Local traditions and culture in Dublin

  • Local Customs
    by yooperprof
  • Local Customs
    by yooperprof
  • a drink in the lobby bar before the show
    a drink in the lobby bar before the show
    by yooperprof

Most Viewed Local Customs in Dublin

  • Jefie's Profile Photo

    Temple Bar Book Market

    by Jefie Written May 25, 2009

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    Every Saturday and Sunday from 11:00 am to 6:00 pm, rain or shine, there is a secondhand book market held at Temple Bar Square. There is an ecclectic but surprisingly good selection books offered, ranging from children's books to classic literature and bestsellers. You think you're just going to have a quick look, and next thing you know you're buying half a dozen novels (OK, maybe that's just me!). Unless they're rare items, books are generally sold at about half the original price. It's truly worth stopping by!

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    Politics

    by don1dublin Written Apr 7, 2004

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    Do not bring up anything Political while in a pub or bar sipping away at your pint......bars are for drinking......please dont ask us what we think about the situation in the north.....we dont want to be explaining 800 years of history on a fri or sat nite.....please read your history books before coming :0)

    Thanks

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    Doors of Dublin

    by Dabs Updated Nov 8, 2009

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    As you stroll through Dublin, you may notice the red brick Georgian houses can be distinguished from one another by their colorful doors, red next door to blue next door to yellow. And if you step foot in any tourist shop, you'll see posters and postcards featuring the "Doors of Dublin".

    Several different theories are espoused by tour guides to how these doors came about, one has writer George Moore living next to another writer, Oliver St John Gogarty, Moore painting his door green so that the drunken Gogarty wouldn't think it was his door and Gogarty painting his door red so that the drunken Moore wouldn't think it was his door. Another states that after the death of Queen Victoria England ordered the Irish to paint their doors black and instead they thumbed their noses at England and painted them in bright colors.

    I suspect the truth is closer to this theory, the Georgian row houses are all very similar, in order to set themselves apart, they added ornamental things such as door knockers and fanlights and painted their doors in bright colors.

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    Meeting places

    by Ruai Updated May 13, 2006

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    Dublin has many meeting places but generations of Dubliners met for a first date, or just to head off for a night out, at the clock at Easons on O'Connell St. Bewleys Cafe on Grafton St played much the same role on the southside :-)

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    Names of Railway stations

    by sourbugger Written Oct 2, 2006

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    I am assured that there was some kind of law passed in the 1960's that said that some public buildings had to be re-named to honour leaders of the 1916 uprising.

    Thus we now have Heuston, Connolly and Pearse stations in Dublin. Whilst I have heard Heuston referred to as 'Kingsbridge station', I've never heard Connolly referered to as 'Amiens st'. At least Sean Hueston worked at the station - so the the historical reference is well founded.

    The new station being built at Spencer Dock will probably not follow this tradition.

    Whilst it smacks a little of that Eastern Block / Russina obsession with re-naming whole cities, it is at least good to remember a little of the history.

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    Raising your glass!

    by Marpessa Updated Jan 29, 2006

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    In the time I have spent in Ireland I think I am yet to buy my own drink! You will often find that when visiting a bar or pub here in Ireland and people find out you are a visitor, they will buy you a drink*.

    Of course you should always offer to buy them a drink in return.

    If you are going out with a group in Ireland (with Irish friends), they will sometimes buy drinks in rounds, ie, one person goes to the bar and buys eveyones drinks and then the next round it is someone elses turn to buy. Although this will depend entirely on the group of people you are with, so just watch and see if people are buying their own drinks or it they're going to buy them in rounds.

    *no guarantees, sorry :)

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    irish Humour.

    by sourbugger Updated Jan 4, 2011

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    Came across a great website recently. It is called 'overheardin Dublin', part of 'overheardinIreland'. People basically just post any funny story (real-life) or conversation they have heard. Some of the stuff is a bit on the rude side, but much of it is hilarious.

    Here is typical example (from www.overheardindublin.com)overheard on the LUAS

    A woman scanger got on a packed luas at Jervis Street.She began to shout her conversation down her phone for everyone to hear, with her phone on loudspeaker.She said "What's the next stop after The Four Courts? The person on the end of the phone replied "Mountjoy".

    NB . This joke is only understandable to some, and I shan't be explaining it.

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    The 'Chipper'

    by Marpessa Written Dec 23, 2005

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    After a night out on the town in Dublin, you will find that a lot of people will head to a 'chipper' afterwards. These places can get very crowded, very quickly.

