The Burren, County Clare

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  • Ballyvaughan
    Ballyvaughan
    by MalenaN
  • Ballyalban Earthen Ring Fort
    Ballyalban Earthen Ring Fort
    by MalenaN
  • House with a double door in Ballyvaughan
    House with a double door in Ballyvaughan
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  • Cruefan's Profile Photo

    The Burren.. errie beauty

    by Cruefan Written Jun 3, 2005

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    The Burren

    I visited the Burren just after the Cliffs of Moher and it was a big contrast. The Burren is a very quiet place and I saw more sheep than people. The Burren is limestone that extends for miles and turns into moutains that border the ocean.

    We drove along the narrow roads I noticed that May is a great time to visit because wildflowers grown between the limestone rocks. It's something you have to experience to fully appreciate it.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip

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  • himalia11's Profile Photo

    Limestone landscape of the Burren

    by himalia11 Written Nov 7, 2004

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    Burren

    The Burren is a huge area of limestone rock. You may think that there’s only bare grey limestone, but you’ll also see there several plants, and even areas with lots of bushes. But it’s not so green like the rest of Ireland! It’s an amazing landscape and we found it very interesting to drive around there. I recommend you drive as well around the coast as inside the country. Especially the west coast of the Burren (R477 between Lisdoonvarna and Fanore) was great, with the sea on one side an the rocky limestone pavement on the other side. We also found the area around Carran very interesting, we just took some of the small streets. Get yourself the free “Burren at a glance” map so that you find your way out!

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  • hevbell's Profile Photo

    THE BURREN

    by hevbell Updated Nov 20, 2003

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    Poulnabrone Dolmen

    The Burren covers quite a bit of ground in Co Clare and Galway and the landscape is really unusual. Burren derives from the Irish for "rocky country" [Boireann*] and the area is covered in polished limestone that appeared after errosion of the thin top soil which started some 6000 years ago with the first farmers. Despite the lack of soil the area is well known for the enormous number of unusual plants that make use of what rich soil there is between the rocks.

    Related to:
    • Eco-Tourism
    • Road Trip

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  • Krumel's Profile Photo

    The Burren

    by Krumel Written Jun 28, 2003

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    Burren Landscape

    Ever wondered what it might look like on the moon? Go to the Burren in County Clare and you might get the idea. One of Cromwell's officers said about the area: "Not enough water to drown a man, no tree to hang a man and no soil to bury him".

    The Burren is a desert of limestone on the Atlantic coast formed in the ice age by receding glaciers. These left behind seeds of arctic, alpine and mediterranean plants behind which grow in the cracks and fissures. Do not collect them, though. All plants and wildlife are protected. Picking of flowers is an offence.

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  • chrissyalex's Profile Photo

    The Burren

    by chrissyalex Written Apr 26, 2003

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    The Burren

    The Burren is a very barren limestone plateau located in northwest county Clare. It is rather large and covers over a hundred square miles. It is a stark contrast to the lush green areas found in many other parts of Ireland. There are interesting Stone Age burial monuments in this region as well.
    Another very unique thing about this area is that in the spring ,both Arctic and Mediterranean wildflowers grow here side by side.

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  • A perfect base for trips around the Burren

    by sabsi Updated Nov 25, 2002

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Ballyvaughan

    From here you are everywhere quite quickly. If you go north you get to Galway, south you can go along the Co. Clare coast with stoney beaches and the Cliffs of Moher. You're only a few miles away from Aillwee Cave and hikes in the Burren.

    Ballyvaughan itself doesn't have any attraction but some nice bars and many B&Bs. Oh and the Spar supermarket at the main street sells delicious sandwiches!

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  • Have a look on the ground!

    by sabsi Updated Nov 25, 2002

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    Burren ground

    The combination of limestone (in the strangest shapes) and flowers in the Burren.....beautiful! The Burren got its name from the Irish word Boireann which means "rocky land". What a perfect name for this strange landscape!

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  • wadekorzan's Profile Photo

    The Burren Region, County Clare

    by wadekorzan Updated Sep 3, 2002
    The Burren, County Clare

    Drive through this spectacular region called The Burren. The limestone hills once an ancient seabed that was forced up by geological forces. Later, the hills were covered by soil and trees, but over time all that remains are the limestone outcrops. There are many good walks that can be done in this region, and there are many caves that are open to the pubic which can be explored.

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  • Deefstes's Profile Photo

    The Burren

    by Deefstes Written Aug 26, 2002

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    A very interesting landscape and home to the famous 'famine walls', The Burren would be the other big attraction in county Clare.

    You can't really miss it as it stretches all along the coast.

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