Parliament - Orszaghaz, Budapest

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1055 Budapest, Kossuth tér 1-3. + (36) 1 441-4000

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  • Parliament - Orszaghaz
    by balhannah
  • View from Buda
    View from Buda
    by balhannah
  • Houses of Parliament
    Houses of Parliament
    by balhannah
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    THE HOUSES OF PARLIAMENT

    by balhannah Written Mar 23, 2014

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    Probably one of the most talked about buildings in Budapest!
    As it is situated on Pest's riverbank, I had a very good view of the magnificent building from the Boat, another from land, although I couldn't see much because of scaffolding and covers.
    These were here as they were cleaning the building, and what a good job they were doing. Looking at the clean and then the dirty, I was very happy to have seen the sparkling clean riverfront side!

    The Houses of Parliament may remind you of the ones in London, as these in Budapest were modeled after them. A neo-Gothic design by Imre Steindl, inspired by the Houses of Parliament in London, was chosen as the winner in a competition held to find a design for the new Parliament House.

    Construction began in 1885, then took another 17 years to complete in 1902. As it was the largest parliamentary building in the world, and has a very detailed exterior, it is no wonder it took this long.
    Parliament House is arranged around 10 central courtyards, has 27 decorated spires, an impressive dome, whilst the inside contains more than 20 km of staircase, as well as 691 rooms.
    The magnificent façade has 88 statues of Hungarian rulers, pointed arch arcades and numerous gargoyles, spires and Gothic ornaments. It really is an amazing piece of architecture!

    I didn't visit the interior because of the renovations taking place. Evidently, it is as stunning inside as outside. Neo-Gothic is mixed with Renaissance and even Byzantine influences. The decorated staircase hall, with granite Corinthian columns, gilded ornaments and a huge ceiling painting is a must see.
    The circular Copula Hall, which features statues of Hungarian monarchs, the coronation crown and insignia of King Stephen are displayed here underneath the intricate ceiling. The holy crown, as well was a scepter, orb and sword are displayed.

    To see the Interior of Parliament House, you NEED TO JOIN A TOUR GROUP

    Admission prices and entry times are found on this link.
    http://www.parlament.hu/angol/eng/tajekoztato.htm

    Tickest can be bought in advance online.

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    Renovation works.

    by breughel Written Jan 17, 2014

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    Parliament - works in 2013.
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    During my first visit to Budapest in 2006 I was staying on the avenue bordering the Danube on the Buda side and from my room I could see the Parliament. A part from the riverside façade was masked by scaffolding for the cleaning of the stones.
    The other part at the Kossuth Ter square was open so that one could admire the eastern facade of this magnificent building which competes with the Parliament in London with the advantage that the Danube is much larger than the Thames providing a better perspective.

    On my return in 2013 the renovation works had invaded the square in front and next to the Parliament with fences, scaffoldings and cranes. Not really nice to see.
    On the other hand the renovation of the river side façade was completed and from the Batthyany square on the Buda side one can admire the beautiful white façade contrasting with red-brown roofs.
    There is a cafe-restaurant with terrace on the Batthyany Ter just in front of the tram terminal and they serve excellent Hungarian white wines what increased my esthetic pleasure!

    Anyway the Hungarian Parliament is a beautiful architectural achievement and stands out from all the neoclassical parliaments encountered in our capitals.

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    Central Pest: Parliament

    by antistar Updated Oct 24, 2013

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    Parliament, Budapest
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    For me this is the most amazing building in Budapest, just edging out Buda Castle in magnificence. It's the center of all things political in Hungary, and this meant that when I was there the building had the added significance of being the stage of large political anti-government protests. A few days before I'd arrived in the city there had been riots in the city, with some hooligans even torching cars and buildings.

    The protest outside the Parliament the day I visited the building was much calmer, and also sleepier, despite being the day of national elections in the city. It seemed that a lot of the fire had petered out in the belly of the protesters. There even seemed to be more homeless people there than protesters; they had been attracted there by the free food. Add them to the countless police, the news reporters from all over the world, and the curious tourists, and I think the protesters would probably have been in a minority.

