Synagogue - Dohány Street Central Synagogue, Budapest

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1071 Budapest, Dohány utca 2.

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  • mallyak's Profile Photo

    The Great Synagogue

    by mallyak Written Dec 17, 2010

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    The Great Synagogue, also known as Dohány Street Synagogue (Hungarian: Dohány utcai zsinagóga/nagy zsinagóga, Hebrew: בית הכנסת הגדול של בודפשט‎ bet hakneset hagadol šel budapešt) or Tabakgasse Synagogue, is located in Erzsébetváros, the 7th district of Budapest. It is the largest synagogue in Eurasia[1] and the second largest in the world

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  • azz8206's Profile Photo

    The Beautiful Dohany Street Synagogue

    by azz8206 Updated Oct 4, 2010

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    Interior of the Dohany Street Synagogue
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    The Dohany Street Synagogue is the second biggest synagogue in the world and the biggest in Europe. It was built between 1854 and 1859 in a Moorish style reminiscent to the Alhambra in Spain and to other North African mosques. Inside it is very beautiful with a Moorish style gallery and ceiling with exceptionally pretty chandeliers hanging from them. There are two floors to the synagogue, the first for the men and the second for women.
    In the side courtyard is a cemetery for the many victims of the Holocaust. The Dohany Street Synagogue was part of the Jewish Ghetto during WW2 and over 2000 Jews that died in the ghetto from starvation and cold are buried here.
    In the rear courtyard is the Raoul Wallenberg Memory Park where the Memorial of the Hungarian Jewish Martyrs is located. It is a Memorial which is dedicated to the 400,000 Hungarian Jews murdered by the Nazis and resembles a weeping willow tree whose leaves bear inscriptions with the names of victims. The synagogue is within walking distance from Deak Ferenc Ter, about 5 minutes. This place along with the Shoes on the Danube are very sombre experiences which brought me close to tears.

    Entrance fee is 2000HUF. Guided tours are extra and there are three to choose from:
    Dohany Synagogue and Memorial Park-400HUF
    Dohany Synagogue, Memorial Park and Jewish Museum-750HUF
    Dohany Synagogue, Memorial Park, Jewish Museum and Rumbach Synagogue-1400HUF
    500HUF extra for picture taking.

    Hours of operation are:
    Monday to Thursday and Sunday-10am to 530pm
    Friday-10am to 330pm
    Closed on Saturdays and holidays.
    Friday and Saturday are open for services but you must be Jewish.

    Just an FYI. Raoul Wallenberg was a Swedish humanitarian who worked in Budapest during WW2. He saved tens of thousands of lives by issuing protective passports and housing Jews in buildings established as Swedish territory. Many memorials around the world are dedicated in his honour along with Israel's dedication as one of the Righteous Among the Nations. He is also an honorary citizen of Hungary, Israel, the US and Canada.

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  • ViajesdelMundo's Profile Photo

    DOHANY St. SYNAGOGUE

    by ViajesdelMundo Updated Jul 28, 2009

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    This is the world's second biggest synagogue today. Moorish style, designed by German architect, Ludwig Forster. Opened on 6 Sept 1859.

    There are guided tours in Hebrew and English, and can also be booked in season in French, German, Italian, Spanish and Russian. In addition to providing information about the synagogue, they also include much about the Hungarian history, which is a must for understanding the area.

    Opening hours: 1Nov - 31Mar 10am to 3 pm, Fridays and Sundays til 2pm; 1Apr - 31Oct 10am to 5pm, Fridays til 3pm and Sundays til 6pm.
    The synagogue and cashier close half an hour prior to to those times and is closed holidays and festivals. Groups of a minimum of 10 persons receive a discount.

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  • jumpingnorman's Profile Photo

    See Bulldozers around the Budapest Synagogue

    by jumpingnorman Written Jan 30, 2009

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    Bulldozer near Budapest Synagogue (tree of life)

    I first read about the Jewish Synagogue in Budapest while I was reading the National Geographic. It was an article on endangered sites around the world. Apparently, a lot of the old Jewish establishments around the Synagogue are being demolished since developers wanted to commercialize the area.

    True enough, when I visited the Synagogue in 2007, there was a huge bulldozer at the back (destroying some apartment), while I was at the famous metal “tree of life” which had the names of some Holocaust victims.

    The Great Synagogue in Dohány Street, also known as the Dohány Synagogue, or the Tabac-Schul, the Yiddish translation of dohány (tobacco), is the second largest synagogue in the world! It was finished in 1859 and can accommodate 3000 people.
    The area of the Synagogue is known as the inner part of the seventh district of Budapest, considered a Jewish ghetto during the Second World War when a wall was built around this area. It was time of oppression and Jews could only leave the ghetto with permission.

