Fun things to do in Cork

  • Cork Harbour
    Cork Harbour
    by AusPinay
  • Upstairs at Blarney Castle
    Upstairs at Blarney Castle
    by Airpunk
  • The park (at least part of it)
    The park (at least part of it)
    by Airpunk

Most Viewed Things to Do in Cork

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    Cork is a great city for walking

    by littlesam1 Written May 26, 2011

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    Cork is not a large city, so its very open to walking. We walked everywhere we went in Cork. One beautiful walk we enjoyed was along the North Channel of the River Lee. This area was behind out guest house so it was easy to find and convenient for us. The river, the bridges, and the parks in this area are all very beautiful.

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  • Football/Soccer

    by fabio222 Updated Apr 4, 2011

    If you're interested in some sport then why not take a trip to Turners Cross Stadium, the home of Cork's professional football/soccer team, Cork City FC?

    The stadium is located at Turners Cross itself and is only a ten to twenty minute walk from the city centre.
    The stadium is now fully seated with a capacity of around 8,000 and it always generates an electric atmosphere with the "Shed End" section being extremely vocal in their support for the team and of course always humourous in that unique Cork way!

    Thankfully hooligansim is not a part of Irish soccer and so trips to the ground are great for familes with the club having a dedicated family section inside the stadium.

    The most special nights at the 'Cross are when European teams come over to play in the various European competitions. Teams such as Djurgardens, Slavia Prague, Torpedo Moscow, FC Nantes, FK Ekranas, Nijmegan, Malmo FF, Apollon Limassol and Red Star Belgrade are all examples of teams that have played at the stadium in the Intertoto Cup, UEFA Cup and Champions League.
    With Cork City as underdogs most of the time, they have performed admirably and have reached the quarter finals of the Intertoto Cup in 2004 (having beaten Malmo and Nijmegan before succumbing to FC Nantes, 1st round proper of the UEFA Cup (having beaten FK Ekranas and Djurgardens before being beaten by Slavia Prague in the 1st round proper) and also the 2nd qualifying round of the Champions League (beating Apollon Limassol before succumbing to Red Star Belgrade).

    The most special night on the stadium was undoubtably on November 19 2005 when Cork City won the eircom League Title having beaten Derry City two nil to clinch it on the final day of the season.

    Tickets are a maximum of €15 with concessions for children. It should also be noted that professional soccer in Ireland runs on a summer calender and not like the usual winter football season which England operates.

    For more information visit: www.corkcityfc.ie

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Adventure Travel
    • School Holidays

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  • Football/Soccer

    by fabio222 Updated Apr 4, 2011

    If you're interested in some sport then why not take a trip to Turners Cross Stadium, the home of Cork's professional football/soccer team, Cork City FC?

    The stadium is now fully seated with a capacity of around 8,000 and it always generates an electric atmosphere with the "Shed End" section being extremely vocal in their support for the team and of course always humourous in that unique Cork way!

    Thankfully hooligansim is not a part of Irish soccer and so trips to the ground are great for familes with the club having a dedicated family section inside the stadium.

    The most special nights at the 'Cross are when European teams come over to play in the various European competitions that Cork City have done particularly well in. Teams such as Djurgardens, Slavia Prague, Torpedo Moscow, FC Nantes, FK Ekranas, Nijmegan, Malmo FF, Apollon Limassol and Red Star Belgrade are all examples of teams that have played at the stadium in the Intertoto Cup, UEFA Cup and Champions League.
    With Cork City as underdogs most of the time, they have performed admirably and have reached the quarter finals of the Intertoto Cup in 2004 (having beaten Malmo and Nijmegan before succumbing to FC Nantes, 1st round proper of the UEFA Cup (having beaten FK Ekranas and Djurgardens before being beaten by Slavia Prague in the 1st round proper) and also the 2nd qualifying round of the Champions League (beating Apollon Limassol before succumbing to Red Star Belgrade).

    The most special night on the stadium was undoubtably on November 19 2005 when Cork City won the eircom League Title having beaten Derry City two nil to clinch it on the final day of the season.

    Tickets are a maximum of €15 with concessions for children. It should also be noted that professional soccer in Ireland runs on a summer calender and not like the usual winter football season which England operates.

    For more information visit: www.corkcityfc.ie

    Related to:
    • School Holidays
    • Adventure Travel
    • Family Travel

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    Day to Dublin

    by Waoife Updated Jul 22, 2010

    Dublin is doable as a day trip from Cork by train (the adult can be as low as €10 one way if you book online in advance and the trip is just under 3 hours each way).

