Ha'penny Bridge, Dublin

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  • Ha'Penney Bridge
    Ha'Penney Bridge
    by Jim_Eliason
  • Ha'Penney Bridge
    Ha'Penney Bridge
    by Jim_Eliason
  • Ha'Penney Bridge
    Ha'Penney Bridge
    by Jim_Eliason
  • Crossing the Liffey

    by Mariajoy Written Feb 17, 2005

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    Everyone has to cross the Liffey via the Ha'penny Bridge at least once during their visit here. Up until 2000, when the Millenium Bridge was built , it was the only pedestrian bridge across the river. It once cost a halfpenny to get to the other side - I am sure if they could get away with it the city would now charge a few euros! They don't - it's free!

    It is very sweet and picturesque.

    The Ha'penny bridge The Bridge by night

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  • sue_stone's Profile Photo

    Ha'penny Bridge

    by sue_stone Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    The Liffey River disects the city of Dublin, and one of the most famous bridges that cross it is the Ha'penny Bridge.

    The Ha'penny is a pedestrian bridge that opened in 1816 as a toll bridge, hence the name. However it was originally known as the Wellington Bridge and the Triangle Bridge, at different stages in its history.

    Ha'Penny Bridge
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    Crowded but nice...

    by Henrik_rrb Written Aug 23, 2006

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    I had heard about Ha'penny Bridge from my dear VT-friend Marpessa before I went to Dublin. Hadn't though so much about it, but got very surprised when I understood I was living next to it...

    The bridge was the first one that was made to pass the River Liffy by foot. The name comes from the fact that it costed a half penny to pass over the bridge, although nowadays it's thankfully free to use. Would have been ruined otherwise with those prices... ;)

    It's quite different to other bridges in Dublin, since it's much less wide than the others, all white and with a nice design.
    From the middle, if you manage to stay put with all the people passing by around you, it's a nice view over the river. Although I would advise you to choose one of the other bridges for the view instead.

    It's always full, night and day, and sometimes it was actually a bit hard to pass over it without knocking someone down. Or at least without bumping into someone. To make it even more crowded there are also some beggars sitting at the end of it...

    So one might say it costs something to pass over the bridge also nowadays. :)

    The location of the bridge is great for entering the Temple Bar-area, from the bridge it's just about 75-100 meter to the zone.

    On the other side, on the Bachelors Walk, there is a really nice path where you can take a stroll, or sit down at one of the benches, looking at people or out over the river. There are also some small café shops where you can sit down and have an afternoon coffe in the sunshine.

    By night Ha'penny Bridge from close up. From the next bridge From the strolling path near by. Doesn't look so crowded,but wait until the evening
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    The gateway to Temple Bar

    by Cruefan Written Jun 3, 2005

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    From O'Connell Str the best way to get over the liffey to spend your moneyin Temple Bar is to walk over the Ha'penny Bridge. Years ago it cost a half penny to cross hence the name.

    It crosses the Liffey and takes you into the heart of Temple Bar.

    The Ha'Penny Bridge
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  • Mahieu's Profile Photo

    Ha'Penny Bridge

    by Mahieu Written Apr 29, 2004

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    Is this the symbol of Dublin or what?
    Like everyone else visiting Dublin, I also needed to take my very own picture of the bridge ;-)
    The Ha'Penny Bridge is officially called Wellington Bridge and was opened in 1816. It's got the name Ha'Penny Bridge because people crossing the bridge needed to pay half a penny during the old days. Looking at the amount of people crossing the bridge nowadays, you'll soon understand that this habit is no longer present!

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  • kentishgirl's Profile Photo

    Ha'Penny Bridge

    by kentishgirl Updated Oct 31, 2004

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    This is a great pedestrian bridge across the Liffey, they recently closed it and renovated it, its a pretty bridge and handy for crossing either side of the city!! Which was the main resaon they put it there!! Originally you had to pay half a penny to cross it!!

    Ha'Penny Bridge
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  • Ines28's Profile Photo

    Ha'penny Bridge

    by Ines28 Written Oct 13, 2004

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    This bridge is one of Dublin's most famous attractions. It connects the Temple Bar Quarter with the Liffey Street at the northern bank of the river. Thousands of people use this bridge, it is only for pedestrians. Built by John Windsor, an English steel constructor and opened in 1816, the name of the bridge was originally Wellington Bridge as an honor to the Duke of Wellington. Nowadays it is known under the name Liffey Bridge, but the popular nickname is Ha'penny Bridge, as every person had to pay half a penny to cross it until 1919. It has been recently restored and decorated with nostalgic street lanterns.