    Years later, the Synagogue still stands and used by an active Jewish community in Budapest. And I think its great that they are allowing tourists to enter their place of worship. They have even built a Jewish Museum in Synagogue itself, where I saw some old expensive looking menorahs.

    There are other synagogues in this area of Budapest, and you will also find some kosher restaurants and shops, a rabbi training school. Hopefully, commercialization will not ruin the character of this historical Jewish community.

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  • mikey_e's Profile Photo

    Europe's largest

    by mikey_e Written Jan 16, 2009

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    Moorish entrance to the Synagogue
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    In the 1910 census, nearly a quarter of Budapest’s population was listed as being Jewish – so it should not surprise you that the city plays host to the largest synagogue in all of Europe. Hungarian Jews were, like their German counterparts, quite assimilated into the country’s fabric and spoke Hungarian rather than Yiddish or Ladino. This building, known as Dohány utcai zsinagóga (Dohany street Synagogue) or Nagy zsinagóga (Great Synagogue), was constructed in the middle of the 1800s in the Moorish revival style and was intended as a centre of Neolog Judaism, a more liberal sect of Judaism that was popular among Hungarian Jews. The original building was first bombed by Hungarian ultra-nationalists during the German occupation and then used by the Nazis as a communication centre, but it was restored to its original exterior and use in 1991. The compound includes the house in which Theodore Herzl, the founder of Zionism, was born – so you can imagine that the security plan for the site, which includes metal detectors, is quite detailed. The exterior also includes various Renaissance and Gothic elements, while the interior has several murals and also an ark containing the religious scrolls of various other synagogues destroyed during the Holocaust. The Synagogue is also the site of the Jewish Museum and a Cemetary, as well as the Raul Wallenberg Memorial Park. Tickets run about $11 and include a tour and admission to the museum – try to plan ahead of time, since the tours are unilingual and you don’t want to get stuck with one conducted in a language you don’t understand.

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  • ophiro's Profile Photo

    Dohany synagogue - Raul Wallenberg memorial park

    by ophiro Written Jul 20, 2008

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    The Raul Wallenberg Holocaust Memorial is located in the backyard of the Dohany synagogue.

    The memorial is to remember the 400000 hungarian-jews that were killed during the war by Arrow Cross and Nazis.

    The memorial is a weeping willow tree made by the artist Imre Varga.
    On the leaves of the tree you will see names of people who died.

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  • ophiro's Profile Photo

    Dohany synagogue

    by ophiro Written Jul 20, 2008

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    The interior of the synagogue is one of the most beautiful synagogue's i've seen.

    Very beautiful , with 1500 seats for men and 1500 seats for women , some torah scrolls that they took from other synagogues that were destroyed in the holocaust.

    btw - during the war almost 20000 jewish people were inside the synagogue as refugees but 7000 died during the cold winter.
    Some of them are buried outside on the cemetery.

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  • ophiro's Profile Photo

    Dohany Synagogue

    by ophiro Updated Jul 20, 2008

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    The Dohany street synagogue (Dohany utcai Zsinagoga/Nagy Zsinagoga in Hungarian) is an impressive building , the largest synagogue in Europe and one of the largest in the world.

    The synagogue was built between 1854 and 1859 in a moorish revival style.

    Beside the synagogue you will see also a museum with jewish relics , Raul Wallenberg's Holocaust Memorial , jewish cemetery.

    The synagogue's interior is breathtaking.

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  • muratkorman's Profile Photo

    Biggest in Europe

    by muratkorman Written Oct 11, 2007

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    This is the biggest Synagogue in Europe and it is located in jewish district of Budapest. There is a tree of life in the garden dedicated to victims of jewish genocide. The building is visited by many tourists and there is entrance fee applied.

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    Great Synagogue

    by monkeytrousers Written Jul 24, 2007

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    Great Synagogue
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    The great synagogue lives up to its name as its the second largest in the world. Inside you can walk around the synagogue, visit a musuem of Jewish heritage and customs containing lots of related artefacts and items as well as an exhibit on the Holocaust. There is a also a memorial garden with a tree upon which names of the jewish people who died during the Holocaust are inscribed.

