy the splendid view of the city from the dome terrace (which is not always open), then I am sure that this makes a good argument for spending the next two Wednesday evenings at the Hungarian National Gallery. One of the best things about the Wine Wednesday is that it happens during the week and after the normal business hours: the programmes start at 18:00 and last till 22:00.

    Below you will find the detailed programmes of the upcoming two Wine Wednesdays.

    July 23rd, 18.00-22.00
    In the focus: The West
    Wine region: Pannonhalma, the cellars of the Abbey of Pannonhalma

    Guided tour:
    18.30-19.00 Highlights of Hungarian Art – guided tour in English
    Dance:
    19.00-19.20 The National Dance Theatre presents: Argentinian Tango Dance – theatre
    Music:
    19.30-21.15 Pátkai Rozina quartet

    July 30th, 18.00-22.00
    In the focus: The East
    Wine region: Tokaj, Sauska Cellars

    Guided tour:
    18.30-19.00 Highlights of Hungarian Art – guided tour in English
    Dance show
    19.00-19.20 The National Dance Theatre presents: Feledi János – Feledi Project
    Music:
    19.30-21.15 Hajdu Klára quartet

    With the event ticket you can visit the following temporary exhibitions:

    Dada and surrealism. Magritte, Duchamp, Man Ray, Miró, Dalí. Selection from the collections of The Israel Museum from Jerusalem
    Rearranged reality. Creative strategies in the Hungarian art under the influence of dada and surrealism
    (Movie) experiments which come to life. The first movie of the avantgarde

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    A "must see"

    by Dorqa Updated Jul 14, 2014

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    If you wish to become familiar with the Hungarian art, this is the place for you! This is the museum which has the largest public collection of Hungarian works of art ranging from medieval and renaissance stone carvings and panel paintings up to the recently revamped permanent exhibition presenting Hungarian art created after 1945.

    The visit is especially worthwhile as the museum is located within the very nice historical surroundings of the Castle District inside the building of the former Royal Palace. On the first floor there is a very nice terace from where you have a lovely view over the Danube and if you go up to the third floor, you can even visit the terace of the dome of the building which gives a view over the whole city.

    As my experience with friends from abroad is that they always worry whether there is enough "English language coverage" when visiting any museum in Budapest, here are some facts:
    - right at the entrance you will find large information boards in English which help you identify the most important things you need to know before buying the ticket: entrance fees and applicable discounts, opening hours, special daily programmes, etc.
    - cashiers speak English fluently, and some of them even speak another foreign language as well. You can pay your ticket in cash (HUF is the only accepted curreny) or credit card.
    - the information desk of the museum is operated by professional volunteers who speak fluently at least another foreign language besides English. This is where you can get any information you need about the museum, its collections and its services. The information desk has brochures, museum floor plans and lots of other printed materials which you may find useful. The audio guide for the permanent exhibition is available in the following languages: English, German, Italian and French, whereas for the temporary exhibition it is available only in English.

    As a self-taught art-history student I am regularly dragging my family and/or friends to the museum and they usually come along as there are always special events besides the exhibitions, like in July each Wednesday the museum is organising the "Wine Wednesdays", when the opening hours are extended to 10:00 p.m and many programs (music, dance show, wine tasting, etc.) make the evening exciting, especially if you are after a hard working day or let's say after a business meeting in Budapest :)

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    Crypt beneath the Hungarian National Gallery

    by Dorqa Written Jul 13, 2014

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    Interior of the Palatinal Crypt

    Not many people know, not even the locals, that while visiting the Hungarian National Gallery, one can also take a tour of the Palatinal Crypt. Access to the Crypt is through the main entrance hall of the museum. It is one of the extremely few parts of the former Royal Palace (the foundations of which date back to medieval times) that survived through time. The palace was rebuilt and extended several times between the XVth and the XXth century, but today it can only show its ancient magnificence through the exterior design which was reconstructed after the war; however, the interior – housing the National Gallery, the Budapest History Museum and the National Széchényi Library - preserves only very little of the historical building.

