Geysir Things to Do

  • October 2013.
    October 2013.
    by Regina1965
  • November 2013
    November 2013
    by Regina1965
  • Things to Do
    by Regina1965

Most Recent Things to Do in Geysir

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    Little Geysir - litli Geysir.

    by Regina1965 Updated Nov 27, 2013

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    There are several small hot springs in the Geysir area, especially in the south end of the Geysir area. One of them is called Little Geysir (litli Geysir) and another one Smiður (the smith).

    Little Geysir is a small hole with bubbling water and Smiður is also always churning and bubbling. Sometimes soap is added to Smiður and it will spout up to 7 meters.

    Soap has been frequently used to force the hot springs to spout - cannot be very environmently friendly though?

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    Konungshver hot spring.

    by Regina1965 Updated Nov 27, 2013

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    I by Konungshver in 2008.
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    One of the hot springs in the Geysir area is called Konungshver or The King´s hot spring or The Royal hot spring. It is in the northwest end of the Geysir area above Geysir. It is named after the Danish king Christian IX, who visited Geysir in 1874 and was back then the king of Iceland.

    Its shaft is closed by stones which block it, so it doesn´t spout.

    If you look at the photos I have taken there through the years you will notice how the hot spring changes in colour.

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    Geysir - the original one.

    by Regina1965 Updated Oct 18, 2013

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    Standing way too close to Geysir in 2010.
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    Geysir itself, which is the best known geysir in the world and gives its name to all the other geysirs, started spouting after a big eartquake, Suðurlandsskjálftinn, in the 13th century. Geysir stopped erupting in 1915, but it must have been a sight to see as it went about 60 metres into the air, but Strokkur, which is now spouting with a regular interval, is much smaller. Icelanders tried reviving Geysir by throwing soap into it and forced an eruption and from time to time it erupted. Then on 17th of June 2000 (our National day) we had a big earthquake (6,3 on Richter) and Geysir started erupting again, but much less frequently than Strokkur. But through the centuries Geysir has had its ups and downs.

    Never ever go within the boundaries of Geysir itself as it erupts about 3-5 times per day about 10 metres in the air. At least that is what it did after the earthquake, I don´t have exact info about if it is still doing it. Before it erupts thuds can be heard. I have seen people walking straight up to Geysir and looking into it!! This is extremely dangerous and in December 2008 a British couple was in grave danger and had to run away from Geysir as it was erupting. By chance an Icelandic tourist-guide was passing by and could warn them in the nick of time. I have visited the Geysir area many many times and never seen Geysir spout.

    Geysir has now stopped sprouting completely and has been fenched off, so one can walk closer up to it.

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    Take a photo with a troll.

    by Regina1965 Updated Oct 18, 2013

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    I by the troll in 2010.
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    Above the hotel at Geysir there is a troll - not an elf, as they look like humans - but a big troll :)

    We Icelanders not only believe in the existance of elves, we also believe in trolls. But that is a different kind of belief. Because we know that the elves are alive now, but the trolls we know of are all petrified as they didn't make it home before sunrise. So they are kind of in the past, Icelanders don't think they will encounter a big troll while travelling in Iceland - just the petrified ones. But there are so many tales in Iceland of encounters with the trolls - maybe they are still alive? And let´s not forget that they eat humans!

    So if you want a photo with a troll this is the place. JumpingNorman got his photo taken with the troll when he visited Iceland and so did I ;) And he merged our photos together - I love it, thanks Norman :)

    I visited the troll again in May and July 2013 with VT-members, and then a big chair had been placed by the troll.

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    The Great Geysir

    by travelfrosch Updated Jun 2, 2013

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    Geysir erupts (a bit)...
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    The marquis draw is, of course, the Great Geysir. Unfortunately, Geysir stopped erupting regularly quite a few years ago. In the past couple of years, it has started erupting again, roughly once or twice a day, but the eruptions are nowhere near as impressive as in the past. The steaming pool is still quite a sight, though.

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    Litli Geysir

    by travelfrosch Updated Jun 2, 2013

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    Next along the path is the "Little Geysir." While nowhere near as impressive as its "big brother," the little guy will simmer and sputter, and occasionally spurt out a fountain a few feet in the air. A worthwhile diversion while waiting for one of the bigger guys to erupt.

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    Strokkur Ace

    by travelfrosch Updated Jun 2, 2013

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    Thar she blows!
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    Nowadays, the big draw is the Strokkur (or the Churn). It erupts quite regularly -- once every few minutes. The streams of water have been known to go as high as 30 meters (100 feet) in the air, but they don't always. Keep an eye on the pool: you will see it "breathe" right before an eruption, with the water dome pressing up and down. Finally, the pool bulges upward and a stream of water and steam breaks out. One final note: sometimes, you'll get a small eruption. After one of these, you will quite often get a much larger eruption a few seconds later -- be sure to keep your camera ready! :)

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    Konungshver

    by travelfrosch Updated Jun 2, 2013

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    Am I blue?
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    Konungshver, or the king's hot spring, normally is just that -- a hot spring. It releases steam from time to time, and occasionally erupts, but it is normally known for its blue hue. Again, inviting as it may appear, don't even think about touching the water, unless you enjoy getting severely scalded.