    The organisers were not put off, however. Traditional Hungarian songs blared out of the loud speakers, while several busy looking people rushed about getting things ready for what I guessed would be a much bigger gathering later on; the Russian reporter I spoke to hoped that it would get more interesting after it got dark. One man, clearly old enough to have seen the 1956 revolution, stood stalwartly with his Hungarian flag flying proud in the stiff wind with a hole cut out of the centre.

    Like the Chain Bridge, the Parliament adds another English touch to this part of the Danube, as its Gothic Revivalist style is very similar to that of Britain's own famous Parliament in London, and was built in the same century. It is absolutely huge, and it is estimated to have used 40 million bricks in its construction, along with half a million precious stones and 40 kilograms of gold. It contains nearly 700 rooms, 29 staircases, and ten courtyards within its walls.

    And not surprisingly, it looks incredible at night.

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    Parliament

    by shavy Written Aug 31, 2013

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    The Parliament Building
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    The grandiose Hungarian Parliament is one of Budapest's defining landmarks
    The only way to see all the building's attractions is to join one of the organized guided tours that are available when Parliament is not in session
    To get your ticket, look for the sign with the text "For buying tickets!" and join the line. The guard will let you in and you can proceed to the ticket office
    The ticket office will issue a ticket valid for a guided tour of a given date and time
    Once you have your ticket you have to join the second line (it is marked with a sign with the text "With tickets!") a few minutes before the time indicated on your ticket
    The guided tour takes about 50 minutes

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  • GentleSpirit's Profile Photo

    Changing the guard

    by GentleSpirit Updated Feb 2, 2013

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    On Friday, about sunset, I was right by the Hungarian Parliament Building. All of a sudden I noticed the military detachment was standing ramrod straight in formation and a few senior officers were there supervising the whole thing. The commander presented his detachment to the senior officers and afterwards several of the men proceeded to lower the Hungarian flag .

    A fairly simple ceremony, not much in the way of colors, barking out orders or accompanying music. The soldiers bringing the flag down from the podium was a little more of a show.

    I am assuming that the military unit that was in formation was the same one assigned to guard the Parliament and the Crown of St Stephen inside.

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    Hungarian Parliament

    by mindcrime Written Dec 16, 2012
    Hungarian Parliament
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    The Hungarian Parliament Building (Országház) is the biggest building in Hungary and definitely one of the most impressive.

    It was built between 1882 and 1902 in neogothic style based on London’s parliament (yes, the famous Westminster). It has 700 rooms, 27 gates, 29 staircases and according to the official site about 50 five story apartment buildings could fit into the parliament!

    Unfortunately we didn’t have the time to visit it and check the interior but there are guided tours in different languages on specific times. Be there early as the tickets sell out fast in high season, in English the tours start at 10.00, 12.00 and 14.00, the entrance fee is 3500Ft (free for EU citizens) and tour is about 40’ long. If you check the official site you will find lot of information about the building and its history and many pictures, so now I know what I missed as the parliament building is full of beautifully decorated halls and rooms with numerous paintings, sculptures, you can even see the crown of king Stephen etc

    …but we took several pictures of the building anyway because it is located on the bank of Danube river so every time we were on the Buda side or going up the river by boat we took pictures of it. It looks beautiful during the day but what we really loved was taking pictures of it during the night…just check the third photo here. The official entrance is from the other side facing Kossuth square.

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    Seat of the Hungarian National Assembly

    by Jefie Updated Nov 7, 2012

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    Close-up view of the parliament's dome
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    The parliament of Budapest is one of the most beautiful buildings I've ever seen.This neo-gothic masterpiece is majestically seated on the bank of the Danube River. It was built between 1885 and 1904 after a competition was held in 1882 for its design and won by Imre Steindl, a professor at the local Techinical University. Its design was influenced by the Palace of Westminster, though in my opinion it is even nicer than the London landmark. Tours of the parliament are offered in different languages at fixed hours but unfortuntely, we didn't time it right so didn't get a chance to visit it. We had to content ourselves with walking around the building, which wasn't a bad option, but if I ever make it back to Budpest I'll make sure to put a visit of the parliament at the top of my list!

