Irish Literature, Dublin

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    Oscar Wilde's House
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  • IrishFem's Profile Photo

    Famous Irish People

    by IrishFem Updated Jan 4, 2010

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    Favorite thing: Bram Stoker.. 1847 - 1912.. Author of DRACULA.. only after his death did the count receive lasting immortality..Born in Dublin, he started career as an unpaid drama critic for the Dublin Evening Mail, the newspaper of that time.

    Oscar Wide... his famous plays... The Importance of Being Earnest... Lady Windermeresfan.. his adapted movie... an Ideal Husband.. lets face it girls... is there such a man...

    George Bernard Shaw.. (1856- 1950) who's work dominated the theatre and who as is said, hated Dublin,moved to London to be with his mother... his plays were banned in Dublin for blasphemy and and obscenity.. he was awarded the nobel prize for literature in 1925.. he later adapted the musical My Fair Lady... my fellow country man whom we still love and admire..

    James Larkin, ( 1876- 1947)
    He was the founder of the Irish Transport and General Workers Union. He played a influential and heroic role in laying the foundations of the trade union movement in Ireland. His statue can been seen in O'Connell Street.

    Sean O'Casey (1880-1964)
    Dublin born writer. Sean was a self educated labourer. He wrote 3 plays the Shadow of Dunma, Juno and the Paycock and the Plough and the Stars all of which were produced by the Abbey Theatre. His plays are his own experiences during the Easter rising, the Civil War and the War of Independence.

    Jonathan Swift (1667- 1745) Novelist and clerygman. Born in Dublin. His most famous work was Gullivers Travels . In 1714 he was appointed Dean of St Patrick's cathedral in Dublin where he held that post shortly before his death.

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    Oscar Wilde Lived Here

    by tvor Written Mar 29, 2003

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    Favorite thing: Oscar Wilde, Victorian poet and playwrite, was born in Dublin. He became infamous at the end of his life for the relationship he had with Lord Alfred Douglas leading to sodomy trials, the charges brought against him by the Marquess of Queensbury, Douglas's father. Before that, Wilde was famous for his flamboyant lifestyle and clever, witty plays and poems. He is widely quoted and in Dublin his home is now the American College, on the north corner of Merrion Square. There are two short pillars next to the statue of the languid Oscar relaxing on a stone with a flower in his hand. The pillars have some of the more famous Oscar quotes carved into them and on the top of one of them is the sculpture of the pregnant woman that you see in this photo. She represents Oscar's mother Lady Francesca Wilde.

    Fondest memory: Near Merrion Square is Green's Bookstore. When you go in here you could easily lose yourself in time, picturing the famous poets and writers such as Wilde, James Joyce and others browsing the stacks.

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    Irish Literature

    by agarcia Written Mar 23, 2003

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    Mr. Wilde, resting for a while

    Favorite thing: One of the most remarkable artistic legacies of the island, along with the music, is the literature. It somehow surprising that a country of the size of Ireland had been able to produce four Noble laureates (until now)…. Dublin is packed with literary references, such as the Oscar Wilde house (placed in front of Merrion Square). Nor to mention that this city is the scenario for Ulysses, one of my all time favorite novels.

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    Deh Litterrashure ...

    by Lochlainn Updated Feb 28, 2003

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    Greene's Bookshop, Clare Street

    Favorite thing: Dublin's reputation as a literary city is well justified and there is still a regard for scribblers in the town that often exceeds the merit of their scribblings. Part of the explanation for this may lie in the poverty that prevailed in the city for much of its recent history (escapism and poverty go hand in hand), part of it may be due to the strong essence of academia that permeates the Dublin air (three universities and umpteen colleges may be considered a mite excessive for a town this size), but the true explanation may merely rest instead in the Dubliner's love of storytelling and the philosophy that while truth may make a great foundation, it is the embellishment of a structure that makes it unique and memorable.

    To those who see Dublin as a literary Mecca, then the shrines at which they should pay homage must include The Dublin Writers' Museum on Parnell Square, The James Joyce Museum in Sandycove, Marsh's Library by St Patrick's Cathedral and any one of the sadly diminishing collective of bookshops, whose book barrows once constituted an intrinsic feature of Dublin's street furniture.

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    Sandycove:a little harbour...

    by ciaramalone Updated Aug 24, 2002

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    Favorite thing: Sandycove:a little harbour where the James Joyce Museum can be found in the Martello Tower, featuring memorabilia, letters, first and rare editions and many items associated with Joycean Dublin. The nearby village of Glasthule comes alive on June 16th, Bloomsday, so names after the main character, Leopold Bloom, in Joyce's famous masterpiece Ulysses.

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    explore the impressive Joyce...

    by Krystynn Updated Aug 24, 2002

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    Favorite thing: explore the impressive Joyce Tower. This tower is apparently built in such a way that it was able to withstand an invasion by Napoleon Bonaparte. Today, this monument is a museum devoted to the life and works of James Joyce, the writer who brought 'Ulysses' to life. It's situated approx. 16 km away from the city of Dublin.... So, it's definitely well worth a visit.

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    Stroll through Merrion Square...

    by ciaramalone Written Aug 24, 2002

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    Favorite thing: Stroll through Merrion Square and walk in the footsteps of Oscar Wilde. Witness the splendour of some of the finest georgian architecture in the world

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