Liffey Bridges, Dublin

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  • Bridge on the Liffey
    Bridge on the Liffey
    by Goner
  • Bridge on the Liffey
    Bridge on the Liffey
    by Goner
  • Bridge on the Liffey
    Bridge on the Liffey
    by Goner
  • orlikins's Profile Photo

    River Liffey

    by orlikins Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Boardwalks on River Liffey

    The River Liffey flows through the heart of Dublin.

    It's the dividing line between the North and South sides of the city.

    It is not that big or impressive in comparison to the Thames, Seine, or even the Shannon.

    It rises in the North Wicklow mountains and enters the sea at Dublin Bay. The sea tides reach up as far back as Heuston station.
    It was renowned for its pungent stink, but thankfully, it has cleaned up now... it used to be seriously disgusting!!! :)

    During the summer, you can take a canoe out on the river, downstream while it flows through Co. Kildare. (The Liffey Descent Event).
    In the city centre, there are now boardwalks along the river.

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel

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  • DrexelDragon's Profile Photo

    Walk the Liffey and its bridges

    by DrexelDragon Updated Apr 4, 2011
    Looking west from O'Connell St. Bridge.

    Definitely stroll along the Liffey River and its many bridges, most notably, the O'Connell St. Bridge. Check the weblink below. You get a good feel for Dublin this way in my estimation, and a feel for your bearings of what's where in town. You can relate a location to the nearest bridge.

    Related to:
    • Backpacking
    • Study Abroad
    • Budget Travel

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  • Goner's Profile Photo

    So Many Bridges

    by Goner Updated Sep 14, 2010

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    Bridge on the Liffey
    2 more images

    I was totally fascinated by how many bridges spanned the Liffey River in the City of Dublin. It seems every street is blessed with one and some standing since the 1700's. I saw many of them from our off-and-on-bus, but couldn't keep up the names as they were announced. I probably didn't see all of them anyway, so here is a list.

    Bridges over the River Liffey in Greater Dublin, from east to west.

    East-Link Briegeridge
    Samuel Beckett Bridge
    Seán O'Casey Bridge
    Talbot Memorial Bridge
    Loopline Bridge
    Butt Bridge (I especially like this name)
    O'Connell Bridge
    Liffey Bridge known at Ha’Penny Bridge
    Grattan Bridge
    O'Donovan Rossa Bridge
    Fr. Mathew Bridge
    Mellows Bridge
    James Joyce Bridge
    Rory O'More Bridge
    Frank Sherwin Bridge
    Seán Heuston Bridge
    Liffey Railway Bridge
    Island Bridge
    Anna Livia Bridge
    Farmleigh Bridge
    West-Link Bridge
    Lucan Bridge

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits

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  • millablake's Profile Photo

    The Liffey

    by millablake Updated Nov 20, 2006

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    The Liffey divides the south of dublin city from the northside.

    The Ha'penny bridge so called because it used to cost half a penny to cross.

    -------------------------------------------

    That there, that's not me
    I go where I please
    I walk through walls
    I float down the Liffey

    —'How To Disappear Completely'
    Radiohead, Kid A

    -------------------------------------------

    Related to:
    • Architecture

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  • Mikebond's Profile Photo

    River Liffey

    by Mikebond Updated Apr 14, 2006

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    River Liffey

    The Liffey is the river that cross Dublin before flowing into the Irish Sea in the Dublin Bay. It is quite short (around 125 kms). Actually, it is not an attraction to visit, but it is important like any other river of a big city. For more information about the river, visit the site below.

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  • travelife's Profile Photo

    River Liffy and the bridges 9

    by travelife Updated Aug 21, 2004

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    River Liffy and the bridges

    As elsewhere along the Quays, the river is overlooked by Georgian style facades in various styles, heights and colours along 'Bacelor's Walk'. Most date from the 18th century but a few are recently built.

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    River Liffy and the bridges 3

    by travelife Updated Aug 21, 2004

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    River Liffy and the bridges

    Wooden sidewalk covering part of the river gives relaxing walking and view for few minutes.

    This is known as 'Bachelor's Walk' which extends along the north side of the Liffey from O'Connell Street. Around the millennium a boardwalk was built above the water.

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    River Liffy and the bridges 6

    by travelife Updated Aug 21, 2004

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    River Liffy and the bridges

    Dublin Father Matthew Bridge. This bridge was first opened in 1818 and was named after Lord Lieutenant Charles Earl of Whitworth. It was later renamed after Father Matthew who campaigned for abstinence from alcohol. The gently curving bridge with balustrade and three spans is very similar to O'Donovan Rossa, the next bridge down the Liffey.

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  • travelife's Profile Photo

    River Liffy and the bridges 5

    by travelife Updated Aug 21, 2004

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    River Liffy and the bridges 5

    The Four Courts are situated between Fr Matthew Bridge and O'Donovan Rossa Bridge overlooking the River Liffey. The building was designed by James Gandon, Dublin's most famous architect of the late 18th early 19th century period.

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    River Liffy and the bridges 4

    by travelife Updated Aug 21, 2004

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    Dublin Rory O'More Bridge. Opened in 1860 as the Victoria Bridge, it was renamed in 1922 after a leader of the uprising of 1641. Inscribed on the arch the words: Robert Daglish Junr St Helens Foundry Lancashire.

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    River Liffy and the bridges 2

    by travelife Updated Aug 21, 2004

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    River Liffy and the bridges

    Sunsets along the River Liffey are often spectacular, as the river flows directly from the east. Here at a cloudy evening in December we see a distant view of Ha Penny bridge and the surroundings reflected on the water.

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    River Liffy and the bridges 1

    by travelife Updated Aug 21, 2004

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    River Liffy and the bridges 1

    Dublin Ha'penny Bridge was opened in 1816 and originally named the Wellington Bridge. It became known affectionately as the Ha'penny bridge on account of the toll of 1/2d which was charged to cross it. The metal bridge with its gentle arc and three lanterns is a symbol of Dublin

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  • Lochlainn's Profile Photo

    The Liffey Swim

    by Lochlainn Updated Jun 19, 2003

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    The Liffey Swim
    An annual event since 1924 held in late August / early September on a Saturday when hundreds of Dubliners, after experiencing a typical Dublin Summer, decide they can't get any wetter and embark on a marathon swim down the Liffey river, thereby demonstrating that either a) the Liffey isn't half as polluted as some people claim or b) that a lifetime of drinking stout works wonders for the immune system! Either way it's great craic (to watch!). Those less inclined to the aquatic pursuits may enjoy the pleasure of viewing Jack B Yeats' famous depiction of the first such event held, hanging in Dublin's National Art Gallery.

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    River Liffy and the bridges 7

    by travelife Updated Aug 21, 2004

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    River Liffy and the bridges

    The water of Liffy visbily goes up and down due to high and low tide as it is close to it mouth open to the sea.

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