Bunratty Things to Do

  • The castle from the yard of a more humble dwelling
    The castle from the yard of a more...
    by Flying.Scotsman
  • The banqueting hall
    The banqueting hall
    by Flying.Scotsman
  • Brightly coloured thatched cottagePeat fuelled fir
    Brightly coloured thatched cottagePeat...
    by Flying.Scotsman

Most Recent Things to Do in Bunratty

  • Flying.Scotsman's Profile Photo

    Bunratty Folk Park (1)

    by Flying.Scotsman Written Mar 2, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Brightly coloured thatched cottagePeat fuelled fir
    4 more images

    Bunratty Folk Park is an enjoyable way to see how the more ordinary people lived in 19th century Ireland. The 26 acre park includes small cottages with peat fires burning, farmhouses, a watermill, a village street, and a church. I have spread the photos over 2 reviews to give a better idea of the buildings and agricultural impliments on display. So have a look at Bunratty Folk Park (2) and also Bunratty Castle.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits
    • Photography

    Was this review helpful?

  • Flying.Scotsman's Profile Photo

    Bunratty Castle and Folk Park

    by Flying.Scotsman Written Mar 2, 2014
    The castle from the yard of a more humble dwelling
    3 more images

    Located between Shannon Airport and Limerick, this is a perfect place to spend a day learning about life in 19th century in Ireland. The castle itself dates from the early 15th century and has a collection of paintings, tapestries and furnishings. There is an amazing banqueting hall in the castle. On the grounds there is a pub and a tearoom for snacks and meals. The photographs in this section are of the castle. Photograhs and information about the folk park are in 2 other “Things to do” reviews.

    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • mvtouring's Profile Photo

    The Village Street

    by mvtouring Written Feb 8, 2013
    3 more images

    The Village Street denotes village life in 19th century Ireland. Fairs and markets at the Village gave the farmers and the rural craftsmen an opportunity of selling their products for cash, while shops provided for the rural dwellers needs. In the early 18th century the country people provided for most of their own needs in food, clothing and supplies and bought only luxuries such as sugar, salt, tea ….The village houses and shops have been chosen from many different areas, to form a collection of typical of 19th century urban Irish buildings.

    Visit the School, Doctor’s house, Pawnbrokers, Pub, Drapery, Printworks, Grocery, Hardware shop, Pottery and a Post Office.

    Was this review helpful?

  • mvtouring's Profile Photo

    Shannon Heritage Bunratty Castle & Folk Park

    by mvtouring Written Feb 8, 2013
    3 more images

    Bunratty Folk Park is a living reconstruction of the homes and environment of Ireland of over a century ago. Rural farmhouses, village shops and streets are recreated and furnished as they would have appeared at that time.

    In the Folk Park there is an extensive array of vernacular buildings; indicative of all of the social strata, from the poorest one roomed dwelling to Bunratty House a fine example of a Georgian residence for the gentry (built 1804 home of the Studdarts, the last family to occupy Bunratty Castle).

    Was this review helpful?

  • TheaIren's Profile Photo

    Inside the castle - II

    by TheaIren Updated Apr 24, 2011
    View from above to the Great Hall
    4 more images

    There is so much to explore inside the castle. Now, when I'm looking the plan of the castle I managed to miss South Solar...described what comprised the guests apartments....and the dungeon...because there was just too many people around there.

    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Museum Visits
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • TheaIren's Profile Photo

    Inside the castle - I

    by TheaIren Written Apr 24, 2011
    Carved chair in The Main Guard
    4 more images

    The stairs are very narrow and difficult to climb when so many tourists doing the same up and down but still it was an interesting experience.

    I like details but there was not allowed to take pictures inside the castle with flash and my digital camera is just a regular "soapbox" so, I managed to take only some OK quality pics and some good quality pics because at first I did'nt noticed that restriction sign.

    As it mentioned before 15th and 16th century furnishing and interrior design is used...it was like walking around antique shop...or rather going back in time...It would have been even greater experience when visiting it alone...if no other people ( tourists ) inside you would easely forgot the year 2011.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Museum Visits
    • Castles and Palaces

    Was this review helpful?

  • TheaIren's Profile Photo

    Bunratty Castle

    by TheaIren Updated Apr 24, 2011
    Nice - is'nt it?
    2 more images

    The present castle, last of a series on the same site was built around 1425. During the 16th and 17th centuries it was an important stronghold of the O'Briens kings and later earls of Thomond or North Munster. It is furnished with mainly 15th and 16th century furnishings in the style of the period of the Great Earl. The main block has three floors, each consisting of a single great room, or hall. The four towers have a six stories each. The castle is entered by a drawbridge to the Main Guard. (Text from leaflet).

    Before I visited Bunratty I past it by via bus to Limerick. It was an impressive view from bus window and I thought by myself that I will come to take a closer look. I never knew that there was whole Open Air Museum around it. It was a great and nice surprise when I started to look up more material about this castle from the internet before I decided to come. When finally in here...yes...it is tourist trap but it sure is a nice one and worth a visit.

    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Museum Visits
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • TheaIren's Profile Photo

    Cashen Fisherman's House

    by TheaIren Written Apr 24, 2011
    Cashen Fisherman House
    4 more images

    A simple two-bedroomed home of a North Kerry salmon fisherman. Much of a timber would have salvaged from the sea. The floor is od rammed clay.

    I liked the colour of the house and smell of smoke inside. Most of the Irish traditional houses have open fireplace...

