O'Connell Street, Dublin

3.5 out of 5 stars 35 Reviews

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  • O'Connel Street
    O'Connel Street
    by Jim_Eliason
  • O'Connel Street
    O'Connel Street
    by Jim_Eliason
  • O'Connel Street
    O'Connel Street
    by Jim_Eliason
  • doug48's Profile Photo

    o'connell monument

    by doug48 Updated Jul 7, 2007

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    pictured is the daniel o' connell monument on o' connell street. o' connell street is in the heart of the commercial area of dublin. o' connell was born in 1775 and is known as the "liberator" of irish catholics. he was a lawyer who was active in the movement to repeal laws that penalized catholics. in 1823 he organised the catholic association which played an important role in the passage of the catholic emancipation act of 1829. in 1832 o' connell was elected MP for dublin.

    o' connell monument
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  • Pieter11's Profile Photo

    O'Connell Street

    by Pieter11 Written Jul 3, 2007

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    The heart of the capital is the wide O’Connell Street at the northern bank of the river Liffey. This street is not only the most important traffic connection in the city, but it is also the most important shopping street of the city and the whole country.

    What makes O’Connell Street so very special especially is the width of the street. At the widest point it is 49 metres wide which makes it one of the widest ones in Europe. It has car- and bus lanes in both directions and wide pedestrians areas at both sides of the road as well as in the middle. Along these pedestrian strips you can find luxurious hotels, shops, and restaurants as well as fast-food restaurants and souvenir shops.

    The street, as well as the bridge at the end of it, is named after Daniel O’Connell, an Irish nationalistic leader who lived in the 19th century. His statue is placed at the riverside of its street. Another important monument on O’Connell Street is the 120 meters high Millennium Spire in the middle that was placed here in 2003, as an honour to the new millennium.

    Almost all busses that go through the city pass through O’Connell Street, and when you come from the airport you will surely pass the street. A lot of buildings in the street itself was heavily “damaged” due to renovating works in the past century, but as soon as you enter the streets in its neighbourhood, you will be able to imagine what it used to look like.

    O'Connell Street with the Millennium Spire A Sinn Fein protest at O'Connell Street A view of O'Connell Street An old clock at O'Connell Street
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  • MichaelFalk1969's Profile Photo

    O`Connell Street and Bridge

    by MichaelFalk1969 Updated Jun 25, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The best-known street in Dublin with lots of historical buildings and monuments (and shops). In the Post Office the Leaders of the Easter Rising 1916 made their last stand. It leads to O`Connell bridge, where you are in walking distance to the Old Customs House, the historic center, Trinity College and Halfpenny Bridge.

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  • Alex_71's Profile Photo

    A street for shopping

    by Alex_71 Written Oct 31, 2006

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    Well O'Connel street didn't gave me a very good impression.I think it's a good place where you can make shopping(as tourist) but it's not far from the train station and expecially during evening and night it doesn't seem the best place where to walk(expecially for girls alone).The street is very chaotic and there is really too much noise(to tell the truth they were making some jobs on the street too).So considering all,i can suggest to pass from here(better during day),but it's for sure not the most beautiful place of Dublin

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  • SanguiniA's Profile Photo

    O' Connell Street

    by SanguiniA Written May 16, 2006

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Sorting through the pics I could not remember where this place is .... in comes the use of the millenium spire!! It helped me identify the street :-) Anyway, here - more shopping, and many statues of Irish heroes

    O Connel Street with the infamous spire ....

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  • Rojo72's Profile Photo

    The largest street in Dublin

    by Rojo72 Written Jan 27, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    O'Connell Street, named (as so many other streets and places in Dublin) after an Irish independence hero, is the largest street in Dublin. Unfortunately it's not a pedestrial zone like Grafton Street but it is still nice. There are quite a large number of shops and restaurants along the street, but most importantly there are some monuments of O'Connell and Parnell and also the Spike, the modern pride (or shame) of Dublin. Built for the turn of the millenium it's a very tall...hmmm...spike I suppose in the middle of O'Connell street. A perfect meeting point visible over large parts of Dublin. Stand under it and look up and feel how the spike seems to "bend" over your head.

    The cross-street to O'Connell Street at the Spike is Henry Street, one of the shopping streets in Dublin with malls, shops and restaurants. Some pubs nearby too, as there always are...

    The SPike at O'Connel Street

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  • Cruefan's Profile Photo

    Daniel O'Connell Momument

    by Cruefan Written Jun 6, 2005

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    Dan O'Connell was known as the Liberator for his agressive fight for Irish home rule and democracy as a whole. He died in Rome in 1847, and per his instructions had his heart buried in Rome but his body in Dublin.

    The O'Connell statue stands at the beginning of the street made after him and the bridge named after him as well. I found that when we were going to meet up with anyone that the O'Connell statue wa a great place because everyone in Dublin knows where it is.

    O'Connell

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  • elcolibri's Profile Photo

    O Connell Street

    by elcolibri Written May 24, 2005

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    O Connell Street is the most famous and important street in Dublin. Formerly known Drogheda Street by the Earls of Drogheda who developed it , and later as Sackville Street has the today name after Daniel O'Connell, the Liberator, after the independence in 1922. The central mall of the Street contains many statues from the impressionant O'Connell Monument to others who have played a rol in Dublin and Ireland's development as: Sir John Gray (1816-75) who fights for bringing a water supply to Dublin ; Fr Theobold Mathew (1790-1856), a bishop who founded the Temperance movement; and the labour leaders and trade unionists William Smith O'Brien (1803-64) and James Larkin (1876-1947) . The most modern monument in O'Connell Street is the Dublin Spire built to replace Nelson's Pillar in front of the Post Office.
    O'Connell Street also has a lot of important building as the General Post Office, the Dublin Bus Building, the Gresham Hotel and many shops ending in O Connell Bridge.

