Thermal Baths, Budapest

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  • Thermal Baths
    by mallyak
  • Thermal Baths
    by mallyak
  • Thermal Baths
    by mallyak
  • janika's Profile Photo

    Turkish and thermal baths

    by janika Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Very old Turkish bath from outside

    You have to go to one of the Turkish or thermal baths. There are many thermal baths in Budapest and there are even more outside of Budapest. The best ones are:

    Kiraly Furdo
    Rudas Furdo
    Gellert Furdo
    Szechenyi Furdo
    Lukacs Furdo
    Palatinusz
    Komjadi uszoda

    Order a body massage and pedicure for your feet. It's affordable and the thermal bath will do you good. Many people from all over the world go to Budapest for only this reason.
    Some of these baths were built by the Otoman / Turkish empire hundreds of years ago and even the ones not built by the turks are very old .

    The little pools inside them have signs indicating the water temperture in each one. It ranges from freezing cold to very hot. This water smells funny but you can get used to it. It heals your nervous system, your skin, your lungs and many other illnesses.
    .

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  • mallyak's Profile Photo

    Turkish bath

    by mallyak Updated Dec 12, 2010

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    Budapest is fortunate to have some of the world's finest
    Turkish baths. Not only do the baths boast original
    Ottoman architecture (consisting of wonderful
    octagonal pools, cupolas and colored glass windows)
    but offer a unique - and sometimes hedonistic - bathing
    experience. And while some, such as the Széchenyi
    Gyógyfürdõ are more recent, cheap entry prices and
    expert masseurs - who happily rearrange your limbs
    and muscles in ways that you thought (up until now)
    were impossible - are common to all!

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  • georeiser's Profile Photo

    Thermal baths of Budapest

    by georeiser Written Jun 23, 2009

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    Szechenyi Furdo, Thermal baths of Budapest

    Széchenyi Fürdo is the biggest in thermal bath in Europe. It's build in 1909, and rebuilt in 1927. The thermal water of Szechenyi Bath containing sodium, calcium, magnesium and sulphates, which is good to cure rheumatical diseases. Strange to see a public bath in a majestic building like this. It looks like a castle.

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    Inside the Széchenyi Thermal Baths-the lobby

    by 1courage Written Apr 17, 2008

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    The cupola
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    The lobby of the Széchenyi baths is quite spectacular. It`s a not really big but richly decorated cupola room. To be noticed the nice mosaics on the cupola and also a very strange statue wich I really don`t know, what represents.
    You can buy your ticket here. If you don`t have any paper released by the social insurance, you must pay the entire entrance fee wich is about 2200-2400 HUF (8,70-9,50 EUR). But if you abbandon the facility in less than 3 hours, a machine at the exit gives you back a percentage of the admittance fee.
    Of course you must pay an extra charge for the other services like for example the different kinds of massages.

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  • Gelert Baths at the Side of the Gelert Hotel.

    by blint Updated Dec 26, 2007

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    Gelert hotel thermal baths

    Gelert baths are the oldest and most famous baths. The temperature of the water is roughly 44ºc. They have MANY different kinds of pools and activities. Including a private bath just for two, the communal swimming pool or thermal mineral bath!

    Men and Women used to be separated. When I went a couple of years ago this had changed. Be careful, this still may to be true for other thermal baths in Budapest.

    Another point to remember is that you must wear a swimming hat in the pools! If you don't want to wear the pastic bag type thing they give you: bring your own.

    You can find many others:

    All over the city, but mostly in central areas. Look for details at the homepage of Budapest Medicinal Spas & Thermal Springs Co.

    P.S. Remember if you forget your swim suit you can hire them from the Gelert pools! You have to put a deposit down which you get back upon returning the swim suit.

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    Rudas Furdo

    by muratkorman Written Oct 31, 2007

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    Main pool
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    The history of this thermal bath goes back to 1550. It was built by the order of Turkish Sokullu Mehmet Pasa. It is a typical Turkish bath with the octogonal dome. It has been renovated in 2006 and now the interiors look much better than before. The main pool is surrounded by smaller pools having different water temperatures. There is also sauna and steam bath available. My favorite part is the resting room with the comfortable coaches. After spending some time in the pools and sauna, you feel really light and can even fall asleep there.

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  • Ewingjr98's Profile Photo

    Budapest's Thermal Baths

    by Ewingjr98 Updated Oct 17, 2007

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    Me! Jan 2006...water's warm, even in Winter
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    Gellert Baths, Kiraly Baths, Rudas Baths, and Szechenyi Baths are some of the most famous Turkish baths in the city. These pools typically offer a large main pool, plus numerous smaller pools with varying temperatures along with talented masseuses. The Gellert Baths are located in the famous Gellert Hotel at the bottom of Gellert Hill near the Cave Church and are open to hotel guests as well as the general public. Kiraly Baths date back to 1570 and sport a gay clientèle. Rudas Baths are located at Döbrentei tér and are the oldest baths in the city. Szechenyi Baths, in City Park, are perhaps the busiest baths in the city and claim a variety of patrons from old men to young children.

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  • leffe3's Profile Photo

    Széchenyi Baths

    by leffe3 Updated May 4, 2007

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    Recently renovated (in part), Széchenyi is the largest medicinal bath complex in Europe. And what an experience - right from first sight, as you arrive at this magnificently over-the-top wedding cake of a building with its ornate excesses, domes etc.

