Four Courts, Dublin

4 out of 5 stars 18 Reviews

Inns Quay Dublin 8 01 872 5555

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  • Four Courts
    by rcsparty
  • Four Courts
    Four Courts
    by Mikebb
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    four courts
    by doug48
  • rcsparty's Profile Photo

    Four Courts

    by rcsparty Written May 9, 2009

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    The Four Courts building was completed in 1796. During the Irish Civil War it was significantly damaged, but restored to its original design in 1932. The name reflects the 4 division of the old Irish judiciary...Chancery, Kings Bench, Excheqeur and Common Pleas. It is the current home to the Irish Supreme Court.

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    Four Courts - A Majestic Building

    by Mikebb Updated Mar 23, 2009

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    Four Courts

    The Four Courts building can be seen from the Hop On Hop off Tour Bus as it drives along the Liffey Riverside. You will have to get off the bus at the Old Jameson Distillery stop and walk a few hundred metres to the Four Courts. With limited time we remained on the bus.

    Completed in 1796 it was seriously damaged during the Civil War of 1916 when occupied by the rebels and bombarded by government troops. By 1932 the building had been restored using the original design. The building has a beautiful copper covered lantern dome and a 6 column Corinthian portico.

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    the four courts

    by doug48 Written Jul 7, 2007

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    four courts

    this beautiful building was built in 1796 by the architect james gandon who also built the dublin customs house. it was gutted during the irish civil war 120 years later when government forces bombarded anti-treaty rebels that had taken over the building. the four counts was reconstructed in 1932 according to gandon's original plans. the hall under the dome is open to the public.

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  • john&eduarda's Profile Photo

    The historic Four Courts

    by john&eduarda Updated Jan 1, 2007

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    ..are a nice place to visit in Dublin. If you have seen photos or read commentaries from the various uprisings in Ireland between 1916 - 1923 you will probably know that the Four Courts played a prominent role as a strategic point, particularly during the civil war.

    New Security measures in place mean that you can no longer enter the front door as you once could. Instead you must use one of the side entrances, each manned by a security point. Once inside you will have to find your way to the 'Roundhall' which is the large rotund building with the green roof that you can see from outside. There are four 'High Courts' here, numbered 1 - 4. You can probably enter - provided the words 'in camera' are not written on the door.

    The Supreme Court is the Court facing the roundhall, and the Court of Criminal Appeal is next door. Ask at the information desk for details about the building.

    You'll find its a fascinating place to visit, with a mixture of tourists, interested members of the public, barristers, solicitors, journalists and the odd judge appearing and disappearing as the day goes on.

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    The Four Courts

    by MichaelFalk1969 Written Jul 22, 2006

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    Another example of outstanding Georgian architecture: The Four Courts. Only problem is, they are a bit far off by foot. On the other hand, if you made it there, you`re halfway to the Guinness Brewery !

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    The Four Courts

    by IrishFem Updated Sep 27, 2005

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    Four Courts
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    The Four Courts like the Custom House was built by James Gandon in 1786 to 1802. Both building are very neoclassical.
    The four courts are located on the Quay's. In 1916 the four courts was set on fire during the uprising, most of the manuscripts and important documents were destroyed. In 1932 the building was restored. You can see shelling on parts of the building. The four courts houses the Irish Court and Supreme court and is also home to the law library. Many areas of the building are restricted areas. You mostly see barristers in the full traditional outfits and members of the Gardai (Police) escorting prisoners from the courts.
    Entrance is free. Open Mon- Fri from 10am to 1pm and 2pm to 4pm.

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  • elcolibri's Profile Photo

    Four Courts

    by elcolibri Written May 29, 2005
    Four Courts

    Fort Courts in the north bank of the Liffey is an important and famous building in Dublin. Built in 1796, destroyed during the Irish Civil War of 1921-22 and restored again, it most important feature is the dome which you can see as an splendid one from the other bank of the river or from O Donovan Bridge.

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  • ATXtraveler's Profile Photo

    Four Courts Building Dublin

    by ATXtraveler Written Feb 1, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Four Courts Dublin

    Finished in 1802 after 20 years of building, the Four Courts building is the current home of the Supreme Court of Ireland, and is rich in history.

    The British troops fired on this building in 1916, and Michael Collins shelled the building in 1922. The building was then set on fire destroying tons of historical documents. It was restored in 1932 and contains a wonderful law library as well.

    Mon-Fri 10am-1pm and 2pm-4pm
    Free admission

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  • hevbell's Profile Photo

    FOUR COURTS

    by hevbell Updated Jan 8, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    four courts

    Take a walk along the River Liffey and you will see this large imposing building on the north bank. This is another of the Georgian buildings designed by James Gandon who also designed Customs House

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    Four Courts

    by Ines28 Written Oct 13, 2004

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    Four Courts

    This majestic building was finished in 1796 and been destroyed nearly entirely 120 years later during the civil war. In 1932, the main buildings have been rebuilt according to the original plans. The Four Courts reside in the two wings at either side. The waiting hall under the large dome can be visited by the public.

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    The Four Courts

    by Mahieu Written Apr 29, 2004

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    This building can be seen from all along the Liffey, well almost at least. Since 1796 it is home to the Irish law courts.It is one of the finest neo-classical buildings of Dublin. The most remarkable parts are the dome, the Corinthian columns and the 4 statues representing Justice, Mercy, Wisdom, and Moses.

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    City Centre Tour V Four Courts/Wood Quay

    by Buckz Updated Dec 2, 2003

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Four Courts

    Walking from the Sunlight Chambers to the next bridge you walk past a viking boat sculpture (reminiscent of Reykjavik) and the civic offices at Wood Quay. This is the oldest part of Dublin, and there was alot of opposition to the building of these modern offices. The site unearthed many viking artefacts, but still contains many many more.
    When you reach the bridge you will be spoilt for views. the Four Courts accross the river is your required James Gandon Building (The Customs house is another, and he designed a number of other famous buildings throughout the country).

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    The Four Courts

    by jenna24 Written Aug 25, 2002

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    The Four Courts
    The Four Courts stands on the River Liffey . Built by James Gandon between 1786-1802, the four courts within; the Exchequer, Common Please, King's Bench and Chancery, lead off from a circular central hall. The building now acts as the seat of the High Court of Justice of Ireland and also as a kind of chambers for barristers.

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  • orlikins's Profile Photo

    Four Courts

    by orlikins Updated Apr 4, 2011

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Four Courts on the Liffey

    Four courts on Inns Quay is one of Dublin's top memorable landmarks. It was one of the key points during the Easter 1916 rising but is now the Irish High and Supreme Court and Law Library.

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  • Four Courts

    by sabsi Updated Feb 8, 2007

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Four Courts

    Well it's the court. And it's a nice building. Apparenly you can go and watch some courtcases if you like. I never went to see one though! But I like the look and the location of the building.

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