Mathias Church - Mátyás-templom, Budapest

4.5 out of 5 stars 106 Reviews

1014 Budapest, Orszaghaz utca 14 (+36 1) 489-0717

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  • Matthias Church
    Matthias Church
    by balhannah
  • Matthias Church ceiling
    Matthias Church ceiling
    by balhannah
  • Matthias Church
    Matthias Church
    by balhannah
  • 1courage's Profile Photo

    Inside the Matthias church-the naves and the Altar

    by 1courage Updated Oct 31, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The interiors of the Matthias church are marvellous, even if the complete renovation -wich by the way has already begun outside, with the towers and the facades- is inevitable. Every single squaremetre is beautifully ornated with figurative and non figurative adornments (for example leafs, flowers, geometric forms...ecc...). The weakest point of the church is the illumination wich will be completely changed: it`s difficult to appreciate these ornaments, because the church is quite dark and the lights are dazzling. To be noticed the beautiful banners of the 1848-49 Revolution and Independence war wich can be foung on both side of the main nave, on the pillars of the side naves.

    The main Nave The main altar gothic-neogothic arches The sanctuary The choir with the organ
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  • Ewingjr98's Profile Photo

    Matthias Church

    by Ewingjr98 Updated Oct 17, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Founded in 1015, Matthias Church is the oldest and most important religious facility in the city. The original church was destroyed by the Mongols in 1242, then was rebuilt by King Bela IV from 1250 to 1270. In the 1300s, the kings of Hungary were appointed in this church prior to taking the throne. After an earlier steeple collapsed, the modern bell tower was completed in 1470. When Buda was captured by the Turks in 1541, Sultan Suleyman converted the church to a Mosque. In 1686 the Christians finally recaptured the city and the church, only to see it partially destroyed by a great fire in 1723. The church was damaged several other times over the years including during World War II and by a bomber in 1994, but each time it has been rebuilt to greater glory.

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  • 1courage's Profile Photo

    Inside the Matthias church-tomb of Béla the III.

    by 1courage Written Sep 17, 2007

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    In the museum you can find Hunyadi László`s wife`s skull. Hunyadi was king Mátyás`s brother and was executed by the rival László the V.th.
    But undoubtly the most important reliquia of the church is the tomb of one of Hungary`s most important kings, Béla the 3rd (1172-1196) and his wife, (Chatîllon) Anna of Antiochia.
    The tomb can be find in the Holy Trintiy chapel, right beside the left side nave.
    The king was the father of Béla the IV. the king who founded this church wich today is part of the UNESCO world heritage list.

    The tomb of the king G��za the 3rd skull from the XV.th century III. B��la`s tomb the arches and the organ of the G��za chapel
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  • 1courage's Profile Photo

    Inside the Matthias church-museum and chapels

    by 1courage Written Sep 17, 2007

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    Beneath the choir, on the side opposite to the entrance you can see the entrance to a spiral staircase wich brings you to the side chapels, like the Saint Imre and the Saint László chapel. Inside these chapels you can see lovely sculptures (like the "obbligatory" Sissy statue, made by György Zala) and altars, richly ornated corridors, precious golden objects. These chapels are partially created in the baroque era and reconstructed in neogothic style. At the end of the corridors you can see the most original creation of the architect Schulek: the oratory and the royal staircase. In the oratory you find the balcony that you`ve seen in my previous tip. In this room you can find the replicas of the hungarian regalia.

    lovely gothic altar eclesiastic objects Sissy statue corridor inside the museum Altar in a side chapel
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  • leffe3's Profile Photo

    Matyas Templom

    by leffe3 Updated May 4, 2007

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    Parts of the church, which dominates Trinity Square and is a major part of the 'tourist run' close as it is to the Fisherman's Bastion, date from the 15th century, although the majority of the building was completed in the 19th century in the neo-gothic style. It gains its name from Matthias Corvinus - the 15th century monarch who was married in the (original) church. It is one of the most revered of all churches in Hungary. The interior is a spectacular array of stained glass windows, frescoes and wall paintings by Károly Lotz and Bertalan Székely, celebrated Romantic artists of the 19th century. There's also a rather wonderful and colourful roof.

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  • viddra's Profile Photo

    Coronation Church

    by viddra Updated Apr 8, 2007

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Matthias Church dominates the famous Bastion.

    Its official name is the Church of Our Lady, and it was built between the 13th and the 15th centuries. Its name comes from King Matthias, who got married here twice and was the main donor. During its long history it was for some time a Mosque and a Jesuits’ Church.

    Inside the church you can also admire some interesting collections of goldsmiths’ masterpieces, stones and relics.

    Many concerts take place here as well.

    the church
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  • klj&a's Profile Photo

    St Matthius Church

    by klj&a Updated Mar 25, 2007

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    The thing that strikes me about St Matthius Church were the multicolored tiles on the roof. The church was first built in the 13th century, but due to destruction and renovation has changed a lot over the century. The church as it is now was completed in 1970 after damaged caused during WWII.

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  • 1courage's Profile Photo

    The Matthias church

    by 1courage Updated Jan 18, 2007

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    The construction of this splendid gothic-neogothic church dates back to the XIII.century. It was originally constructed in roman style. In the middle ages it was modified several times. The famous hungarian king Mátyás Hunyadi (Matthias) held 2 times his weddings in this church, wich since these historical events wears his name. After 1541, when the turks occupied the Buda castle it was transformed into a mosque. In the XVIII.century, like many other churches, also this one was transformed in baroque style. Only in the late XIX.century regained it`s original style and beauty thanks to Frigyes Schulek, who dedicated decades to study this church and to make the plans for the reconstruction, keeping every single originally medieval part..
    Note: actually the curch is under renovation. This will last for several years.

