Mathias Church - Mátyás-templom, Budapest

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1014 Budapest, Orszaghaz utca 14 (+36 1) 489-0717

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  • Matthias Church
    Matthias Church
    by balhannah
  • Matthias Church ceiling
    Matthias Church ceiling
    by balhannah
  • Matthias Church
    Matthias Church
    by balhannah
  • nicolaitan's Profile Photo

    The Buda Church of Our Lady ( 5 photos)

    by nicolaitan Written Nov 14, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

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    LIke much of Budapest, this church has a long history of destruction and reconstruction in the architectual style of the moment. It sits at the high point of Castle Hill, its towers dominating the skyline. First a Gothic church in the 13th Century, it was enlarged during the reign of Matthias Corvinus who ruled from 1458-90. Known as "the just", he reunited Hungary after years of feudal bickering. He married twice here, the second to Beatrice of Aragon who instilled an interest in art and architecture, bringing with her the Renaissance spirit. He expanded the church and is variously stated to have commissioned one or both of the major towers.
    Between 1541-1686, under Turkish Rule, the Church was converted to a mosque. The sacred art was covered by scenes from the Koran and the fine furniture removed and destroyed in large part. Attempts to restore the church after the Turks were ousted were unsuccessful until the late 19th Century when architect Frigyes Schulek recreated the church in a neo gothic style. The original frescoes were uncovered and he added the famous gargoyles and beautiful multicolored diamond pattern roof tiles.
    The interior is decorated with paintings by famous 19th Century Hungarian artists including Karoly Lotz. There are beautiful rose windows and altars as well as a museum containing replicas of the Hungarian royal crown and jewelry, stone carvings, and other sacred items. Some of the relics date back to King Bela III in the 13th Century.

    The church has functioned for royal weddings and coronations for hundreds of years. The last 2 Habsburg kings were coronated here. Today, besides being a functioning church, there are frequent concerts and recitals because of the good acoustics. It was also a filming location for a horror movie by Michele Soavi entitled, unsurprisingly, The Church.

    Image 1 details the roof and towers. On image 2, the dominating postion of the church as seen from the Chain Bridge. Image 3, the view across Holy Trinity Square. Images 4 and 5 further detail the exterior.

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    Mathias Church

    by MalenaN Written Mar 16, 2006

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    Mathias Church is easy to recognise with its lovely tower and the colourful tile on the roof. The church dates back to the 13th century, but has several times been reconstructed and in the late 19th century it got a neo-Gothic look. The walls were then painted with geometrical and floral motifs.
    Up the stairs there is a Collection of Ecclesiastical Art.
    To enter the church it cost 600 ft.

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  • belgianchocolate's Profile Photo

    The Matthias church...

    by belgianchocolate Updated Nov 2, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness


    The famous landmark in Budapest.
    If you know a little about the history you
    will look with different eyes to this monument.

    The first stones were put together in the 13th
    century. The Turkish as well as the 'Habsburgers'
    did rebuild a parth of the church.
    The Turkish burned her down and repainted
    the church to turn her into a mosque.
    The 'Habsburgers' removed the gothic window
    and made some changes to give the church
    a baroque look. Also Jesuits and Franciscans
    left behind traces.

    'Frigyes Schulek' was given the order to make
    somthing of the church in 1873 since it was
    in very poor conditions at that time.
    He redesigned the building in what was
    the popular style at that moment. And that was
    eclecticism. For instance the 80 meters high
    tower is only for 2/3 authentic medieval..
    The top got rebuild by the new architect.

    The paintings on the inside are after old examples.
    And the rood , the so typical colorful roof is
    also from his hand.

    After the chuch got destroyed again in world
    war II , she got closed for a very long time.
    The restoration got only finished in 19710.

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  • cjg1's Profile Photo

    Restoration in Progress

    by cjg1 Updated Dec 22, 2008

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    The Chuch with scaffolding
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    We were fortunate to be staying in the Castle District so the Mathias Church was right near our hotel. The Church is under a major renovation to restore it to its former glory. The church is named after Matthias Corvinus, who was a great Hungarian King.

    The exterior of the church is alrge and impressive. The tiled roof is beautiful and I can't wait to see it fully restored. Inside the church is the Ecclesiastical Art museum. There is a medieval crypt and leads up to the St. Stephen Chapel. There are several relics, stone figures and a replica of Hungarian royal crown jewels.

