Mathias Church - Mátyás-templom, Budapest

4.5 out of 5 stars 106 Reviews

1014 Budapest, Orszaghaz utca 14 (+36 1) 489-0717

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    Matthias Church
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    Matthias Church ceiling
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  • Matthias Church
    Matthias Church
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  • JessieLang's Profile Photo

    Coronation Church

    by JessieLang Written Nov 21, 2010

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Coronation Church (actually named Matthias Church) was originally built by King Bela IV in the 13th Century after the Mongols left. The Turks converted it to a mosque in the 16th century and painted over the frescoes. Very little is left of the original building, and the current church is only a few centuries old. It has a colorful tile roof and beautiful 200-year old stained glass windows. The windows survived because they were taken out and stored before each war.

    Holy Trinity Statue
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    Matthias church

    by Sergiods Written Nov 16, 2010

    I some of the oldest church in Budapest who dates from 1255 by some documents, and the turks was ussed this by a mosque, during their occupation in Hungary, and after defeact of the turks the church was rebuild, at XIX century. This impressive church is very unique from the others of Budapest, and makes very special at this location on the castle hill.

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    # Phone: (+36 1) 489-0717
    # Directions: In the Castle District, next to Fisherman's Bastion. 'Varbusz' service from Moszkva ter metro to Szentharomsag ter or bus #16 from Deak F. ter to Disz ter.
    # Website: http://www.matyas-templom.hu

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  • muratkorman's Profile Photo

    Another famous church

    by muratkorman Updated May 1, 2010

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    You can't miss Matthias Church as it is one of the dominating buildings in Castle Area. Located just beside Fishermen's Bastion, this gothic church has a history reaching 13th century. The current name comes from King Matthias who got married twice in this church and who has been the main donor. The tiles on the roof make this church remarkable. There is a museum inside the church which exhibits artifacts and relics. However, in recent years it is under renovation and still not open to public. When you are in castle region, you must pay a visit to this beautiful church. Admission fee is 750 HUF.

    1 4 3 2 Inside view
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    St. Matthew church

    by german_eagle Written Apr 3, 2010

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    St. Matthew - or Matyas-templom in Hungarian - is the church where the Hungarian Kings were crowned. That alone makes it a place of outstanding historic significance for the country. Originally the church was dedicated to St. Mary and the name was Church of Our Lady. In the 19th century it got the name of Matthias Corvinus, the most important Hungarian King of the 15th century. It had been Matthias Corvinus who gave order to enlarge and redesign the existing parish church of the German settlers, thus contributed majorly to the appearance of the church.

    The Turks later turned the church into a mosque, after Buda's liberation from the Turkish the church fell to the Jesuit order and was reconstructed in Baroque style. In 1867 St. Matthew saw the coronation of Hapsburg Emperor Franz Joseph I and Elisabeth to Hungarian King and Queen (on which occasion Franz Liszt composed his famous coronation Mass).

    Unfortunately most of what you see nowadays is 19th century neo-Gothic style. The colourful Zsolnay ceramic tiles on the roof, the tall southern spire, the western facade, the dark fresco decoration inside, the stained glass windows - it's all 19th century. Even the (beautiful) grave of King Bela III and his wife Anne de Chatillon are neo-Gothic 19th century. Basically the only remaining really old piece is the stunning Gothic St. Mary portal at the southern side of the church.

    The church is currently undergoing thorough restoration works. Thus the tall southern spire was under scaffolding, the museum and treasure chamber were closed. Unbelievable, but the admission fee was not reduced. Yes, there's an admission fee - HUF 700! You need to buy the ticket vis-a-vis the entrance (south side) before you enter the church.

    St. Matthew, southern spire under scaffolding choir of St. Matthew from Fishermen's bastion St. Mary portal grave of King Bela III and Anne de Chatillon main altar and choir
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    Mátyás-templom

    by illumina Written Jan 17, 2010

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    Originally constructed around 1015 and rebuilt in the early 14th century, this church is actually dedicated to Our Lady, but is popularly know as Matthias' church after King Matyas Corvinus (1443-90) who not only caused the tower to be rebuilt, but was married there twice. It was also the setting for a number of coronations. During the Ottoman occupation, after 1541, it became a mosque. It was damaged during the seige of Buda in 1686, (during which a vision of the Virgin Mary is said to have appeared to the Turks, after which they lost the city), and was rebuilt later that century, and restored again during the 19th century.