    Nice details around the house, wanted to photograph everything...

    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • TheaIren's Profile Photo

    Blacksmiths Forge

    by TheaIren Written Apr 24, 2011
    Blacksmiths forge from the distance
    1 more image

    The blacksmith made tools for many other craftworkers and tradesman. The hand operated bellows kept the fire blazing. He was one of the most important and recpected members of the community.
    (Description taken from the leaflet).

    Well taking look inside, it felt abandoned. But if you have a good imagination (luckily I have one) you can imagine a warm and romantic image of a well built man in a work, forging a magic sword ;-)

    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Museum Visits
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • TheaIren's Profile Photo

    Loop Head House

    by TheaIren Updated Apr 24, 2011
    Loop Head House
    2 more images

    The house of a fishing-farming family in West Clare. The thatch is roped down to protect it against the Atlantic gales. ( This was written in a leaflet ).

    What I remember of that house was open fireplace inside and that I liked how two buildings make up a perfect match. And I remeber to be irritated as I tried to took a picture in a way that other people wont be in them...it took a while as there are a lot of tourists...like myself ;-).

    I really felt myself as Japanese tourist ( it is not insult ) in there because I wanted to photograph everything.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits
    • Castles and Palaces

    Was this review helpful?

  • DEBBBEDB's Profile Photo

    Baking Apple Pies

    by DEBBBEDB Updated Jul 24, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Waterwheel
    4 more images

    Went into Bunratty castle and folk park (sort of a small Williamsburg). We toured the castle first as the day was a little rainy.

    Again, our son looked for toilets - we found one inside and evidence of more from the outside. This castle was much newer than Trim. It was built in the 15th century. The folk park was nice. Our son enjoyed watching them make apple pies (we probably watched for 30 minutes). He also enjoyed the water wheel. The man there gave him some wheat seeds for the ducks.

    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Family Travel
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • grandmaR's Profile Photo

    Bunratty Castle

    by grandmaR Updated Jul 1, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Great Hall
    4 more images

    When we finally decided to go out to the Castle and Folk Park because the rain wasn't going to stop and it wasn't raining very hard, we went to the Folk part first because the lady at the entrance said that there were two coach (bus) loads of tourists in there.

    Finally we cut short our park visit so as to have time for the castle, we went in the exit by mistake and went up the down staircase (photo 3). When we got to the Great Hall, I sat down and sent my grandson up the stairs to the four towers (photo 5) and then came down the entrance stairs. We didn't see the dungeons. I thought we would see them when we came back for the banquet but we went to Knappogue instead.

    There were tapestries and artifacts from various eras in the castle's history (none or few are belonging to the castle).

    Open Year Round (Closed Good Friday & Dec 24th.,25th.,26th)

    Jan, Feb, Mar, Nov, Dec
    9.30 - 17.30 (Last Admission to Folk Park 16.15)

    Apr, May, Sept, Oct
    9.00 - 17.30 (Last Admission to Folk Park 16.15)

    June – Aug
    9.00 – 18.00 (Last Admission to Folk Park 17.15)

    Last Admission to the Castle - 16.00 Year round

    Admission Prices - As per 01 April 2007-31 March 2008

    Adult: €14.00
    Child: €9.00

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces

    Was this review helpful?

  • grandmaR's Profile Photo

    Vertical and Horizontal Mills

    by grandmaR Updated Jul 1, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Vertical mill
    4 more images

    The park has both a vertical and a horizontal mill. The Vertical Mill is a classic stone example of a rural undershot watermill. Photos 2, 3 and 5 show the inside of the Vertical mill.

    Picture 4 shows the Horizontal Mill and the mill pond. This is a working corn mill based on findings of an excavation in Mashangla Co. Cork. This type of mill is described in detail in Irish Law texts of a 1000 years ago. Such mills were still in use up to the middle of this century. We didn't go in that mill.

    Additional photos are in one of the travelogues.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Museum Visits
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • grandmaR's Profile Photo

    Schoolhouse

    by grandmaR Written Jun 23, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Schoolmistress
    4 more images

    This school was originally built at Belvoir in East Clare in the early 19th Century. It is typical of the type of school that would have been in existence around the year 1900.

    The teacher role played and smacked her pointer down on the desk for emphasis. She also fed the fire in the fireplace with peat (photo 2).

    There was something written on the blackboard about hedgerow schools (photo 4) and a model of a hedgerow school (photo 5). I couldn't read all of it because part of it was erased. Apparently education (whether this was in religion or in Gaelic or was any kind of education at all) was illlegal for Irish Catholic. The Hedgerow schols were out in the fields in lean-tos under the Hedgerows where they could hide from the English.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • grandmaR's Profile Photo

    Hazelbrook House

    by grandmaR Written Jun 23, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Hazelbrook House
    4 more images

    This house which was originally built in 1898 and was the home of the Hughes Brothers who produced HB ice cream - a household name in Ireland. They started a dairy industry in the 1800’s.

    We ran out of time and only got to see this from the outside, but I understand that:

    Hazelbrook House offers the visitor the unique opportunity to learn about the evolution of Ice cream making from the domestic dairy to the modern day production plant. The House features the history of the industrious Hughes Brothers family.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Bunratty

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

113 travelers online now

Comments

Bunratty Things to Do

Reviews and photos of Bunratty things to do posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Bunratty sightseeing.

View all Bunratty hotels