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  • belgianchocolate's Profile Photo

    Inside the Matthis church...

    by belgianchocolate Written Nov 4, 2004

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    If you made it to the castle district I would
    for sure go inside the 'Matthis chruch'.
    The 'Matyas-templon' isn't completely original
    like I explained in previous tip. But the wall paintings
    alone inside make it worth a visit.
    When you first enter your eyes will need some
    time to adjust. Those kind of wall decorations
    I had never seen anywhere else.

    Another reason to visit the chuch is the small
    collection of sacral and religious art.
    Some old paintings , a marble statue of sisi ,
    that crown you will see appearing here and
    there and postcards and so on.
    This collection is exhibited on the choir
    gallery. So it gives you another point of
    vieuw on the interior of the church.

    Maybe also interesting to know is the fact that
    'Franz Liszt' 'Hungarian coronation mass'
    was first performed here. Concerts still take
    place here now and then.

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  • melissa_bel's Profile Photo

    Mathias Church

    by melissa_bel Written Aug 24, 2004

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    We only had 1 day in Budapest and didn’t know exactly where to go (we didn't really plan to stop). First stop was Mathias Church (or MÁTYÁS TEMPLOM), a beautiful church located in the Castle District. Officially, the Church is dedicated to Our Lady but it's been named after Mathias, one of the most famous and loved figures of Hungarian monarchy. It had a tumultuous story and was even converted to a mosque during Ottoman rule, re-created around the renmnant of the church in the the 19th century and then restored after World War II. Although the outside is neo-Gothic in style, the interior has a surprising Byzantine flair with its quite stunning mosaics and frescoes. There is a crypt that can be visited for a fee but it was too early to go.

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    St. Matthew church

    by german_eagle Written Apr 3, 2010

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    St. Matthew, southern spire under scaffolding
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    St. Matthew - or Matyas-templom in Hungarian - is the church where the Hungarian Kings were crowned. That alone makes it a place of outstanding historic significance for the country. Originally the church was dedicated to St. Mary and the name was Church of Our Lady. In the 19th century it got the name of Matthias Corvinus, the most important Hungarian King of the 15th century. It had been Matthias Corvinus who gave order to enlarge and redesign the existing parish church of the German settlers, thus contributed majorly to the appearance of the church.

    The Turks later turned the church into a mosque, after Buda's liberation from the Turkish the church fell to the Jesuit order and was reconstructed in Baroque style. In 1867 St. Matthew saw the coronation of Hapsburg Emperor Franz Joseph I and Elisabeth to Hungarian King and Queen (on which occasion Franz Liszt composed his famous coronation Mass).

    Unfortunately most of what you see nowadays is 19th century neo-Gothic style. The colourful Zsolnay ceramic tiles on the roof, the tall southern spire, the western facade, the dark fresco decoration inside, the stained glass windows - it's all 19th century. Even the (beautiful) grave of King Bela III and his wife Anne de Chatillon are neo-Gothic 19th century. Basically the only remaining really old piece is the stunning Gothic St. Mary portal at the southern side of the church.

    The church is currently undergoing thorough restoration works. Thus the tall southern spire was under scaffolding, the museum and treasure chamber were closed. Unbelievable, but the admission fee was not reduced. Yes, there's an admission fee - HUF 700! You need to buy the ticket vis-a-vis the entrance (south side) before you enter the church.

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  • Gypsystravels's Profile Photo

    Mathias Church - Church of Our Lady

    by Gypsystravels Updated Aug 7, 2008

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    Exterior of Mathias Church
    4 more images

    As you can see from my picture, a portion of the external part of the church was under renovation. The church is quite impressive and can be seen perched on top of Castle Hill in the "Old Town District". The church has a 700 year history and serves as a symbol of the city's rich and yet often tragic history.

    The building regained much of its former glory in the 19th century during the great architectual boom. Frigyes Schulek was the architect responsible for much of the work which is visible today. Not only was the church restored to its original 13th century plan but a number of early original Gothic elements were uncovered. He also added some new motifs of his own such as the diamond pattern roof tiles and gargoyles laden spire.

    I would recommend anyone paying a visit to this area to pay the nominal fee to view the interior of the church.