    For those of you who don't know what a chipper - it is basically a place to buy hot chips (plain or in gravy or curry), burgers and the like. They will also only sell non-alcoholic drinks ;)

    Especially after the clubs have closed, chippers become very popular, as people try to linger and stay out a bit longer before finally heading home. You will usually find a chipper no more than a block or two from most clubs.

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  • Ewingjr98's Profile Photo

    Money

    by Ewingjr98 Written Jan 1, 2006

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    Ireland was one of the original 12 countries to adopt the Euro in 2002. When I visited in 1999, the Irish Punt (pronounced "poont") was still the currency du jour.

    Money is not much of a problem in Ireland. Your major credit cards are accepted most places, and ATMs are abundant.

    Ireland is an expensive place to visit. A 2005 survey found Ireland was the 2nd most expensive of 12 popular vacation spots in Europe and North America. Meals in Ireland ranked as the most expensive of these 12 nations.

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  • sourbugger's Profile Photo

    The last place i would visit

    by sourbugger Updated Jan 4, 2011

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    I was fascinated recently by a walk through Glasnevin cemetry. It houses over one million souls and still has some room left.

    Some of the more modern graves from the late 1970's seem to have started something of a trend. Finding pictures of the deceased was not too unusual (it is quite common in many European countries) but other things were. I started noticing that some people have added where they lived. Not just the area but their house address. I suppose it is only a matter of time before people add their mobile phone number and e-mail address.

    Other graves also had their nickname added e.g Patrick 'paddy' Murphy. harmless enough, but a bit unfortunate if your nickname is 'Knobhead' or 'Sweaty betty' or 'Strangely brown'.

    More poiniantly, the children's cemetry close to the entrance is an overwhelming rainbow of children's windmills, soft toys, and any number of brightly coloured trinkets. The effect of so many well-tended graves is somewhat overwhelming.

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    Signs of social and cultural change

    by yooperprof Updated Aug 2, 2013

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    The Irish economy may be in the doldrums, youth unemployment is truly disheartening, and the rates of significant emigration have returned - but there is no mistaking the reality that in the last 20 years Ireland has changed irrevocably, and there will be no returning to the ways of the past. It probably has something to do with Ireland joining the EU, it probably has something to do with major scandals in the most important institutions of the country, it probably has something to Ryan Air. . . But wherever it is coming from, the presence of change is evident to even the casual visitor.

    Of course, you'll find a lot more of that change in Dublin than elsewhere. And of course, Ireland is still and will always be - well, Irish. But at the same time, there's no doubt that Ireland has become less unusual, less of an "outlier" in cultural and social mores - and I don't think that's entirely a bad thing.

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    Theatre - the Abbey

    by yooperprof Written Jul 28, 2013

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    The Abbey is one of the most important theatres in Dublin, associated with the Irish Literary Revival since its founding in 1904. The Abbey is still respected and revered for continuing its great tradition of sponsoring new Irish writing for the theatre. It also puts on classic plays from the around the world, often interpreting them with a unique Irish flare. In March 2013 I saw "King Lear" here - only the second time it had been presented at the Abbey.

    20 Lower Abbey Street, on the north side of the Liffey

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    Doors

    by ZiOOlek Written Jan 5, 2007

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    Ireland is famous for its colourful and unique doors. You may see many intersing doors in Dublin. It is said that a door is one of the most important this when you choose a house. A nice looking door may be a proude for all the family.:)

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  • sarahandgareth's Profile Photo

    Local topics of conversation

    by sarahandgareth Written Jul 3, 2003

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    You'll find, if you eavesdrop on conversations, two themes that are constant favourites among Dubliners. First, the old reliable, the weather, but second, the new reliable, the price of houses. That might lead on to a discussion of the price of things in Dublin generally, including, inevitably, the price of drink.

    Irish people (since I am one, I feel more comfortable with the stereotype!), like English people, appear constantly amazed and shocked by the weather, as if rain was a personal insult: it's incredible that we get so much mileage out of weather that is rarely all that out of the ordinary, but it's the subtle variations that appeal to us. The most famous bit of Irish weather irony is, of course, the description of light rain as 'a nice soft day'.

    House prices are quickly becoming an obsession to rival the weather: the price of property is a real problem in Dublin, especially for a young buyer, but again, talking about it every single evening doesn't do a whole lot to change the situation...!

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  • orlikins's Profile Photo

    The 40 foot dive

    by orlikins Updated Jan 3, 2004

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    This is a long-standing Dublin tradition, where on New Year's Day, Dubliners go down to The 40-foot on the coast and dive in! Usually any money raised from doing this is given to charity but I guess a lot of people do it so they can get lots of hot whiskey from the organisers after the dive! :)

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Dublin Local Customs

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