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    Visit Gullfoss

    by travelfrosch Updated Jun 2, 2013

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    I'm impressed...

    If you're in a mood for a fairly long walk, you can make your way by foot from Geysir to the spectacular waterfall Gullfoss. Walk on Route 35 northward towards Kjölur for about 10 km (6 miles), and you will come upon the site, just as route 35 becomes Route F35 ("F" denotes four-wheel-drive vehicles only). All I can say is, be sure your camera batteries are fully charged.

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    Look at the "Little Guys"

    by travelfrosch Updated Jun 2, 2013

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    A steamy spectacle
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    The first things you'll see when you cross the road from the hotel or parking lot is a series of smaller, steaming pots. This area is known as Þykkuhverir, or "viscous hot springs." Some of these are artificially capped, presumably to provide steam to the complex. You'll notice a slight odor of rotten eggs from the sulfur mixed in with the emitting steam. Beware: don't touch the pots, no matter how innocent they look. They are extremely hot.

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  • jmpncsu's Profile Photo

    Geysir

    by jmpncsu Written Jan 11, 2013
    Strokkur Erupting
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    Geysir is one of the main attractions on the popular Golden Circle route. We visited Geysir on our Golden Circle tour with Iceland Guided Tours. Geysir, from which the word geyser is derived, can be considered the "original" geyser. It used to erupt quite powerfully, but is no longer active. It might erupt occasionally, but didn't erupt when we visited. Nearby, however, is Strokkur, another geyser that erupts every couple of minutes. This one will put on quite a show for visitors and you don't have to be terribly patient to wait for it. But don't get too close (past the barriers around the geysers and hot springs) as the water is very hot - 80 to 100°C. Besides Geysir and Strokkur, there are several other smaller hot springs and geysers. Konungshver is a cool hot spring near Geysir. It doesn't erupt but is near boiling hot. A trail behind Konungshver leads up to the top of Laugafell Mountain. This is a great place to get a view of the entire Geysir area and watch Strokkur erupt. Across the street from Geysir is a hotel with a restaurant and gift shop as well as restrooms.

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    Gentle beasts

    by Assenczo Updated Oct 8, 2012
    Blond, of course!
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    Icelandic horses are all over the place but the most of them must be in Southern Iceland where the best grazing is. These beautiful creatures can be seen on your Golden (Moss) Triangle Tour with great ease. In case of personal control of the vehicle one can stop, admire and photograph these ancient animals which would give you a very curious look in return. Shooting cowboy style, on the move, can also be fruitful and a blurry image otherwise might be a disappointment but in the circumstances it could be interpreted as “hot and steamy”. Apparently, these horses are the original ones brought by the Vikings. Today no breeding with outsiders is aloud. As if to compensate this handicap there is abundant “inbreeding” which might not be ideal gene-wise but certainly keeps the features unblemished. A combo trip including Iceland and Norway would provide ample testimony to this claim.

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  • Regina1965's Profile Photo

    Blesi - hot-spring.

    by Regina1965 Updated Oct 12, 2011

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    Blesi.
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    Blesi hot spring is one of the hot springs on the Geysir area. It doesn´t spout at the moment, I have actually never seen it spout, but I love the absolutely fabulous azure colour of this hot spring. You can see the same azure colour at The Blue lagoon as it comes from dissolved silica. And I have seen this colour as well at Leirhnjúkar at Mývatn. Blesi (which is a common name for a horse here in Iceland) actually consists of 2 hot springs. And the temperature in Blesi is ca 40 degrees C, so in the early days it was used for bathing and washing of clothes.

    What I have seen and irritates me a lot is that people (mostly my countrymen) throw coins into the hot spring... what is that about? By the entrance of the Geysir area people are urged not to leave garbage in this area and not to throw coins into the hot springs! I would say that it is common sense not to do this... There is one fissure at Þingvellir national park where it is allowed to throw coins in and make a wish "Peningagjá", but that doesn´t mean that it can be done where ever.

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    Hiking the mountain above the Geysir area.

    by Regina1965 Updated Oct 12, 2011

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    For an excellent view of the Geysir area a short hike up Mt. Laugafell is recommended. Start from Konungshver hot spring and you will pass a panorama disk - and cross a fence with steps. It is not a difficult hike and from up there is an excellent view.

    Not everybody hikes up on this hill, but a reasonable amount of tourists go there. On the other side of the hill is a valley.

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    Experience a geyser up close

    by fred98115 Updated May 7, 2011
    Onlookers view the geyser preparing to erupt
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    This is a geyser that goes off every seven minutes or so, and you can be really close. Therefore, you can closely observe all of the stages of an eruption. Also, it generally is not surrounded by "Old Faithful" like crowds. It is not a small geyser which also makes it pleasant to view and photograph.

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