Molly Malone Statue, Dublin

3.5 out of 5 stars 21 Reviews

Been here? Rate It!

hide
  • Molly Malone Statute
    Molly Malone Statute
    by Jim_Eliason
  • Molly Malone Statue
    by MalenaN
  • Molly Malone Statue
    Molly Malone Statue
    by suvanki
  • solopes's Profile Photo

    Molly Malone

    by solopes Updated May 20, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Molly Malone, Fernanda and the harp

    I love Molly Malone!

    No, I'm not exactly talking about the lady. As a matter of fact, we really don't know who she was - a fishmonger, a prostitute, or just a name.

    I was talking about the song with her name, which is one of the best melodies to listen in front of a Guinness mug (I don't drink beer, but in Dublin I forgot it, of course).

    Imagine my satisfaction when I met her in a street. She looks healthy, generous, and a music lover like me.

    Cheers, Molly!

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • suvanki's Profile Photo

    Statues of Dublin-Molly Malone

    by suvanki Written Dec 28, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Molly Malone Statue

    One of Dublins best known/most photographed statues - of the fictional Molly Malone - who is commemorated in the well known song of 'In Dublins Fair City' (also known as Molly Malone or Cockles and Mussels) which is the unofficial anthem of Dublin, and has subsequently been adopted by supporters of various soccer and Rugby teams in Ireland and the UK.
    Click here for the lyrics

    The legend is that Molly was a fish monger by day and prostitute by night, who died at a young age of a fever in the 17th Century. There is no historical evidence that Molly existed - although this was quite a common name in Dublin, and the Dublin Millenium Commission, decreed in 1988, that there was 'substantial evidence' of a Molly Malone who died on 13th June 1699, and henceforth decreed that 13th June was to be "Molly Malone day".(300 years after her alleged demise)

    The impressive statue was designed by Jeanne Rynhart (From Bantry, Co. Cork), to celebrate the city's first millennium in 1988. It was unveiled by the Lord Mayor of Dublin, Alderman Ben Briscoe. During the unveiling ceremony Jean sang the famous ditty, along with The Dubliners!
    When casting the bronze statue, 2 copies of the head were made 'in case there was a problem'. Both heads were successfully cast, and the spare was put to auction in June 2011

    As is tradition in Dublin today, the statues of the city receive nick names - so Molly is known variably as 'The Tart with the cart', 'The trollop with the scallops', 'The dish with the fish', 'The flirt with the skirt' and 'The Dolly with the trolley'

    This statue is usually accompanied by visitors scrambling to have their photo taken, or with others taking a breather, so you have to be quick to get an 'uncluttered' photo - As you can see, it's also a bike parking stop.

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Airpunk's Profile Photo

    Molly Malone

    by Airpunk Updated May 8, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Molly Malone
    2 more images

    The Molly Malone bronze sculpture is one of Dublin’s most popular sights. It was inspired by the song of the same name, which is also known under the name of “Cockles and Mussles” and “In Dublin’s Fair City”. It was designed by Jeanne Rynhart and place unveiled in 1988 as part of the Dublin Millenium celebrations.
    Like the spire, she has earned several nicknames like “the tart with the cart” or the “the dolley with the trolley”. However, unlike the spire, she is beloved by Dublin citizen and tourists alike.

    Related to:
    • Photography

    Was this review helpful?

  • don1dublin's Profile Photo

    Dublins famous Molly Malone

    by don1dublin Updated Apr 4, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Molly Malone......known to Dublins as " the tart with the cart"

    For someone who trod this Earth for so brief a period, the youngest daughter of two fishmongers named Patrick and Colleen Malone had a far greater impact on those who knew her, and many who did not, than almost anyone else who had ever lived in the seedy waterfront neighborhoods of Dublin during the early part of the 19th century.

    In fact, so great was the outpouring of grief at the funeral of young Molly Malone, struck down by a fever as she blossomed into full womanhood, that the pubs for sixteen miles in every direction were obliged to stay open around the clock for three days following the sad event. Indeed, the reason for this unprecedented communal agony was summed up neatly by the epitaph engraved on the simple stone that graced her final resting place

    Was this review helpful?

