Festivals, Dublin

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  • St. Patrick's Day
    St. Patrick's Day
    by Airpunk
  • St. Patrick's Day
    St. Patrick's Day
    by Airpunk
  • St. Patrick's Day
    St. Patrick's Day
    by Airpunk
  • Airpunk's Profile Photo

    St. Patrick's Day

    by Airpunk Written May 8, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Since I was of legal age, I had the urge to dress in green and drink a beer. I usually do this only when I watch a game of my favourite team, Werder Bremen, but the Irish offer me a far greater event for it. St. Patrick’s Day is celebrated on March 17th, the day St. Patrick died in 493. St. Patrick is said to have brought christianity to Ireland and to have expelled the snakes out of Ireland. The latter is a legend only. Anyway, St. Patrick explained the holy trinity to the Irish pagans with the help of a Shamrock. That’s why everyone dresses in green and were shamrock motives. It is not because of Werder Bremen or Celtic Glasgow…
    Today, St. Patrick is the patron saint of the Irish and the Guinness drinkers. In Dublin he is celebrated with a week-long festival which culminates on March 17th. The parade is among the largest in the world, but not the largest one. Worldwide, Paddy’s day finds more friends and in every corner of the world where you find an Irish pub, there’s the chance that something’s gong on on March 17th. Still, St. Patrick’s day in Dublin attracts more and more tourists every year. Beside the official festivity events, there are many unofficial ones like street artist performances or live music in every bar. The whole city is a party area with its center in Temple Bar. Get yourself something green, wish locals and fellow tourists a happy St. Patrick’s day and enjoy a pint of Guinness. On this day, probably my favourite holiday in the year, everyone is Irish!

    St. Patrick's Day St. Patrick's Day P��g mo th��in - kiss my ass St. Patrick St. Patrick's Day
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  • IrishFem's Profile Photo

    St Patricks Weekend 2003

    by IrishFem Updated Sep 27, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    St Patricks festival kicks off from the 11th March to the 17th March every year.
    St Patrick is the parton saint of Ireland. Although born in England he was kidnapped and taken to Ireland as a slave. He escaped and joined the religious order. Became a bishop and was sent back to Ireland in ad 432. He converted thousands including the High King of Tara he did not drive snakes from Ireland because we never had any. He made the shamrock a symbol of Ireland by using its shape to explain the oneness of the Trinity of Father, son and holy ghost. The Harp is the national symbol of Ireland which not many people know. The parade in the Saints honour gets bigger and better every year. Thousands of people come out to cheer on the participants from all over the world. I am sure you have heard the drowning of the shamrock which really means drinking for that whole weekend. Its only in the last few years that the parade has got bigger, with a whole weekend devoted to music, exhibitions shows and street and theatre performances, fire work display along the liffey are now a very big tourist attraction with performers from all over the world, African, South American and Europeans joining in the parade.

    May the Irish hills caress you.
    May her lakes and rivers bless you.
    May the luck of the Irish enfold you.
    May the blessings of Saint Patrick behold you

    Look up the following website for more information.
    www.stpatricksfestival.ie

    Irish Dancer
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  • Lochlainn's Profile Photo

    The Samhain Parade

    by Lochlainn Updated Jul 14, 2003

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Samhain Parade
    Though Dubliners tend not to need much excuse for a party, the annual St Patrick's Day parade, albeit improved in recent years, is still very much of an anti-climax, dominated as it is by commercially sponsored floats and goose pimpled majorettes with spooky fixed grins imported especially for the occasion. The day is characterised by excessive drinking, bored children and atrocious weather most years! Since 1995 however, the Samhain Festival (Halloween) has more than made up for the former's failure - the parade itself, culminating in a giant fireworks display is merely one of many activities going on in and around the city streets. And as the main event is an evening occasion, the day is not marred by eejits who have ensconced themselves in public houses for twelve hour stretches! Also as it is Halloween after all, many of the 'spectators' are dressed as outlandishly as the performers. A really great vibe and a thoroughly enjoyable evening!

    Halloween gets the bird

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