Ha'penny Bridge, Dublin

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  • Ha'Penney Bridge
    Ha'Penney Bridge
    by Jim_Eliason
  • Ha'Penney Bridge
    Ha'Penney Bridge
    by Jim_Eliason
  • Ha'Penney Bridge
    Ha'Penney Bridge
    by Jim_Eliason
  • IrishFem's Profile Photo

    The Ha'penny Bridge

    by IrishFem Updated Jul 31, 2011

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    Ha'penny bridge
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    Situated on the River Liffey not far from O'Connell Street. This was Dublin's only pedestrian bridge up until the year 2000. For a 100 years Iit cost a half penny to cross it, now of course it's free. You can access the bridge through Temple Bar, its brings you over the north of the Liffey into Henry Street, another shopping area. You can also see the new boardwalks that have been recently built. It's nice to take a stroll or sit and read if the weather is good. Chances of that happening are pretty slim so do bring an umbrella with you..

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  • Airpunk's Profile Photo

    Ha'Penny Bridge

    by Airpunk Updated May 8, 2011

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    Ha'Penny Bridge at night

    This pedestrian bridge is not spectacular, but a nice sight with its iron cast arches and lamps. It opened in 1816 as “Wellington Bridge”, named after the Duke of Wellington. However, soon the name Ha’Penny Bridge established due to its toll amount of Half a Penny. Other names are “Triangle Bridge”, “Metal Bridge” (used for a short period some time ago) and “Liffey Bridge” (the official name no one uses). The toll was levied until 1919, but by then it had already increased. It was the first bridge in this area and remained the only pedestrian bridge over the Liffey in Dublin until the Millenium Birdge was opened. Today, it is a fast connection from the northern bank of the river Liffey to Temple bar and still in use by thousands of people daily. Unfortunately, it also attracts beggars and homeless alcoholics, but they usually don’t bother you.
    Come at night to take pictures of the bridge. The bridge is illuminated and makes a good motive for photographs.

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  • suvanki's Profile Photo

    Ha'penny Bridge and Merchants Arch

    by suvanki Updated Apr 8, 2011

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    The Ha'penny Bridge reflected in The River Liffey
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    This is my favourite bridge in Dublin, not just because I think it is the most attractive, but also because it has connections with Phil Lynott.

    This cast iron Bridge, officially known as the Liffey Bridge, links Temple Bar and Lower Liffey Street on the North Quays. Constructed in Shropshire, England, It was the first Iron bridge in Ireland. It was originally named the Wellington Bridge-after the Duke of Wellington, it was the only pedestrian bridge across the Liffey, until the Millennium Bridge was placed nearby in 2000.

    Prior to this way of crossing the river, seven ferries transported passengers between the two banks. These fell into disrepair, and were considered to be dangerous. The ferry owner was William Walsh, who was issued with an ultimatum -to repair/renew them or build a bridge. He chose the bridge option. One stipulation was that he was allowed to charge a toll to anyone crossing the bridge for the next One Hundred Years. The price was one half penny (Ha'Penny), as compensation for loss of earnings from his ferry fares. (Turnstyles were erected at either end of the bridge to collect the coins). Additionally, if the bridge and toll were objected to by the citizens of Dublin within the first year, it would be removed at no cost to the city.
    Well, it appears that the bridge was preferred to the old way of crossing the River, as it is still here! The toll was later increased to one and a half pennies. The toll was scrapped in 1919.

    Today, thousands of people use the bridge daily- local workers and tourists hurrying along, or stopping to take photos. It's also a popular spot for beggers, shaking a plastic cup hopeful of a few coins.
    The bridge was repaired, and given a lick of paint in 2001, when it was closed for a short while.

    Exiting at the Temple Bar side, you cross over into an arched entryway-This is Merchants Arch. (Named after the adjacent Merchants Hall) (pic 4) This is the only remaining covered archway into Temple Bar.

    Look up, just inside the entrance on the Left side, and you'll spot a disc. (pic 3 )

    This is one of the 'Rock N' Stroll Trail sites , and commemorates the event of Phil making one of his most famous videos 'Old Town' on the Ha' Penny Bridge.

    Other Dublin sites in the video include Ringsend, Grafton Street, The Long Hall Pub, the band stand in Herbert Park and Ringstead Pier.

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  • sue_stone's Profile Photo

    Ha'penny Bridge

    by sue_stone Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Ha'Penny Bridge

    The Liffey River disects the city of Dublin, and one of the most famous bridges that cross it is the Ha'penny Bridge.

    The Ha'penny is a pedestrian bridge that opened in 1816 as a toll bridge, hence the name. However it was originally known as the Wellington Bridge and the Triangle Bridge, at different stages in its history.

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  • Dabs's Profile Photo

    Ha'Penny Bridge

    by Dabs Updated Nov 29, 2009

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    Ha'Penny Bridge
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    As visually it's not really much to look at, I wouldn't say this was something you had to search for but at some point during your visit you will likely cross the pedestrian only Ha'Penny Bridge which extends from Temple Bar over the River Liffey.

    The official name of the bridge is the Wellington Bridge named after the Duke of Wellington, it's nickname comes from the half penny toll that was assessed on those crossing it from when it opened in 1816 to 1919 although the toll had increased by the time it closed. It was the only pedestrian only bridge over the Liffey in Dublin until 2000 when the Millennium Bridge was erected.