  • mvtouring's Profile Photo

    Molly Malone

    by mvtouring Written Nov 3, 2010

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Most definately the best known lady in Ireland and also the most photographed. The Molly Malone statue in Grafton Street was unveiled by then Lord Mayor of Dublin, Alderman Ben Briscoe during the 1988 Dublin Millennium celebrations, declaring June 13 as Molly Malone Day.
    Molly Malone is based on a character of a song by the same name which tells the fictional tale of a beautiful fishmonger who plied her trade on the streets of Dublin, but who died young, of a fever. In 2010, a theory spread that there was a historical Molly, who lived in the 17th century. She is typically represented as a hawker by day and part-time prostitute by night. In contrast she has also been portrayed as one of the few chaste female street-hawkers of her day. However, there is no evidence that the song is based on a real woman, of the 17th century or at any other time.

    Was this review helpful?

  • lina112's Profile Photo

    Molly Malone

    by lina112 Written Apr 3, 2009

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    According to Irish legend, lived in good old Dublin Molly Malone who was on these winding streets advocating "¡Cockles and Mussels alive!" pushing a cart by the port area of the city of Dublin. All the residents were in high esteem and all who knew her family had been devoted to the sale of fresh fish ever since.

    One day Molly Malone died of fever in the street without being able to do anything for her, a death that was the beginning of the legend that has remained in the form of traditional Irish song on everyone's mind in a way not Molly Malone has been forgotten by any Irish.

    Many argue that Irish Molly Malone had another life and what to sell shellfish alive in the streets was just a metaphor for her prostitution. Is the case or not, Molly Malone is known to all the Irish in Dublin and especially dear.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • littlesam1's Profile Photo

    Molly Malone

    by littlesam1 Written Mar 26, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    One of the first sights I saw my first day walking through Dublin was the statue of Molly Malone. The statue is in memory of the heroine of the old folk song Cockles and Muscles. Although I always had a romantic view of the folk song we were told by a lady on the street that the Molly in the folk song was not quite a saint. Just take a look at the way she is dressed in the statue we were told. She was the Tart with the Cart. We had a good laugh out of the description and a new view of the old folk song.

    The Statue is located corner of Grafton Street and Suffolk Street.

    Was this review helpful?

  • Mikebb's Profile Photo

    Molly Malone Statute

    by Mikebb Written Mar 11, 2009

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Molly Malone Statute
    1 more image

    Something not to be missed at the top of Grafton Street is the statute designed by Jeanne Rynhart, erected to celebrate the city's first millennium in 1987. Sometimes known by locals as "The Tart with the Cart" in 17th century dress Molly was a fishmonger and some say doubled as a Lady of The Night.

    Always a crowd around the statute and well worth visiting as there are often many modern day "Mollys" by the statute.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Budget Travel
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • WanderingFinn's Profile Photo

    The Molly Malone statue

    by WanderingFinn Written Sep 2, 2008
    The statue of Molly Malone, Grafton Street, Dublin

    Most people regocnize "Molly Malone" from the song, which has become an unofficial national anthem of Ireland (..."Alive, alive, oh", crying "cockles and mussels, alive, alive, oh"...). Several sports teams use already this song as their supporting song.

    Molly Malone was a beautiful fishmonger who traded on the streets of Dublin. She lived in teh 17th century most probably, and died young, of a fever. Some stories tell that she would have been a prostitute at nighttime. There may be several urban legends on her.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Kushelkitten's Profile Photo

    Pay a vist to Molly Malone

    by Kushelkitten Written May 13, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Molly Malone

    I must have missed her my first walk through the area and after I did spot her it is understandable why. Every tourist who comes to Dublin obvously wants their picture taken with the young lady of the famous song. I was lucky to snap this photo between waves of tourists jumping on base to be near her.