    The church from the T��rnok street The Matthias church from South (Episcopal Garden) Church with the Hilton Hotel from Fortuna street The church from the Fishermen`s bastion The church from behind

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  • sinisar's Profile Photo

    Mátyás-templom

    by sinisar Written Dec 14, 2006

    Officially named as the Church of Our Lady, it has been popularly named after the greatest Hungarian king, Matthias Corvinus, "Matthias the Just", known in Hungarian as Mátyás király, who ordered the construction of its original southern tower. In many respects, the 700 year history of the church serves as a symbol (or perhaps a reminder for Hungarians) of the city's rich, yet often tragic history. Not only was the church the scene of several coronations, including that of Charles IV in 1916 (the last Habsburg king), it was also the site for King Mátyás' two weddings (the first to Catherine of Podiebrad and, after her death, to Beatrice of Aragon).

    www.wikipedia.com

    02. V 2006. 09:54

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  • metallemon's Profile Photo

    One of the most beautiful buildings

    by metallemon Written Dec 12, 2006

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Buda side, Old City. A Cathedral built by King Matyas. I was impressed by the external and I do like the architecture.
    Inside there is a museum at the upper floor, and some small chapels. When we visited the church a rainfall has started and we’ve been there for about 45 minutes. We had the chance to watch a concert from a choir.
    In my opinion catholic churches have a more ìõóôáãùãéêÞ atmosphere than orthodox churches. All that statues, music…
    I found Matyas templom one of the most beautiful buildings in Budapest

    The church's organ The vitros Matyas Church Matyas Church

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  • mikarov99's Profile Photo

    Mattias Church

    by mikarov99 Updated Nov 26, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    I some of the oldest church in Budapest who dates from 1255 by some documents, and the turks was ussed this by a mosque, during their occupation in Hungary, and after defeact of the turks the church was rebuild, at XIX century. This impressive church is very unique from the others of Budapest, and makes very special at this location on the castle hill.

    Beautiful Church, bad pic :(
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  • nicolaitan's Profile Photo

    The Buda Church of Our Lady ( 5 photos)

    by nicolaitan Written Nov 14, 2006

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    LIke much of Budapest, this church has a long history of destruction and reconstruction in the architectual style of the moment. It sits at the high point of Castle Hill, its towers dominating the skyline. First a Gothic church in the 13th Century, it was enlarged during the reign of Matthias Corvinus who ruled from 1458-90. Known as "the just", he reunited Hungary after years of feudal bickering. He married twice here, the second to Beatrice of Aragon who instilled an interest in art and architecture, bringing with her the Renaissance spirit. He expanded the church and is variously stated to have commissioned one or both of the major towers.
    Between 1541-1686, under Turkish Rule, the Church was converted to a mosque. The sacred art was covered by scenes from the Koran and the fine furniture removed and destroyed in large part. Attempts to restore the church after the Turks were ousted were unsuccessful until the late 19th Century when architect Frigyes Schulek recreated the church in a neo gothic style. The original frescoes were uncovered and he added the famous gargoyles and beautiful multicolored diamond pattern roof tiles.
    The interior is decorated with paintings by famous 19th Century Hungarian artists including Karoly Lotz. There are beautiful rose windows and altars as well as a museum containing replicas of the Hungarian royal crown and jewelry, stone carvings, and other sacred items. Some of the relics date back to King Bela III in the 13th Century.

    The church has functioned for royal weddings and coronations for hundreds of years. The last 2 Habsburg kings were coronated here. Today, besides being a functioning church, there are frequent concerts and recitals because of the good acoustics. It was also a filming location for a horror movie by Michele Soavi entitled, unsurprisingly, The Church.

    Image 1 details the roof and towers. On image 2, the dominating postion of the church as seen from the Chain Bridge. Image 3, the view across Holy Trinity Square. Images 4 and 5 further detail the exterior.

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  • margaretvn's Profile Photo

    the Matthias Church.

    by margaretvn Updated Aug 20, 2006

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    It is officially called the Church of Our Lady but is named after the main donor King Matthias, he was married here. It was built in the 13th -14th century in Gothic style. In 1541 when the Turks occupied Buda it was turned into a moque and the frescoes were whitewashed. After the retaking of Buda the church went to the jesuits and they made Baroque changes. It became a parish church in 1773. It was restored in the second half of the 19th century and rebuilt in Neo-Gothic style.

    the Matthias Church. the Matthias Church. the Matthias Church.
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  • keeweechic's Profile Photo

    Mathias Church

    by keeweechic Updated Aug 10, 2006

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    The Mathias Church sits right in the centre of Buda's Castle District. Officially its name was the Church of Our Lady but known and named as Mathias church after King Matthias Corvinus who instructed for the church’s southern tower to be built. Many royal weddings and coronations have been held in the church.

    Inside the church there is a Ecclesiastical Art museum. This starts in the medieval tomb and leads up to the St Stephen Chapel. The gallery holds numerous sacred relics and medieval stone carvings, together with copies of the Hungarian royal crown and coronation jewels.

    The square and neighbouring streets around the church is so pretty with colourful little houses.

    Open daily 9am-5pm

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  • violetnon's Profile Photo

    Mathias Church: Reflection of the History

    by violetnon Updated Apr 23, 2006

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    The church takes lace in Buda's Castle District. It is very beautiful church although it faced many difficulties during the history.

    The appoxiametely 700 year history of the church is a reflection of the history of city in some sense.

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