    The best bet would be to get the 7.30 train from Cork which gets you into Dublin shortly after 10.00 and then spend the day in Dublin city (the train station is about 20 mins walk from Central Dublin or even quicker if you hop on the Luas (tram) just outside the main door)- the trains run hourly up to about 9.00 at night back to Cork.

    For information on train times and fares see www.irishrail.ie

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    Fota Wildlife Park

    by Waoife Updated Jul 22, 2010

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    Just outside Cork city, this is much better than your average zoo.

    The animals are not kept behind bars (well except for cheetahs that are well fenced in for pretty obious reasons!!) but are free to roam around - on their own islands in the lake for the monkeys, in a great big field for the giraffes, zebras & friends, and roaming the park for some of the smaller animals (small kangaroos (presume they're wallabies??), peacocks ...).

    You can see the animals up close (walking right by you on the pavement in some instances!) & because they have much more space they don't look as bored as the poor creatures in a regular zoo.

    Related to:
    • Safari
    • Zoo
    • Family Travel

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  • Lifetime Lab at Old Waterworks

    by swerver Written Jul 11, 2010

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    fantastic visitor centre where the kids had to solve questions based on the impressive exhibits in the main buiding,the kids were kept busy by the nice staff who bribed them with a trip to their playgroung if they got all the questions correct, the place is set up to promote sustainable living so the exhibits are based on water,waste and energy.Includeing time in the well maintained playground we spent 2 hours there, not bad for an entrance fee of 7 euro for the four of us.While i was getting a cup of coffee the girl serving was telling me that they get a lot of visits from school children and were getting ready for a wedding and a family fun day at the weekend.

    Related to:
    • Eco-Tourism
    • Museum Visits
    • Family Travel

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    Port of Cork, Cobh, Ireland

    by AusPinay Written May 23, 2010

    The Port of Cork is a vast area and is the second biggest port in the world after Port Jackson in Sydney Australia. It is the main port serving the South of Ireland, County Cork and Cork City. It is a major ferry port and is one of two free ports in Ireland, the other being in the Shannon area.

    Hence, our ship docked here without much delay on a freezing Friday morning but luckily it was also sunny!

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel
    • Cruise

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    Blarney Woollen Mills

    by AusPinay Written May 23, 2010

    The Blarney Woollen Mills (www.blarney.com) is a large store selling crystal, ceramics, clothing and gifts, based in the old woollen mill in Blarney. Originally built in 1824 the mill was a water mill making woollens and tweeds, and employing local people. The Mill closed in 1973, and was eventually bought by a man called Christy Kelleher, who had worked in the woollen mill as a boy. Christy has since died, but his family business continues.

    However, it is not just the shopping we came here for- there's the restaurant/cafe where we had a taste of the classic Irish coffee which was part of the bus tour tariff. There are also lots of things to see here- not just the products. There is also a hotel in the premises as part of the Woollen Mills and of course, an Irish pub! We stayed quite a while here to soak in the local atmosphere! The locals were very friendly and we enjoyed this part of Cork so much!

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Eco-Tourism

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    The River Lee

    by suvanki Updated Apr 6, 2010

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    The centre of Cork is an island, formed by the River Lee (an laoi in Irish) splitting in 2 as it reaches the city.

    Corks name comes from the gaelic Corcaigh, meaning marsh. At one time , the city was a series of small islets reclaimed from the marshland, and boats could enter these channels. Many of these have been filled in now. Some of the cities wider streets such as Patrick Street , South Mall and The Grand Parade were originally river channels.

    Part of Corks charm is that you cross some of its 30 + bridges while walking around the city.

    Views from the bridges offer some moody photo ops, especially at night, with lights reflecting on the water.

    The River Lee originates in West Cork, in the Shehy mountain range of Gauganberra . It flows for 56 miles to Cork Harbour and into the Celtic Sea.

    The river was famed for its salmon fishing. With the construction of hydro-electric dams, in 1956, the salmon population decreased markedly - as the young salmon ( Smolts) were unable to return to sea, The Electricity Supply Board have since constructed a hatchery at Carrigrohid, with the aim of releasing 136,000 smolts per year into the river.

    Salmon fishing is a popular past time for locals and anglers who travel from overseas to enjoy the scenery and fishing in one of the best stretches in Ireland.. The fishing of salmon is quite controlled, and is restricted to an 8-mile stretch of river from Inniscarra Dam to the centre of Cork City. For info / permits etc contact Cork Salmon Anglers' Association Ltd; the Lee Salmon Anglers' Club or the Electicity Supply Board.