    Ha'penny Bridge
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  • Jefie's Profile Photo

    Dublin's most famous landmark

    by Jefie Written May 26, 2009

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    Although there are over 20 bridges crossing the River Liffey, none is as popular as the Ha'penny Bridge. Built in 1816 and made of cast-iron, this narrow pedestrian bridge stretches elegantly over the River Liffey in downtown Dublin. It derives its name from the amount you had to pay (half a penny) to cross it when it was originally put into place - it remained a toll bridge until 1919. It is estimated that over 20,000 people cross the bridge daily and though most are people on their way to or from work, there is also a good amount of visitors getting their picture taken on the lovely white bridge. On the south side of the river, the Ha'penny Bridge leads to the Merchant's Arch, which is perhaps the nicest way to walk into the Temple Bar area (you need to make your way through a short, narrow alley which ends right in the middle of all the action at Temple Bar Square).

    On the Ha'penny Bridge at dusk Ha'penny Bridge over the River Liffey

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    Ha'penny Bridge

    by MalenaN Written Mar 5, 2007

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    Ha’penny Bridge is a white pedestrian bridge going over River Liffey and it is probably the most photographed bridge in Dublin. The name of the bridge is actually Liffey Bridge, but it’s always referred to as Ha’penny Bridge, a name it got because of the toll of one half penny that had to be paid to cross it. The bridge was built in 1816 and a toll had to be paid to cross it until 1919 (but then the toll was more than a half penny).

    Ha'penny Bridge at night River Liffey and Ha'penny Bridge
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  • Buckz's Profile Photo

    City Centre Tour III (Ha penny bridge)

    by Buckz Updated Apr 6, 2006

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    cont'd
    On the right of the GPO is Henry St a pedestrian street, proceed down here, (no shopping!)
    A short distance down on your right is Moore St (Henry Moore, Earl of Drogheda wanted to be remembered, so he left his name on the Dublin Map, You are looking at Moore St from Henry St. Earl St is the far side of the spike, and Drogheda St no longer exists.He even named a street Of Lane!) Step briefly onto Moore street, to get some fruit, fish or flowers and continue along Henry St. Take the next street on your left (not the sheltered Arcade!) go straight through the (sort of) cross roads. At the end of this street you see the bag ladies, and depending on the day and time maybe a some more street trading.

    Now the dilemma- will you cross the Ha'Penny bridge- one of the city's most famous landmarks- or walk along the board walk (one of the city's best recent additions)? The choice is yours, but in either case, continue go up stream (right) past the Millennium Bridge (flat, metal) and onto Grattan Bridge (Capel st to the locals.)

    Ha penny Bridge

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  • Mikebb's Profile Photo

    Walk The Halfpenny Bridge - Liffey River

    by Mikebb Updated Mar 10, 2009

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    The Ha'penny bridge was built in the year 1816 and connects the north and south sides of Dublin.

    The name comes from the toll charged to use the bridge to cross the Liffey River. It is a beautiful footbridge bridge which most tourists enjoy walking. You can take beautiful photos from the centre.

    Halfpenny Bridge Halfpenny Bridge - Walk Over The Liffey River
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  • IrishFem's Profile Photo

    The Ha'penny Bridge

    by IrishFem Updated Jul 31, 2011

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    Situated on the River Liffey not far from O'Connell Street. This was Dublin's only pedestrian bridge up until the year 2000. For a 100 years Iit cost a half penny to cross it, now of course it's free. You can access the bridge through Temple Bar, its brings you over the north of the Liffey into Henry Street, another shopping area. You can also see the new boardwalks that have been recently built. It's nice to take a stroll or sit and read if the weather is good. Chances of that happening are pretty slim so do bring an umbrella with you..

    Ha'penny bridge Another view
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  • kenbac's Profile Photo

    Ha'penny Bridge

    by kenbac Written Sep 11, 2003

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    This is a magnificent metal pedestrian bridge over the River Liffey.
    Tradition has it, that it oiginally cost one half penny to cross it.
    It has recently been refurbished to a superb condition by Dublin City Council.
    Try to see it after dark.

    Ha'penny Bridge

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  • doug48's Profile Photo

    ha'penny bridge

    by doug48 Written Jul 7, 2007

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    this interesting cast iron pedestrian bridge was built by john windsor in 1816. it was originally named the wellington bridge but got it's nickname from the half penny toll to cross it. it is now called the leffey bridge.

    ha'penny bridge
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  • Pieter11's Profile Photo

    Ha'Penny Bridge

    by Pieter11 Written Jul 4, 2007

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    In the centre of the city of Dublin, as a connection between the north and the south of the river Liffey, you will find the small and beautiful Ha’Penny Bridge. It is a white, narrow pedestrian bridge that was built in 1816. It originally was called “Wellington Bridge”, named after an Englsih duke, but since the Irish people are not so positive about english heroes, it was soon called “Metal Bridge” or “Ha’Penny Bridge”. This last name, because the fee to cross the bridge always was half a penny. This last name remained the name until today.

    What is interesting to see from the bridge, are the positions of both the north- and the southbank of the Liffey. Both sides of the city are positioned with their “backs” towards the river. Almost all the buildings at the riverside are built with the back of houses facing the Liffey. This indicates how different the both sides of the city are: they are not even facing eachother. The Ha’Penny Bridge is a nice connection between these both sides though.

    The Ha'Penny Bridge by night The Ha'Penny Bridge by daytime
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