    The Palatinal Crypt was the burial-place of the Habsburg palatines (viceroys), who governed Hungary from the late XVIIth century till 1848 (during this period the Kingdom of Hungary was part of the Habsburg Monarchy). It is worth visiting even for those who are not familiar with the history of Hungary or that of the Habsburg dynasty, because the three vaults of the crypt exhibit valuable works of art. The ceiling is decorated with frescoes depicting the starry sky and angels in the corners and the statues and sarcophagi of those buried here are indeed splendid masterpieces of Hungarian art.

    Visiting information: being a memorial place you can only visit the crypt by requesting a prior appointment. (Information and booking: +36 20 4397 408 E-mail: info@mng.hu). A guide will accompany you during the visit. The ticket cost is 600 HUF (aprox. 2 EUR) and can be purchased at any of the cashier desks of the Hungarian National Gallery.

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    Discovering Hungarian painters and sculptors.

    by breughel Updated Dec 28, 2013

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    Hungarian National Gallery - Hall.
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    The Hungarian National Gallery (Magyar Nemzeti Galeria) is located inside the Buda Castle (Budavari Palota) Buildings A / B / C / D. Entrance by the square with the equestrian statue of Eugène de Savoie.
    Not to confuse with the Historical Museum Budapesti Történeti Múzeum - Vármúzeum in the E building.

    This gallery with paintings and sculptures is one of the quietest parts of the castle as not much visited by tourists except for special exhibitions like now with French impressionists and post impressionists.

    The permanent collections include objects of Hungarian art from following periods:
    Medieval and Renaissance stonework
    Gothic panel paintings and wood carvings
    Late Gothic winged altars
    Late Renaissance and Baroque Art
    19th century painting
    19th Century Sculpture
    Munkácsy and realism of the century
    20th Before 1945 Century Art
    20th century art after 1945

    What attracted us most is the collection of paintings from the Hungarian school of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.
    We discovered with great interest realistic painters like Mihaly Munkacsy who were unknown to us (we are too accustomed to the French or Dutch schools). We had a real "coup de coeur" for "Misère" by J. Jendrassi (1896) and "Brother and sister" from A. Ferriyes.
    The titles of the works are translated into English.

    There was air conditioning in the museum, what with the 35 ° C outside was welcome.
    Open from 10 to 18 pm except on Mondays.
    Permanent collection price: 1400 HUF, reduced to 50% under 26 and over 62 years of EU, free for more than 70 years old. Fee to photograph: 500 HUF.

    There is a Chagall exhibition till 4/01/2014

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    20th Century art.

    by breughel Updated Oct 6, 2013

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    The art of the 20th c. is divided in works from before 1945 and later.
    Personally I preferred the first half of the century with a highlight such as "Brother and Sister" from Fenyes Adolf (1906) or his "Poppy-Seed Cake" 1910.
    From Ferenczy Karoly I liked this "Double Portrait" (1908).

    Among contemporary art works I got amused by this "Ironing bear, or the life is hard" from Kelemen Karoly 1985.
    I removed this photo because there could be a copyright (this work is from 1985) as VT put this photo on the Budapest travel page as illustration for the Hungarian National Gallery.
    Furthermore I think that this painting, certainly amusing, is not representative of the whole collection mainly consisting of realistic works from the 19th century.

    If I had to choose a work to illustrate this museum I would show "Brother and Sister" from Fenyes Adolf (1906) or a painting called "Misere" by Jendrassik Jeno in 1896.
    I looked for more info about this moving representation of a girl looking sadly and sitting at what seems to be a chemist shop but found nothing on the web (to make things confusing there is a homonym who was a physiologist). If somebody could tell me more about this picture, I'll be grateful.

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    Religious art - Hungarian Altarpieces.

    by breughel Updated Oct 5, 2013

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    The transition from the 19th and 20th c. paintings to the religious art was somewhat abrupt but not without interest.
    With age I became, quite logically, interested in tombs, I fancy the "gisants" (ref my reviews about Dijon Tomb of Philip the Bold.) but also in winged altarpieces. I developed some envy for historical personalities who after killing a fair number of their contemporaries paid for an altarpiece in some church to obtain forgiveness for their sins.