    It's a fantastic experience. There's three outdoor pools in the courtyard (wonderful backdrop of the bath-house), one of which is thermal (and heated) but where's there's also fountains to swim under, moving water corridors, chess boards in the pool (all celebrating the curative aspects of water) - and then there's the medicinal baths themselves - saunas of different temps, steam rooms, plunge pools etc... They can smell a bit strong (sulphur) at times, and the extreme wet/damp has got to the infrastructure making them look a bit neglected etc, (but then with all that water and damp...) but the key point of such baths is not the state of the ceiling - the water is changed, the medicinal rooms are cleaned etc.

    It's a highlight of a trip to Budapest - and it's also cheap and throughout its extensive opening times, is mixed for male and female use. Open 6am - 7pm, Monday-Sunday (May-September - closes at 5pm at weekends the rest of the year).

    And we were certainly glad of the heated outdoor pool - in spite of the sunshine, it was freezing and its Easter in April. A few minutes after these photos were taken it began to snow!! It was a wonderful moment - sitting in the heated pool with snowflakes melting all around you.

    Part of City Park, it can be reached by the metro at Hõsök tere (and a short walk across the square and park) or the baths' metro itself - Széchneyi fürdõ

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    The Széchenyi Baths

    by 1courage Updated Oct 29, 2006

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    The main facade & the 3 cupolas of the baths
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    The Széchenyi Fürdő is the biggest thermal complex, not only in Hungary but in Europe.
    Originally it wasn`t so big. It was constructed between 1909 and 1913. It soon became so popular that it needed to be expanded. The newer parts of the thermal facility were constructed in 1927, in the same, neobaroque style like the older parts. The thermal water of Szechenyi Bath containing sodium, calcium-magnesium-hydrocarbonate and sulphates, with significant fluoride and metaboric acid contents, is ideal to cure rheumatical diseases.

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  • JohnniOmani's Profile Photo

    Baths

    by JohnniOmani Updated Jul 4, 2006

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    The Baths is Budapest were absolutely hilarious! It is quite bizarre to go to the baths and expecting an image of silence and relaxtion but in reality it is loaded with old men playing chess half naked! It is a fun experience it is a great way to meet the locals who are extremely friendly! I loved it and I cant wait to go back to relax and chat again!

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  • lesaandbill's Profile Photo

    Thermal Batch

    by lesaandbill Written May 6, 2006

    What an experience. If you're vain...don't go. You have to wear a public bathing suit...and they're hideous...and compared to other thermal baths around the world...it is not impressive...but a great experience....none the less.

    I looked like a complete idiot in the swimsuit provided...but I just tromped out to the baths..and enjoyed the company.

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  • bratsch's Profile Photo

    Turkish baths from 1566

    by bratsch Written Mar 18, 2006

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    Travellers to Budapest might enjoy a turkish bath at the newly renovated Rudas baths. Reopened in December, 2005 the thermal baths built in 1566 are for the first time open to women as well. Currently two half-days per week are ladies only (I think it’s Tuesday and Thursday but better check!). Friday and Saturday nights from 10PM to 4AM the baths go co-ed (bathing suits required). The rest of the time it’s men only. The entrance fee is HUF2000 (about 10 dollars) which includes a changing cabin. Towels are provided. The central octagonal basin is at 36° C. Four smaller baths in the corners have water at 28, 30, 33, and 42 degrees. There are steam rooms and saunas and massages can be had for an additional fee. On the other side of the complex is a 19th century swimming pool. All the installations are indoors. My friends and I thoroughly enjoyed our experience there and, while the ticket booths and turnstiles at the entrance are daunting, the staff were mainly accommodating.

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  • Palatinus Open-Air Bath - History of the Bath

    by frankyboy5 Written Mar 10, 2006

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    The Open-Air Bath, located on the Margit island, in a nature conservation area, was opened as a beach on the bank of the Danube in 1919. With the construction of the large pool it was transformed in 1921 into an open-air bath.
    Owing to its high popularity it had to be expanded, therefore an architectural project tender was launched in 1937, as a result of which the plans composed by Istvan Januky were accepted. The current installation was completed o?n the basis of these plans. Its pools are supplied by the thermal springs of the Margit Island. In the second half of the 1980s, a five-path chute was built. The open-air bath, also equipped with a wave-bath pool, allocated in a park area, is visited by many foreign guests, in addition to the Hungarian ones. There are sports grounds and playgrounds for children, offering excellent distraction facilities for all age groups. In 2002 the pools of the Open-Air Bath were modernised, they were equipped with water filtering and revolving devices. The swimming pool was shaped into three sections: swimming pool, fancy pool and beach pool. Of these, the fancy pool is expecting visitors with neck shower, effervescence generator and whirling corridor.

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    Roman Baths

    by Markyreid Written Mar 7, 2006

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    Roman Baths

    After a day riding in heavy rain and seeing very little, we were totally revived by the Roman Baths. For us, Budapest will be remembered for its warm, inviting baths. We rode for about 40 minutes in the rain looking for them, but it was certainly worth it. The price was reasonable too, costing about 6 euros each, although you have to pay for a full day and then you can get a refund if you are only there for two hours. (so you will need more money then 6 euros each)
    There are several different baths, 3 outside and 4 or 5 inside, all of different temperatures. There are fountains for massages and in built chess boards to play while sitting in the water, although it is hard to get a seat at these games. The locals took it very seriously.

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    Kiraly Turkish Baths

    by argentia Written Jul 24, 2005

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    Gellert Hotel and Thermal Baths

    A traditional turkish bath with a large swimming pool, 3 thermal baths, and 2 saunas. It's a very relaxing way to spend an afternoon. Entrance is 1000 forints, and the baths are not coed. Call or check the internet to see which are men- or women-only days. Bathing suits are optional though, no matter what the sign says!

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