    Related to:
    • Music
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • MalenaN's Profile Photo

    Statue of Molly Malone

    by MalenaN Updated Mar 8, 2007

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Molly Malone in Dublin
    1 more image

    I had heard the name Molly Malone before but could not exactly say what she was famous for. Now I know that she was not a real person but is a beautiful fishmonger sang of in Dublin’s unofficial anthem, and she died because of fever.

    The statue of Molly Malone is designed by Jeanne Rynhart and was erected to celebrate Dublin’s millennium in 1988. She is wearing a 17th century dress and is standing with a cart at the bottom of Grafton Street, near Trinity College.

    Was this review helpful?

  • SabrinaSummerville's Profile Photo

    Visit Molly Malone

    by SabrinaSummerville Written Aug 23, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Statue of Molly Malone

    Molly Malone was a rather infamous Irish woman who lived in Dublin in the late 1600's. By day she walked the streets selling cockles and mussels and by night she was, well, a lady of the night.

    A song was written about Molly which is now sung all over the world and is recognised as the unofficial anthem of Dublin City. It's called "Cockles and Mussels Alive Alive Oh".

    A statue of Molly has been erected at the junction of Grafton Street and Suffolk Street, just across from the main entrance to Trinity College University. It is hardly a coincidence that the stories say the students of Trinity were some of Molly's best night customers! Molly was renowned to be very well endowed, and it's a classic pose for male tourists to pose by the statue with their hands hugging her boobs! Makes a fun holiday pic alright.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • SanguiniA's Profile Photo

    St Andrew's Church

    by SanguiniA Written May 18, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    St. Andrew's Church
    3 more images

    Huh, in this church there is a Tourist Information Centre - this is really a first in my travels ... weird ... But anyway, the church looks great from outside and inside, apart from some good info, there is a very well-stocked souvenier shop (but no stamps for the postcards ...)

    Related to:
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • sparkieplug24's Profile Photo

    Molly Mallone

    by sparkieplug24 Updated Mar 1, 2006

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    molly mallone

    The Molly Mallone statue is at the end of Grafton Street. Molly Mallone features in the famous Dublin song about cockles and mussles. The statue was renamed by locals as the tart with the cart. This is because the story goes that at night Molly used to walk the streets in the trinity college area as a prostitute.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • jo104's Profile Photo

    Molly Malone

    by jo104 Written Sep 29, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Molly is at the bottom of Grafton Street, affectionately known as "the tart with a cart"

    The statue portrays Molly as a busty young woman in seventeenth-century dress, and is claimed to represent the real person on whom the song is based. Her low-cut dress and large breasts were justified on the grounds that as women breastfed publicly in Molly's time, breasts were popped out all over the place

    An urban legend has grown up around the figure of the historical Molly who has been presented variously as a hawker by day and part-time prostitute by night, or, in contrast, as one of the few female street-hawkers of her day who was chaste

    Thanks to Mariajoy for the photo, it was so busy around the statue it was impossible for me to take a decent one

    In Dublin's fair city,
    where the girls are so pretty,
    I first set my eyes on sweet Molly Malone,
    As she wheeled her wheel-barrow,
    Through streets broad and narrow,
    Crying, "Cockles and mussels, alive alive oh!"

    "Alive-a-live-oh,
    Alive-a-live-oh",
    Crying "Cockles and mussels, alive alive oh".

    Now she was a fishmonger,
    And sure 'twas no wonder,
    For so were her mother and father before,
    And they each wheeled their barrow,
    Through streets broad and narrow,
    Crying, "Cockles and mussels, alive, alive oh!"

    (chorus)

    She died of a fever,
    And no one could save her,
    And that was the end of sweet Molly Malone.
    Now her ghost wheels her barrow,
    Through streets broad and narrow,
    Crying, "Cockles and mussels, alive, alive oh!"

    (chorus)

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Dublin

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

71 travelers online now

Comments

Hotels Near Molly Malone Statue
4.5 out of 5 stars
2 Reviews
0 miles away
Show Prices
3.5 out of 5 stars
4 Reviews
0.1 miles away
Show Prices
4.0 out of 5 stars
3 Reviews
0.1 miles away
Show Prices

View all Dublin hotels