    Visiting museums over Europe I often met altarpieces made in my country (see my review Museum of Art and History (Brussels) - Carved altarpieces so that I was surprised and interested to see here Hungarian altarpieces whose style is different from those of Flanders or Brabant but closer to what I saw in the churches of Krakow The Choir of the Bazylika Mariacka..

    On the first floor and in the former throne-room of the palace are on display a total of fifteen winged altarpieces from the 15th and 16th century. They came from churches mainly located in Upper Northern Hungary. There had been winged altars in the whole territory of Hungary but the Turkish invaders and the Protestant iconoclasts destroyed many of them.
    From the parish church at Kisszeben were preserved an Annunciation altarpiece and sculptures from the high altar. Other typical altarpieces are the Virgin Mary from Nagyszalok and the St. Anne from Leibic.

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  • breughel's Profile Photo

    My favorite portraits.

    by breughel Written Sep 29, 2013

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    As the collection of paintings of the Hungarian National Gallery covers a few centuries from the Baroque to the second half of the 20th c. I enjoyed comparing some portraits from the different periods and styles.

    My favorites:
    Astonishing and my absolute favorite is this little girl called "Fifine" by Deak Ebner Lajos (1875).
    The painter was influenced by his friends Paál and Munkácsy and by the French as he staid in Barbizon and Paris. He was the leader of the School for Women Painters in 1887-1922 (! could not imagine this existed). I also much liked his "Woman Hauling Ship" (1881).
    Grown up our Fifine might well look like that woman painted by Szekely Bertalan "Study of a female head" 1880.
    Another highlight of the museum is the "Lady with Black Veil" by Rippl-Ronai Jozsef 1896. He also staid in Paris. His portraits of women are remarkable, they are "sublimated".
    In another style I liked from Zador Istvan "My Wife" (1910).

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    Hungarian 19th century genre pictures.

    by breughel Written Sep 29, 2013

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    Discovering Hungarian 19th century genre pictures.

    I got initiated and started liking genre pictures under the influence of the Dutch 17th c. painters who were I think the best in that type of subjects.
    The National Hungarian Gallery has on display a number of works from Hungarian genre painters. After the well known Munkacsy I halted in front of paintings from Karcsay Lajos who studied at the Munich Academy were he continued to live while sending his works to various exhibitions in Hungary in the 1880 - 1890s.
    Best known is the often reproduced "Apple Harvest" (or Gathering Apples) from 1886.
    Another typical genre painting is the tavern interior by Hollósy Simon (1888) but I preferred "Sunday afternoon" (1893) one of the major works of Bihari Sandor. I also liked a painting showing the "Communion".

    My favorite was a painting called "Misère" (French word misère = destitution, extreme poverty) by Jendrassik Jeno in 1896 showing a girl looking sadly and sitting at what seems to be a chemist shop.

    All interesting discoveries of the 19th century Hungarian school.

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    Munkácsy and realism of the 19th century.

    by breughel Updated Sep 29, 2013

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    Munkácsy Mihaly is the most famous painter of the 19th century Hungarian realism and it was very interesting to discover his works.
    Although Munkácsy was rewarded with the Gold Medal of the Salon de Paris in 1870 for his masterpiece "The Last Day of a Condemned Man" and lived later in Paris I haven't seen any work of him at the Musée d'Orsay.

    There are about 30 paintings of him on display in the Magyar Nemzeti Galéria.
    He excelled in genre pictures like "Making lint" (1871) and "Woman carrying faggot" (1873) but later he painted landscapes more in the impressionist style while he worked in Barbizon, France. I did especially like his "Alley" of 1886 and from his friend Paál László the "Road to Berzova" (1871).

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    Hungarian national gallery

    by mindcrime Written Dec 16, 2012

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    Hungarian national gallery
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    Hungarian national gallery (Magyar nemzeti galleria) is a great museum that is housed in the central wing of the Royal Palace of Buda castle.