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    Hungarian Parliament

    by hungariangirl896 Written Aug 25, 2012

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    Dome of the Parliament building
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    The Hungarian Parliament is the biggest building in the nation and is one of Budapest's most recognizable and famous sights. It was done being built in 1902. The Parliament building includes almost 700 rooms and has a very beautiful interior. Inside you can see features such as the main staircase and lobby as well as the crown of St. Stephen. There are many small statues, paintings, decorations, etc. that illustrate historical moments of Hungarian history and honor noteworthy citizens. You can see the Parliament only on a guided tour. It's a very interesting and elegant place to see, so I definitely recommend a visit.

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    A walk in the Parliament

    by csordila Updated Apr 20, 2012

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    In the Parliament

    As everybody knows it, I was several times in our Parliiament as we call it: the Orzágház.
    At that time I was the developing maneger there.

    In Lajos Kossuth Square on the bank of the Danube, the Hungarian Parliament building stands out as one of the architectural landmarks of Budapest. Construction began in 1885, and it was completed in 1904. The building was built in Gothic Revival style with a symmetrical facade and a central dome. It is currently the largest building in Hungary -- the largest Parliament in Europe -- and the third largest Parliament in the world.

    Read more: http://www.virtualtourist.com/travel/Europe/Hungary/Budapest_Fovaros/Budapest-436839/Things_To_Do-Budapest-Parliament_Orszaghaz-BR-1.html#ixzz1sb75CkCA

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    The Hungarian Parliament - Országház

    by zadunajska8 Written Nov 28, 2011

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    The Hungarian Parliament - (old upper chamber)
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    The Hungarian Parliament is gothic grandeur in it's extreme. It's clearly built to impress and I would have guessed it to be larger than the Houses of parliament in London - but the guide said it isn't. Apparently it is Europe's 3rd largest parliament after Bucharest and London.

    The Parliament was built to accomodate an upper and lower house and so has 2 debating chambers (which I'm told are identical) but as the Hungarian state now only has a one chamber parliament only one is now used and the other is shown to tourists and rented out for conferences etc.

    You can only visit the Parliament on a guided tour. English language tours start at 10am, 12 noon and 2pm. We were told (and read in many guidebooks) that you had to get there early (ticket office opens at 8am) to get tickets for the days tours. There didn't seem to be any problem with availability when we went but this was November and so very off peak - it may be very different in summer. At the front of the building on Kossuth Square you will see that there will be a guard by two signs - 1 which says "with tickets" and one that says "without tickets". When you go to get your ticket you go to the "without tickets" sign and you will be directed towards a door into the building marked "Gate XI". The ticket office is in here. If you are an EU citizen then show your passport and you get your ticket for free. You will be told what time you tour is and to be at the "with tickets" sign 10 minutes before that time.

    If you did find that all the English tours have gone then you could try joining another one. If you speak another language then obviously go for that but actually the commentary was so difficult to hear most of the time it probably doesn't matter too much if you go on one where you don't understand a word of it!

    When you go back for your tour you wait at the "with tickets" sign (there is no shelter here from wind or rain) and when the guide is ready you will be asked to follow them to the side entrance where you pass through security. It's just the same as airport security so all metal objects into your bag etc. Once through you can retrieve your camera and start snapping away as you see fit.

    The tour takes only about 40 minutes and you see the main stairwell of the Parliament which is very ornate and then you are taken to the Hungarian crown jewels which are guarded by 2 soldiers who walk around the jewels in a circle every 15 minutes and every now and then they 'present arms' so stand at least 2 metres away unless you have any limbs you want removed! Then you are taken through a series of other lavishly decorated rooms to the old upper house debating chamber. Here you will be given some interesting commentary on the Hungarian Parliament (if you can hear and understand) before being escouted back out of the building.