    Sadly it was undergoing further restoration while I was there, so I could only see the exterior, covered by scaffolding as it was (hence you can only see the rounded apse in the photo).

    St Matthias church next to the Fisherman's Bastion
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    St Matthias Church

    by Tom_Fields Updated Apr 27, 2009

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    Named for King Matthias, who was married here in the 15th century, this church originally dated back to the 13th century. Austria-Hungary's last two kings, Franz Joseph and Charles IV, were crowned here.

    Most of the present church was built in the 1890s. It's an excellent example of late Baroque architecture.

    St Matthias The interior of the church The nearby Column of the Trinity
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  • mikey_e's Profile Photo

    The miraculous church

    by mikey_e Written Jan 15, 2009

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    Matthias Church is the second-largest Gothic church in Buda, and is one of the spectacular sights of the Castle District. The first church that was built in this sport was constructed in 1015, but it was reconstructed in the 14th century. The church’s name comes from King Matthias, who order the construction of the characteristic tower on the south side of the church. Much of the church was destroyed not just in the Christian siege of Ottoman-occupied Budapest but earlier than that, when the building was converted to a mosque and the interior was completely stripped and whitewashed. Apparently, during the 1686 siege, the Christians made a direct hit on the church-mosque and one of the walls crumbled. A votive statue of the Virgin was uncovered – in front of the entire mosque full of praying soldiers. The city fell on the same day thanks to a complete collapse in Ottoman morale. Restoration work was, fortunately, long: no one really completed anything that fully pleased the people of Buda until the turn of the 19th century, when Schulek (responsible for the nearby Fisherman’s Bastion) uncovered some of the original Gothic characteristics of the church and added his own neo-Gothic touches (the roof tiles and the Gargoyles) to give Mátyás király its current unique form. When I visited there was some heavy work underway, perhaps in preparation for the millennium anniversary of the first church in this area. Unfortunately, it obscured the incredible Gothic tower too much.

    M��ty��s kir��ly under the scaffolding The monument out front of church
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    Matthias Church

    by Robmj Written Jan 4, 2009

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    This 700 hundred year old medieval church is a stunner.

    It has been built and destroyed and reconstructed over the years but today is very beautiful. Inside a fantastic led lights, a number of notable paintings and a section with artifacts and a little of hungary's history set out in rooms in upper floors. When I visited, they had the sensational old crown of Hungary on display.

    Daily admission is from 9am-6pm and will cost you 400Ft.

    Well worth a visit.

    Led Lights inside the church Matthias Church & St Stephens Statue
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  • cjg1's Profile Photo

    Restoration in Progress

    by cjg1 Updated Dec 22, 2008

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    We were fortunate to be staying in the Castle District so the Mathias Church was right near our hotel. The Church is under a major renovation to restore it to its former glory. The church is named after Matthias Corvinus, who was a great Hungarian King.

    The exterior of the church is alrge and impressive. The tiled roof is beautiful and I can't wait to see it fully restored. Inside the church is the Ecclesiastical Art museum. There is a medieval crypt and leads up to the St. Stephen Chapel. There are several relics, stone figures and a replica of Hungarian royal crown jewels.

    The Chuch with scaffolding Beautiful Roof
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    Fisherman's Church

    by BruceDunning Updated Aug 9, 2008

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    This is called Church of our Lady and has been here since 13th century. King Mathias had his wedding here to one of his two wives. Many royalty were married and buried here. The interior has an influence of Muslim religion because they controlled this area for 300 years when the Turks invaded and took control in 1541. The Hapsburgs retook the territory in 1686, and the church was rebuilt in neo-Gothic style, but the Byzatine paintings/colors still adorn the columns. The columns and much of the other is done by them in that time.
    Time are 9-5 daily, except Sunday for 1-5. Cost is 60 Huf.