    Along the River of the east side of Cork can be seen many Quays and Docks, with warehouses.

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Fishing
    • Historical Travel

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    The Cork Butter Museum

    by dila Written Aug 11, 2009

    My opion is that it is only intresting if you have something with butter or want to know how its made.

    Opening hours
    Open daily
    Mar – Oct 10.00 – 17.00
    Jul – Aug 10.00 – 18.00

    Group tours and off season visits by prior arrangement

    Admission prices
    Full €4.00
    Seniors/Students €3.00
    School Students €1.50
    Children under 12 (no charge)

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    TOURIST INFORMATION

    by DAO Updated Jun 12, 2009

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    Oifig Fáilte (Tourist Office) is located on Grand Parade near the English Market. They have maps and absolute loads of leaflets on everything and anything in Cork and all over Ireland. You may find their website maddening and a bit complex. Cork is very small an easy to get around. You could start here in the morning and see the whole town in 1 day.

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    Shandon - The Butter Museum and Craft Centre

    by suvanki Updated Nov 8, 2008

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    I'm afraid that I didn't have time to visit this unique museum during my whirlwind tour of Shandon, I just glanced at it as I was passing. However, the museum offers an insight into Irelands most famous food export, and IT IS THE WORLDS LARGEST BUTTER MUSEUM!!
    The museum is housed in the original Cork Butter Exchange. In 1700, it was the worlds largest butter market. In the mid 19th Century it sold 1.25 million sterlings worth of butter!!!

    Either visit the museum, or check out its website, for info about the history and importance of butter production in the 19th Century for the economy, social, commercial and domestic effects on the lives of Corks citizens

    Opening hours
    Open daily
    Mar – Oct 10.00 – 17.00
    Jul – Aug 10.00 – 18.00

    Group tours and off season visits by prior arrangement

    Admission prices
    Full €3.50
    Seniors/Students €2.50
    School Students €1.50
    Children under 12 (no charge)

    Peeping inside the door, I saw a poster for The Shandon Craft Centre that is housed in this building. Apparently local artisans produce their crafts (such as jewellery and stained glass) here. As it was nearly Halloween (31st October) there was a display of skeletons decorating the entrance. The previous day, at Blarney Castle there had been some ghoulish and humerous puppets etc on display.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits
    • Food and Dining

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    Shandon- The Firkin Crane

    by suvanki Updated Nov 8, 2008

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    The Firkin Crane was originally part of the Butter Market in the 19th Century (The Butter Museum is a few metres away) Since the 1980's it has been a centre of Arts and Culture, with its main purpose being a focus for Dance in Ireland. There are 4 dance studios contained in its circular walls
    This isn't just a place for would be 'Riverdancers' to practice and perform. Ballet, Belly Dancing, Tango , Salsa, Circus Aerial performance and African Drumming are just some of the classes held, as well as performances from a variety of Dance styles. Check the web site for more info.
    I'm afraid that I didn't get a chance at this visit to look inside - Next time I will!

    I was familiar with the Firkin being a measurement, or small barrel for beer, now (with the help of Wikipedia), I know that it was also a barrel for holding butter or soap!
    Typically having a lid and handles.A Firkin was usually 10" high and 10" in diameter. Barrels either held 56 1lbs (25.4 kgs) or 64 1lbs (29.0kg)

    Firkin is an old English volume measurement.

    Its' name possibly originates from the old Middle Dutch word - vierdekijn = fourth.

    A Firkin was a quarter (1/4) of a full sized barrel.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Theater Travel

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    Shandon

    by suvanki Updated Nov 8, 2008

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    Shandon is one of the oldest areas of Cork. Its name in Gaelic is An Seandun, and originates from the old Sean Dun meaning Old Fort. It grew outside the City Walls.
    Shandon was one of 28 ancient settlements of Cork city and its surrounding area. It is located in the North of the city.

    I visited Shandon briefly, with Ekaterinburg (Katherine) on the Monday morning after the Cork VT weekend meeting, before I sadly had to head back to the airport.

    Shandon has quite an arty feel- painted houses, pubs, museums and an Arts and Crafts centre. My visit was on a cold grey October morning-I'd love to be here on a warm summers evening, where music is played in the streets!

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Budget Travel

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    LEFT LUGGAGE

    by DAO Written Nov 3, 2008

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    Need to leave some baggage? Just pay and drop them off at the Bus Eireann (main bus station) on Parnell Place. Charged by the day, you can store luggage up to a month. Unclaimed bags are disposed of after 30 days.

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