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    Get your tickets early !

    by yankeepeddler Written Aug 1, 2011

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    Touring Parliament should be near the top of your "Must See" list as the interior is nothing short of exquisite. However; don't just show up as we did hoping to go right in. English language tours are offered only at 10AM , 12PM and 4PM and fill up quickly - especially in the summer. Tours last about 50 mins and cost 2520 HUF or about $14 USD. If you are facing the back of the building (not the Danube side), the ticket office is located just to the right of the central complex. You have to queue up to buy tickets; get your ticket and tour time and queue up again. Have a "Plan B" ready for how to spend your day - we were assigned the 4PM tour and it was FULL.

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  • Mafia and Contemporary Drug-market Museum

    by dfghfdgh Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    There is a very unique museum/exhibition in Budapest. Its partly about the classical Mafia in Sicily and USA and partly about the drug sitation in Budapest. Italian friends told me to see it, for it's very authentic. I was rather sceptic when they recommended it to me, but I am glad I finally went to see it. I prefered the drug-market part. I never thought drug is penetrating our world this much. Ask for guiding if you go there, they will tell you shocking things. And they open up your eyes to see drug addicts among your friends or relatives.
    The museum is very close to the Parliament, on the street starting in front of the Parliament.

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  • Kossuth Lajos ter - 1956 Eternal Flame

    by grkboiler Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    1956 Memorial

    On Kossuth Lajos ter just north of the entrance to Parliament is an eternal flame dedicated to those who lost their lives during the 1956 revolt against Communism. This was one of the most brutal acts in the history of the world.

    On October 23, 1956, students and workers gathered and made demands on the Communist regime. The AVO (Secret Police) was sent in and eventually opened fire on the crowd. When the Hungarian police arrived and heard of the shootings, they gave up their weapons to the protesters. The Soviet armies were called in and many of the soldiers joined the resistance.

    The premier who couldn't control the revolt was replaced by Imre Nagy, who immediately took sides with the revolution and announced Hungary was withdrawing from the Warsaw pact, forming a new government, and demanded the Soviet troops leave Hungary.

    The Soviet troops withdrew, but not all the way back to the USSR. They waited for reinforcements at the Hungarian border and on November 4, returned to Budapest and attacked with full force. Nagy broadcast over the radio to announce the attack, while radio transmissions were heard all over the West with pleas of HELP! Nobody answered.

    Many of the Soviet soldiers had no idea where they were and didn't know this was a revolt against Communism. Those who did not carry out orders were executed on the spot. One soldier who took a detour to avoid running over women and children blocking the street with his tank was killed. Eventually, the Soviets began taking over.

    When the revolt was over, almost 30,000 rebels were dead, 200,000 fled to the West leaving everything behind. Rebels who stayed were executed. Nagy found refuge in the Yugoslav embassy but was later captured, put in jail, and executed.

    Soviet leader Khrushchev sent resources to the Hungarian people to prevent another uprising, saying "We will shut their mouths with goulash".

    The website below is an excellent paper written about the Revolution in 1956.

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    Get Governmental

    by Jetgirly Written Apr 1, 2011

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    Hungarian Parliament Building, Budapest
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    No building in Budapest is more famous than the Imre Steindl-designed Parliament, which was finally completed in 1902. It now stands as the largest building in the nation, and the largest Parliament on the continent. When Parliament is not in session this massive building is open to the public, though it can be hard to get a much-coveted spot on one of the tours. Check the official website (linked below) for information on tour times, languages, costs (free for EU citizens!) and days of operation. Although this huge building has nearly thirteen miles of hallways and seven hundred rooms, you'll only get a peek on a guided tour. A highlight will be your glimpse of the Crown of St. Stephen (yes, THAT St. Stephen, of St. Stephen's Basilica), which has survived for nearly one thousand years and is now kept at the base of the main staircase.

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  • Raimix's Profile Photo

    Parliament

    by Raimix Updated Mar 4, 2011

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    Construction of this popular sight began in 1885, the architect was professional, had seen lot of architecture styles of Europe. The style is neo-gothic. The best view of this palace can be seem mostly only from another bank of Danube river. At the night time it is illuminated by lights very much.

    I have seemed United Kingdom Parliament only in the pictures, but this building in Budapest looks very similar with it in some ways.

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