    The museum was founded in 1957 and moved here in 1975. It is devoted to Hungarian art (for international artists check museum of Fine Arts) covering a long period from middle Ages to modern art (the arrangement is chronologically anyway). We just passed by the gothic period (14-15th centuries), checked some sculptures and painting from renaissance and baroque period but we focused more on painting from 19th century. We were a bit tired at the last section that houses art items from 20th century but still we enjoyed some paintings.

    pic 2:Csontvary Kosztka Tivadar : ruins of the greek Theatre in Taormina (1905)
    pic 3:Bernath Aurel:In the country (1941)
    pic 4:Ivanyi Grunwald Bela:Devotion (1891)
    pic 5:Fenyes Adolf:brother and sister (1906)

    It’s open Tuesday to Sunday 10.00-18.00
    The entrance fee is 1200FT but we payd 600Ft with Sziget City Pass.

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    Hungarian National Gallery at Buda Castle

    by Jefie Updated Nov 11, 2012

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    Hungarian National Gallery at Buda Castle
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    One of the perks of visiting the Hungarian National Gallery is that it gives you access to some of the 203 the stately rooms that were built and decorated in Baroque and Rococo styles during the reign of Maria Teresa (1740-1780). Descriptions are given to let visitors know what each room used to be. Established in 1957, the gallery's permanent collection houses Hungarian works of art from the Medieval era to the 20th century and thus serves as an interesting art history lesson. Not knowing much about Hungarian art, I thought it was especially interesting to see how it was influenced by the main European art movements. Temporary exhibitions are also on display.

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    Hungarian National Museum

    by katalin Written Jul 10, 2012

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    The Hungarian National Museum, National Museum, which collects artefacts of Hungarian history and present. Main building, Budapest, VII. district, the Museum boulevard. The museum's neoclassical style building, built between 1837-47, was designed by architect Michael Pollack, founder of Count Ferenc Széchenyi.

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    HUNGARIAN NATIONAL GALLERY

    by ViajesdelMundo Written Jul 30, 2009

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    I found this to be a most pleasant museum with such a wide range of art, to suit all tastes: Medieval and Renaissance stone carvings, panel paintings and woden sculptures from the Gothic Period; late Renaissance and Baroque art; 19th century paintings of famed Hungarian artists, Mihaly Munkacsy and Paul Laszlo, as well as much 20th century art.

    OPEN: Tues - Suns. 10 - 18:00

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    Hungarian National Gallery

    by mikey_e Written Jan 15, 2009

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    Hungarian National Gallery
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    The Hungarian National Gallery is housed inside Buda Castle and is one of the institutions through with the Communist government hoped to turn Buda Castle from a symbol of the old régime into a house of culture. Its collection is almost exclusively Hungarian and it frequently organizes special exhibits, some of which showcase new and emerging Hungarian artists. I visited the museum in 2004 (not on my latest trip) and I have to classify its collection along the lines of my much-ranted-about ethnographic museums. The Gallery includes works by nearly anyone and everyone who was Hungarian and even remotely known for their artwork. It is a good show of the various artistic talents of the Hungarian people and the history of artwork in Hungarian lands, but if you are not especially interested in that point, and are just looking for a gallery to learn a bit about Hungarian arts and culture, this may be a bit much. It has sculpture, paintings, stonework and coins, so, in a sense, it has something for everybody. Nevertheless, if you’ve made the trip out to Buda and have decided to make a day of it, it may be a good idea to visit.

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    Fine Arts in Hungary - Hungarian National Gallery

    by csordila Updated Nov 30, 2008

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    Exhibition rooms of 20th-Century Painting
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    The collection comprises thousands of Hungarian paintings and sculptures of all times from the 10th century right through to the present.
    The Gallery is made up of six permanent exhibitions from the mediaeval stone carvings till the artworks of present days. A real treat for art lovers and it is impossible to see all of them in one day. You shoud be selective, and concentrate only to the art works you are most interested in. My favourite is the 20th-Century Painting up to 1945.
    Guided tours in English, French, German, Italian, Russian, Spanish are available upon prior request.
    On the ground floor of Building C, you can visit the crypt of the Habsburg palatines (viceroys).

    Entrance fee 800 HUF, Budapest Card accepted, for details look on website
    Opening Hours: 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. every day except Monday

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