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  • Jefie's Profile Photo

    Dublin's most famous landmark

    by Jefie Written May 26, 2009

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    On the Ha'penny Bridge at dusk
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    Although there are over 20 bridges crossing the River Liffey, none is as popular as the Ha'penny Bridge. Built in 1816 and made of cast-iron, this narrow pedestrian bridge stretches elegantly over the River Liffey in downtown Dublin. It derives its name from the amount you had to pay (half a penny) to cross it when it was originally put into place - it remained a toll bridge until 1919. It is estimated that over 20,000 people cross the bridge daily and though most are people on their way to or from work, there is also a good amount of visitors getting their picture taken on the lovely white bridge. On the south side of the river, the Ha'penny Bridge leads to the Merchant's Arch, which is perhaps the nicest way to walk into the Temple Bar area (you need to make your way through a short, narrow alley which ends right in the middle of all the action at Temple Bar Square).

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  • Jase1177's Profile Photo

    Pay the Toll

    by Jase1177 Written May 23, 2009
    Ha'Penny Bridge
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    The Ha'Penny (Half Penny) is a pedestrian bridge over the River Liffey original built in the early 1800s. It cute easy sight to see in your strolls through Dublin center. It is nicknamed the Ha'Penny Bridged because its toll was a half-penny to cross. It takes only a minute or so to cross over at a standard pace, and provides a great shortcut from the Temple Bar to the North Quays. It is lit up at night, providing a pretty scene against the dark water of the river.

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  • rcsparty's Profile Photo

    Liffey Bridge

    by rcsparty Written May 9, 2009

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    The Ha' Penny bridge is actually named the Wellington Bridge, or more recently the Liffey Bridge. It links the Temple Bar area and Liffey Street, and once had a toll of a half penny to cross...hence the name. It was built in 1816, and the toll was charged until 1919. It was the only pedestrian bridge over the Liffey for almost 200 years. It is a must photo op in Dublin.

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  • Gypsystravels's Profile Photo

    Ha'penny Bridge

    by Gypsystravels Updated May 1, 2009

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    Officially known as the Liffey Bridge, the Ha’Penny Bridge (also called the Wellington Bridge and also referred to as the Metal Bridge) was opened in 1816 and got it’s curious nickname from the half penny toll that was levied on it until 1919.

    The bridge links Temple Bar and Liffey Street over the Liffy River and is made of cast iron. They bridge is quite attractive and recently restored to include some really nice period lanterns.

    The bridge is a big draw and it is probably one of the most photographed structures in Dublin, during our visit we crossed the bridge twice on our way to Temple Bar and we did notice a few beggars on both occasions with their hands stretched out.

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  • littlesam1's Profile Photo

    Ha'Penny Bridge over the River Liffey

    by littlesam1 Written Mar 26, 2009

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    Ha/Penny Bridge

    Officially its the Wellington Bridge, but is known as the Ha'Penny Bridge because historically that was the toll charged to cross the bridge. For many years the bridge was in bad condition and had been closed to pedestrian traffic. It has now been renovated to its original condition and open to the public. Mark and I both took time to photograph each other on the bridge. It was bit of Dublin history we wanted to include in our photos.

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  • mvtouring's Profile Photo

    Ha'penny Bridge

    by mvtouring Written Mar 14, 2009

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    As you drive next to the Liffey River which splits the city of Dublin, you will notice quite a number of bridges and pedestrin bridges linking the city. This one is one of the most famous bridges that cross it .

    The Ha'penny is a pedestrian bridge that opened in 1816 as a toll bridge, hence the name. However it was originally known as the Wellington Bridge and the Triangle Bridge, at different stages in its history

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  • Mikebb's Profile Photo

    Walk The Halfpenny Bridge - Liffey River

    by Mikebb Updated Mar 10, 2009

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    Halfpenny Bridge
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    The Ha'penny bridge was built in the year 1816 and connects the north and south sides of Dublin.

    The name comes from the toll charged to use the bridge to cross the Liffey River. It is a beautiful footbridge bridge which most tourists enjoy walking. You can take beautiful photos from the centre.

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  • call_me_rhia's Profile Photo

    Ha'penny bridge

    by call_me_rhia Written Aug 17, 2008

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    Ha'penny bridge
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    Ha'penny bridge is the short form of Half penny bridge - and even this one is not the official name of this quaint arched iron bridge... the real name, which very few people know (and no one uses) is today Liffey bridge. Liffey, of course, is the name of the river that flows through Dublin.

    It's the first bridge that was built in the city back in 1816. The only way to cross the river, before then, was by boarding one of the 7 ferries... all of them in bad condition. The owners of the ferry granted permission for a bridge to be built, provided that every person who used it, paid him half penny. The half penny toll remained in use until 1919.

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  • barryg23's Profile Photo

    Ha'penny Bridge

    by barryg23 Written Aug 23, 2007

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    Ha'penny Bridge
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    One of the most recognisable symbols of Dublin is the Ha’penny Bridge, a bridge across the River Liffey, build in the 18th century, and named after the old toll which was charged for crossing the river. Ha’peeny Bridge is not the official name for the bridge but the nickname has stuck and I don’t know anyone who refers to it as the Liffey Bridge.

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  • doug48's Profile Photo

    ha'penny bridge

    by doug48 Written Jul 7, 2007

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    ha'penny bridge

    this interesting cast iron pedestrian bridge was built by john windsor in 1816. it was originally named the wellington bridge but got it's nickname from the half penny toll to cross it. it is now called the leffey bridge.

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