    Sculpture of church Interior blended watercolors Alter that is gilded Column to the alter View of church and statue
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  • ophiro's Profile Photo

    Matthias church

    by ophiro Written Jul 19, 2008

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    Matthias church (Matyas Templom in Hungarian) is one of the major attractions in Budapest.

    The church , believed to be built in 1015, is located in the castle district area and build in Gothic style.

    Very close to the church you will see also the fisherman bastion.

    from the Danube
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    Inside the Matthias church-details

    by 1courage Updated May 23, 2008

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    It`s quite unusual for a tourist who comes from Western Europe, seeing all these ornaments and frescos in this gothic church. Probably because this is a sign of an oriental influence wich isn`t unparraleled in Budapest, enough to look at the Gellért hotel and the other secessionist masterpeaces. But this isn`t a secessionist peculiarity: this church was richly painted even in the Medieval times. This is why Schulek and Bertalan Székely, one of the biggest hungarian painters ever, decided to revive the old splendour, and using the original geometric forms, found during the excavations, they created this very unique internal decoration: you cannot see one identical ornament to the other!
    Also the fantasting stained glass windows were created on plans of Székely in Ede Kratzmann`s manufactory.
    Most of the frescos are Károly Lotz`s work, the most famous hungarian fresco painter.

    Stupendous stained glass window Detailel with balcon and gothic window detail of the northern side nave One of the frescos lovely side altar
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    Church of Our Lady or Matthias Church

    by RuiPT Written Apr 22, 2008

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    Next to the Royal Palace, the Castle District's most popular tourist area is Trinity Square (Szentháromság tér). In the heart of this square is the magnificent Matthias Church (Mátyás Templom). Officially named as the Church of Our Lady, it referred to as Matthias church because the south tower bears the coat of arms with the raven of Matthias (Good King Matyas).
    In the thirteenth century Buda’s first parish church stood here. In the fourteenth century it was rebuilt as a Gothic hall church, but it was never finished and the north tower was not built. In Turkish times it became the main mosque and its interior furnishing were destroyed. During the 1686 siege, its tower and roof collapsed. Later, the church was rebuild in the Baroque style, and in the last decades of the nineteenth century, Frigyes Schulek reconstructed the church to its original 13th century plan, from the excavated medieval remains, the original Gothic church, the one in which Charles Robert (1308-1342) and Sigismund of Luxembourg (1387-1437) had been crowned, and in which King Matthias married Catherine Podebrad in 1463 and Beatrice of Aragon if 1470. By also adding new motifs of his own (such as the diamond pattern roof tiles and gargoyles laden spire) Schulek ensured that the work, when finished, would be highly controversial. Today however, Schulek's restoration provides visitors with one of the most prominent and characteristic features of Budapest's cityscape. The last two kings of Hungary, Francis Joseph I and Charles IV, were also crowned in this church, in 1867 and 1916 respectively. During World War II the damage suffered by the church was so heavy that it took

    The square in front of the church

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    Castle District: Matthias Church

    by antistar Updated Jan 12, 2008

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    The tall and distinctive spire of Matthias Church provides a great reference point for the castle district, as well as being a beautiful Baroque building. Its clean white lines hide a troubled past, however. During Turkish rule the church was stripped of its treasury, and its ornately frescoed walls were whitewashed, and the whole place was turned into a Mosque for the duration of Hungary's Turkish period.

    The modern church, like the Fisherman's Bastion it sits next to, was mostly the result of work dating from the end of the 19th century.

    Matthias Church, Budapest Matthias Church, Budapest Matthias Church, Budapest Matthias Church, Budapest

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  • rcsparty's Profile Photo

    Matthias Church

    by rcsparty Updated Dec 1, 2007

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    Matthias Church was built between the 13th and 15th centuries, and given Neo-gothic style in the 19th century. The church is just beside the Fisherman's Bastion in the Castle area. It is called Matthias church, because King Matthias was married twice in the church and was a major contributor. It has also served as a Mosque during the Turkish occupation and as a Jesuit church. The last two Hapsburg kings were corronated in this church. The church is beautiful and is located in a great area to stroll around for an afternoon.

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