General Post Office, Dublin

4 out of 5 stars 4 Stars - 29 Reviews

O'Connell Street +353 1 705 7000

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  • The GPO's 6 Ionic columns
    The GPO's 6 Ionic columns
    by Durfun
  • The GPO building, facing the Spire
    The GPO building, facing the Spire
    by Durfun
  • General Post Office
    General Post Office
    by Jase1177
  • Airpunk's Profile Photo

    Dublin General Post Office (GPO)

    by Airpunk Written May 8, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    1916 declaration of independence

    The post office itself is a beautiful building with Georgian, neoclassical architecture. Indeed, it was the last of its kind to be built in Dublin and opened to the public in 1818. Inside, all the wooden counters from the early 20th century has been kept, which makes the post office itself an attraction to visit. However, there is far more about this building.
    Shortly after a restoration was completed in early 1916, several organisation joined forces and occupied key point in Dublin. They declared independence from Britain and made the Post Office their headquarters. This took place from Easter Monday 1916 (April 24th) and lasted six days. Little sympathy came from Irish citizens at first and some were even upset that the newly refurbished building was misused in such a way (indeed, the furnishing was heavily damaged during fighting). It was the treatment of the leaders by British authorities (most were imprisoned, many executed) that changed the mind of the Irish and fuelled further independence movements.
    Today, there are things remembering the Easter rising which worth to see in the post office. The small philatelic office contains not only philatelic exhibitions, but also an exhibition about the Easter Rising. It includes a monument portraying the death of the mythological leader Cúchulainn, pictures from the leaders of the rising, a commemorative plaque and an original copy of the declaration of independence issued upon seizure of the post office. Another fact which is worth to mention: All national distances from/to Dublin are measured from this place.

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    GPO

    by irish147 Updated Apr 4, 2011
    Christmas in Dublin

    This is the main post office in Dublin. DUBLIN'S premier street is O'Connell street and it is regarding as the heart of the city centre. This is where buses leave for the airport, where major fast food companies have outlets, and where people arrange to meet. No-one ever seems to stop in O'Connell street, probably because it is incredibly busy, and it is not really attractive as far as the prime streets of major world cities go. I love dublin very nice city, and very easy to get around dublin..www.guinness.ie

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  • An Post Museum - GPO Dublin

    by DublinBunny Updated Mar 10, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    An Post Museum in Dublin’s GPO opened its doors for the very first time in August 2010 with the Letters, Lives and Liberty Exhibition.
    Situated in the very heart of Dublin’s City Centre the An Post Museum gives a unique and wonderful insight in to the history of one of Ireland’s oldest and most respected institutions, the Irish Post Office.

    It celebrates the influence that the Irish Post Office has had on Irish society, politics, transport and technology.

    From stamps and mail boats to the role of GPO staff on Easter Monday 1916, Letters, Lives and Liberty tells the story of how the Post Office has played a vital role in the development of Irish society over the generations.
    The An Post Museum offers visitors a new insight and a chance to experience a rare piece Irish history.

    Set inside one of Ireland's most iconic buildings, the GPO, the An Post Museum offers visitors the opportunity listen to the stories of the past describing life as a Postal Servant in Ireland. Visitors can see the finest examples of Ireland's first ever stamps in spectacular colour and detail. Visitors can learn for what it was like to be in the GPO during the 1916 Rising and much more.

    The Letters, Lives and Liberty exhibition combines old and new technologies bringing to life the story of the Post Office in Ireland from its earliest beginnings right up to today.
    The audio visuals and interactive displays allow visitors to choose subjects of particular interest as they explore aspects of the Irish Post Office story.

    Cost of entry to the exhibition is €2 per person

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    GPO facing the Spire

    by Durfun Written Dec 31, 2009

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    The GPO's 6 Ionic columns
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    This was the headquarters of "The Rising" in 1916. It's interior was destroyed by British shelling.

    You can easily recognise this building by it's impressive Graeco-Roman style portico supported by six Ionic columns.

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    General Post Office

    by Dabs Updated Nov 29, 2009

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    The General Post Office, which has an important place in Irish history, was originally built in 1814-1818. It had just reopened after remodeling in March 1916, in April 1916 it was destroyed during the Easter Uprising. It was here on Easter Monday, April 24, 1916, that Patrick Pearse stood on the steps and read the Proclamation of the Republic declaring a free Irish Republic after which he and his supporters barricaded themselves inside the Post Office.

    They eventually surrendered on Saturday April 29th, on Sunday April 30 they were marched through town, jeered by Dubliners who were mad that part of their city had been destroyed. That sentiment would change just a few days later after what was believed to be an unfair trial and almost immediate execution of the rebel leaders, in particular the execution of James Connolly who was too weak to stand and was shot while tied to a chair.

    Although I didn't look for them, I read that you can still see the bullet holes in some of the exterior columns and inside you can see a series of paintings telling the story of the Easter Uprising.

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    Go Postal

    by Jase1177 Written May 20, 2009

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    General Post Office

    Near the center of O'Connell St sits the historic General Post Office, epicenter of the 1916 Easter Uprising. As I understand it, the building was bombed during fighting but much of it remained and was restored. The GPO remains a functioning post office with many users daily. There is a statue of the mythical hero Cuchulainn in the main window, depicting his death. The building a good example of Georgian architecture on the inside and out. It is open to the public to walk in and view the building and the paintings on the wall.