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  • rexvaughan's Profile Photo

    Europe's Largest Synagogue

    by rexvaughan Updated Feb 27, 2007

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    The Tree of Life
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    For centuries Budapest has been an important center for Jewish life, culture and commerce with indications that there were Jewish settlers in Buda in the 12th C and in Pest by the early 15th if not earlier. This city is also the birthplace of two of the leaders of the Zionist movement, Max Nordau and Theodor Hertzl.
    Sadly the story of the Jews in Budapest is a familiar one involving isolation and persecution at best and attempted extinction at worst. Through the middle ages they were expelled several times. Closer to our time, is said that 600,000 Hungarian Jews were killed in the Holocaust. There are about 80,000 Jews in Budapest today with 26 active synagogues in the city
    One of the best places to gain some understanding and appreciation for this heritage is at the Great Synagogue and its Jewish Museum. The Synagogue was build in the mid 19th C which appears to have been a prosperous and peaceful time for the Jews of Budapest. Interestingly enough the synagogue is designed like a church (basilica to be exact) so that when you go in it feels like a church except the symbols are different. It is said they wanted to feel more integrated into the community so this was done purposefully. It is a large edifice, seating 3000 and is second largest in the world after Temple Israel in New York. During WWII it is said that the Nazis used the building for some of their Holocaust activities and that Eichmann had an office here which I find ironic but repulsive. There are mass graves of thousands of vitims in the courtyard and the famous “Tree of Life” which marks the site. Each leaf has inscribed on it the name of one of the victims.

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  • sinisar's Profile Photo

    Dohány utcai Zsinagóga/Nagy Zsinagóga

    by sinisar Written Dec 14, 2006

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    29. IV 2006. 16:47

    Dohány utcai Zsinagóga/Nagy Zsinagóga in Budapest is the largest synagogue in Europe and the second largest in the world, after the Temple Emanu-El in New York City. It seats 3,000 people and is a centre of Neolog Judaism. The synagogue is 75m long and 27m wide and was built between 1854 and 1859 in the Moorish style, based chiefly on Muslim models from North Africa and Spain according to a plan by Ludwig Förster, with interior design partly by Frigyes Feszl.

    www.wikipedia.com

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  • nicolaitan's Profile Photo

    The Great Synagogue Interior ( 5 photos )

    by nicolaitan Written Dec 9, 2006

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    Spectacular, opulent - words can not do justice to the sanctuary of the Great Synagogue. Designed by Frigyes Fresl, the walls are covered with gold ornamental designs. The womens' galleries are supported by heavily decorated poles. The huge ark at the east end with its beautiful blue and gold filigreed dome contains many Torahs saved from synagogues destroyed elsewhere by the Nazis. The massive organ built in the mid 1800s has drawn great artists most notably Franz Liszt. Both it and an area for a choir are located behind the ark. The whole room is naturally illuminated through arched and round stained glass windows as well as by large ornate chandeliers. Sitting in the polished dark wooden benches, the visitor is compelled to search every corner for the beauty within this room.

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  • nicolaitan's Profile Photo

    The Great Synagogue ( 4 photos )

    by nicolaitan Updated Dec 9, 2006

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    Jews first settled in the Budapest region in the 11th Century and as in many European nations passed through periods of ascendancy alternating with years of persecution and even expulsion. After the anti-Semitic years of Empress Maria Theresa, Jewish prosperity reached a new peak under the friendly rule of Emporer Joseph II. As a reflection of their new-found success, the Reformed (Neolog) Jewish community of Pest undertook to build this massive synagogue, second largest in the world after New York's Temple Emanu-el, with room for 3000 worshippers, to the plans of a Viennese architect Ludwig Foerster. It would be enlarged in 1931. The square in front honors Zionist Theodore Herzl, who had his bar mitzvah here.

    During WWII, the Nazis occupied the building as a radio center and stable. Adolf Eichmann had offices here. It was used as a concentration point for transport of Jews to the extermination camps, and over 2000 Jews died here from exposure and starvation near the end of the war. Damage was heavy, both by Nazis and their allies the Arrow Cross party, and by the attacking allied forces. After the end of Communist rule during which the building fell into serious disrepair, funding for rehabilitation came largely from the US, much from Hungarian American actor Tony Curtis and from Estee Lauder. The three year reconstruction ended in 1996 with the synagogue restored to its earlier glory.

    The ornate west facade is almost Moorish in appearance, with long arched windows and carved stone with gold ornaments and domes on the windows. A large stained glass rose window overlooks the main door. The exterior brickwork echoes the colors of Budapest - yellow and red. The flanking towers are almost 50 feet high with gold ornaments on green onion domes. Arriving from the Astoria metro stop and rounding the corner, the sight of this building is truly breathtaking.

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  • mikarov99's Profile Photo

    The Budapest Great Synagoge

    by mikarov99 Updated Nov 25, 2006

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    This is some most intersting buildings of budapest has a moorish style whit two tower whit a form of bulb, was proyected by Ludwig Forster. Unfortunaly was not enter to Building i was arrived when was closed the synagoge.

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