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  • m-joy's Profile Photo

    The Matthias Church at Buda hill

    by m-joy Written Jan 18, 2005

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    The most important church in Budapest stands on Buda Hill and is beautifully illuminated at night: the Matthias Church on Szentharomsag ter. Destroyed in wars, the ancient church, which was built in the 13th century, was rebuild much later in a Baroque style.

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  • dcwizard's Profile Photo

    Buda's Can't Miss Church

    by dcwizard Written Mar 9, 2004

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    Mike (London) and John (USA) at Matthias Chruch

    When wandering around Castle Hill in Buda, you won't miss the 13th Century Matthias Church (Mátyás templom), named for the king that rebuilt the church in 1470. The current church has been through many changes and renovations over the years. The church was converted into a mosque when the Turks occupied Buda, and it was severely damaged when they were driven out in 1686. The church was heavily damaged again during World War II. There are often musical performances in the church, such as concerts during the Christmas holidays and periodic performances of Mozart's Requiem, check the signs outside for details.

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  • Cristian_Uluru's Profile Photo

    Matyas Templom

    by Cristian_Uluru Updated Jun 9, 2005

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    Matyas Templom

    The Matyas Templom is the most important holy building of the town. It was built in a romanic style in 13th century when Carl Robert of Angio became king in 1309. In this wonderful church were celebrated two weddings: in 1463 with King Matyas and Katherine Podjenbrand and in 1470 with King Matyas and Beatrice of Aragon. In the 15th century during the kingodm of King Matyas were built the tower bell which took his name.
    During the Turkish occupation (1541-1686) the church became a mosque. During the war of liberation the church suffered many dameges.
    In 1874-1896 Frygyes Schulek restored the church and he led the church to its nowday beauty. During the second war world the church suffered many damanges and in the cripta German create a Kitchen. Untill some years ago you can still see the black made by the smoke of the kitchen!!!!

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  • diocletianvs's Profile Photo

    St. Matthias Church

    by diocletianvs Updated Mar 20, 2004

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    Tower of St.Matthias church

    Mátyás templom, the St. Matthias Church, dominates the Trinity Square and is considered to be the sacred place for Hungarians. The old gothic church was used as the place for coronations, and the church still hides the remains of King Bela III (who reigned from 1173 –1198) and Queen Anne of Chantillon. The Treasury of the church also keeps the so-called “Matthias-chalice” as well as many exceptionally beautiful lithurgic accessories. The exact copy of the Black Madonna from the Italian Loretto can also be found here.

    Today’s structure of St. Mathias church is neo-gothic, redesigned by Frigyes Schulek in the late 19th Century. The interior was decorated by the most famous Hungarian historical painters of the 19th Century Bertalan Székely and Károly Lotz.

    The sculpture in front of the church is the 18th century thanks-giving memorial by the survivors of the plague epidemic, and dominates the Trinity Square.

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  • call_me_rhia's Profile Photo

    Matthias Church

    by call_me_rhia Written Feb 9, 2005

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    matthias church and column

    Matthias church is a beautiful neogothic church with impressively decorated roofs. It was the place where kings' coronations took place. The name Matthias comes from that of a King who got married twice in this church. The original structure, however, was very different: every century new parts were added and its style often changed: at one time it was even turned into a mosque (when Budapest was conquered by the Turks in 1541). Today, the church is well knwon not only for its architecture, but also for its acustic: perfect for concerts. In front ofthe church there's an ornated pillar, the Pillar of the Holy Trinity.

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  • kentishgirl's Profile Photo

    St.Mathias Church

    by kentishgirl Updated Oct 31, 2004

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    St.Mathias Church

    This church has the most amazing tiled roof! There are SO many colours!

    It is a beautiful church located in Buda, Parts of the church dates as far back as the 13th century but was extensively rebuilt during the 19th century.

    The Hungarian king Matyas held both his weddings here.

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  • IngaA's Profile Photo

    St. Matyas church

    by IngaA Written Jan 31, 2004

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    Matyas temple tower

    The elegant gothic church dominating the Buda Castl hill right over the Fishermen Bastion. Seen from everwhere, one of the best views is from the boat riding along Danube.
    Was built on the place of the old churches, thenm converted into a Mosque during the Turkish governamnce and then rebuilt as a Christian temple (templon) in times of Austrian-Hungarian empire. Keeps Oriental patterns inside and beautiful treasury museum.
    Entrance fee: 300 Ft.

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