    O Connell Street

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  • kimod74's Profile Photo

    O'Connell Street Bridge-Smelly River!

    by kimod74 Updated Apr 29, 2005

    O'Connell Street Bridge is a monument/bridge that you just have to see when you visit Dublin. We were walking around and crossed over it and decided to take a picture. The water is kind of stinky though, I wouldn't recommend a swim..:)

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  • DemonTraitor's Profile Photo

    Shop till you drop

    by DemonTraitor Written Feb 27, 2005

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    This is the place to go wandering through when visiting Dublin. Not only does it have its own landmark (a 200 foot spire) so you do not get lost, it is also a hive of activity.

    There are literally hundreds of shops of all sorts. But you must visit Carrols Irish gift shop, you will find everything Irish related in their, and the shop also contains an internal Guinness Shop - for everything Guinness related (really?)

    The spire in the centre - which the locals call "The Stiletto in the Ghetto" is pretty amazing. It is made from polished metal - but we noticed in cold weather and the sun is not on it, it looks just like concrete!

    It looks like every bus in Ireland passes through O'Connell street, so if you are after a bus - start here.

    It is worth trying to explorer every street coming off O'Connell, as there are loads to see.

    One thing O'Connell street does not seem to be short of (apart from buses) are Internet Cafe's. There is literally one every other shop. Most are around 1 euro per hour.

    Looking up O'Connell Street from the River
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  • kentishgirl's Profile Photo

    O Connell Street

    by kentishgirl Updated Oct 31, 2004

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    O Connell Streer is the main throughfare in Dublin, and houses tons of shops, banks and historical sights, including the GPO (General Post Office), the new Spire and various statues......However when I visited in March the place looked dreadful, they are undertaking so much work it just looks a real mess at the moment! Hopefully the work will be completed soon and it will be back to the scenic street that it once was!!

    Work on O Connell Street
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  • sarahandgareth's Profile Photo

    Dublin's central boulevard

    by sarahandgareth Updated Aug 6, 2004

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Right now - summer 2004 - O'Connell Street still looks like a bit of a construction site, with work on the new tram system, the Luas, disrupting both car and foot traffic, and making some side streets, especially Middle Abbey Street, partially impassable. But it's improving rapidly and it's well worth persisting, because O'Connell Street is one of Dublin's essential thoroughfares, even if it's seen much better days. There's little of the glamour of the Champs-Elysées here: some of the storefronts, especially the bag shop in a former cinema, are distinctly tatty, but O'Connell Street is home to the General Post Office, the GPO, a key point of pilgrimage for anyone interested in Ireland's independence struggle, since it was the symbolic heart of the Easter Rising in 1916. The street itself is filled with statues of important figures in 19th and early twentieth century Irish history: Daniel O'Connell, at the Liffey end of the street, further up 'Big' Jim Larkin, and at the top, where the street becomes Parnell Square, Charles Stewart Parnell. The new crowning glory is of course the Spire, originally the Millennium Spire, but delayed until 2003 because of planning disputes. It's one of those things that you have to see, if only to be able to make up your mind about it. Some local wits quickly dubbed it the Spike, which may tell you something about its appearance!

    O'Connell Street

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  • ChrsStrl's Profile Photo

    O'Connell Street

    by ChrsStrl Written Jul 30, 2004

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    This wide bustling shopping street is north of the Liffey. Personally I found it disappointing for such an historic place. Two monuments dominate the street - nearest the bridge is Daniel O'Connell himself who achieved Catholic emancipation, and at the other end a hero of mine, Charles Stewart Parnell, who so nearly achieved home rule. In the middle is a Millenium sculpture - the fine needle. In it is the General Post Office of which more later.

    Parnell's Memorial
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  • C.GOROSTIAGA's Profile Photo

    O'CONNELL STREET.

    by C.GOROSTIAGA Updated Apr 22, 2004

    The banks of the river Liffey have held settlements for thousands of years. Danish Vikings founded a fortified town they called Dubh Linn, "the black pool". Dublin celebrated its millennium in 1988. The city's Celtic origin still rings in the Irish name: Baile Atha Cliath, "the town of the hurdle ford".
    Dublin is a European metropolis, but whereas most other capitals have expanded into inhuman proportions, Dublin is still friendly and easy accessible. You may get around on foot, from the famous O'Connell Bridge, connecting the north districts with the throbbing city centre, to the dignified Trinity College, the busy shops on Grafton Street and the lush St Stephen's Green.
    You may eat dishes from the entire world, you may look at the most precious artefacts, you may buy books and records, and anything you want is available. Wherever you may go, you'll be delighted to feel the living pulse of the city, and you'll meet friendly people who still may offer you a smile.

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  • kiona's Profile Photo

    Main street

    by kiona Written Dec 2, 2003

    O'Connell's street is a main street in Duublin. Its quite nice, and by my experience everything worth seeing / doing is nearby it. Just hop on a city tour bus and do the tour. You'll see EVERYTHING...

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