    Cost: Free
    Hours: 8AM-8PM M-S

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  • call_me_rhia's Profile Photo

    The General Post Office (GPO)

    by call_me_rhia Written Aug 17, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    GPO

    The General Post Office, which everyone simply calls GPO, is a majestic building located on O'Connell street - it's the headquarters of the Irish postal service but this is of tertiary importance. Tertiary? Yes.

    The second reason is mainly an architectonical reason: the General Post Office was the last of the great Georgian public buildings to were erected in Dublin. See the 6 column in front of it? Walk closely and see if you can spot some 1916 bullet-marks.

    The first reason why this building is important is historical. The GPO is tied to the 1916 Easter rising: the headquarters of the failed rebellion were here, and it was outside the GPO that Patrick Pearse, president of the Provisional Government, read out the Proclamation of the Republic. for the first time.

    I also have my personal reason... back in 1989 the Guilford Four (Paul Hill, Gerry Conlon, Paddy Armstrong and Carole Richardson) were released after having been wrongfully imprisoned in a British prison for 15 years, accused of being IRA members. Paul Hill came to Dublin that year, and spoke to thousands of people in front of the GPO... I was one of them.

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    GPO

    by barryg23 Updated Aug 23, 2007

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    GPO

    The General Post Office, or GPO as it's always referred to as, is one of Ireland’s most important buildings. This importance is not because of its architecture, or its function; rather, the GPO was the headquarters of the Easter Rising in 1916, a hugely significant event in Irish history which lead to Irish Independence from Britain in 1921. There is a statue of the ancient Irish hero Cúchulainn in the main window facing onto O’Connell street.

    The original columns outside the buildings still contain bullet marks from the fighting in the Rising, while an original copy of the Proclamation of Irish Independence, a proclamation read out by Padraig Pearse at the building in 1916, is on display.

    Aside from its historical importance the GPO building, which dates from the early 19th century, is visually one of the most impressive in Dublin. It was badly damaged but not destroyed during the rising, and was later restored to it’s original state by the new Irish Government. In recent years, O’ Connell street has undergone much restoration, in particular the sections near the GPO - an appropriate act for a building so important to Irish history.

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    GPO

    by doug48 Updated Jul 7, 2007

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    GPO

    the general post office was built in 1818 and became famous for the 1916 easter uprising. on easter sunday 1916 members of the irish volunteers and the irish citizens army seized the building. the british shelled the post office for a week and finally forced the rebels out. in the following weeks 14 of the leaders of the uprising were caught and were executed at kilmainham goal. today only the facade of the original post office remains.

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  • MalenaN's Profile Photo

    GPO

    by MalenaN Updated Mar 21, 2007

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    Inside the General Post Office
    1 more image

    The General Post Office (GPO) has got an important place in Irish history. It became the headquarter of the Easter Rising of 1916 and it was from the stairs of this building that the Proclamation of Independence was read. The British attacked the building which got extensively damaged. Bullet marks can still be seen on the columns and the frieze.

    The General Post office was built in 1816 and was designed by Francis Johnston. The interior has got a spacious and light postal hall, busy between 8am - 8pm.

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  • General Post Office (GPO)

    by sabsi Updated Feb 8, 2007

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    GPO

    Here you can still smell history in this buildung. It's where the Easter Rising in 1916 mainly took place. There's still holes from the bullets in the walls...

    Don't only take a picture from the outside, make sure to have a look inside. It's probably one of the most gorgeous old post offices in Europe!!

    Oh, and you can buy stamps here as well ;-)

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  • Alex_71's Profile Photo

    Interesting

    by Alex_71 Written Oct 31, 2006

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    I suggest you spend some time here.It's a big office with lots of paintings about the history and the culture of Ireland.They make you understand the story of this beautiful country,and you can also see some interesting pieces of art.I think people can make a vist here and anyway it'll not take you lot of time.

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  • hevbell's Profile Photo

    THE GPO

    by hevbell Updated Oct 29, 2006

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    The General Post Office in the middle of busy O'Connell Street was where the 1916 Easter Rising began, with the leaders reading their proclamation from the front steps, and bullet holes can still be seen in the pillars outside. Of course it also serves as a busy post office still so you can stop off here to send your postcards! If you turn to the right once inside, to the philatelic [sp?] store, there are some cards on the wall that give some info about people involved in the Easter Rising etc

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  • IrishFem's Profile Photo

    General Post Office

    by IrishFem Updated Sep 27, 2005

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    GPO

    The GPO was built in 1818 on O'Connell Street by Francis Johnston. In 1916 an Irish Republic was proclaimed and a fire broke out as a result of the fighting. It was on the steps that the proclamation of Independence was read by the leaders of the rising. Most of the interior was destroyed by the flighting. In was renovated in 1929. The ceiling is spectacular and the inside contains a large area open postal hall. You can see shell marks of the 1916 rising. Admission is free and you can buy stamps. Lucky you... .

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  • cazz38's Profile Photo

    THE GENERAL POST OFFICE.

    by cazz38 Updated Aug 21, 2005

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The G.P.O

    The G.P.O is the main building on O'Connell street,built between 1815-1818.This was the headquarters of the 1916 Easter Rising, It was here that Patrick Pearse read aloud 'The Proclamation of the Irish Republic' and alongside James Connolly and some of the Irish Volunteers occupied the building for a week.It is still used as a post office and is worth going inside to have a look,we went in and bought some stamps.

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