O'Connell Street, Dublin

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  • O'Connel Street
    O'Connel Street
    by Jim_Eliason
  • O'Connel Street
    O'Connel Street
    by Jim_Eliason
  • O'Connel Street
    O'Connel Street
    by Jim_Eliason
  • Cruefan's Profile Photo

    Daniel O'Connell Momument

    by Cruefan Written Jun 6, 2005

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    O'Connell

    Dan O'Connell was known as the Liberator for his agressive fight for Irish home rule and democracy as a whole. He died in Rome in 1847, and per his instructions had his heart buried in Rome but his body in Dublin.

    The O'Connell statue stands at the beginning of the street made after him and the bridge named after him as well. I found that when we were going to meet up with anyone that the O'Connell statue wa a great place because everyone in Dublin knows where it is.

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  • kentishgirl's Profile Photo

    O Connell Street

    by kentishgirl Updated Oct 31, 2004

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    Work on O Connell Street

    O Connell Streer is the main throughfare in Dublin, and houses tons of shops, banks and historical sights, including the GPO (General Post Office), the new Spire and various statues......However when I visited in March the place looked dreadful, they are undertaking so much work it just looks a real mess at the moment! Hopefully the work will be completed soon and it will be back to the scenic street that it once was!!

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  • Mikebb's Profile Photo

    The Spire - World's Tallest Monument

    by Mikebb Updated Mar 13, 2009

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    The Spire, O'Connell Street, Dublin
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    The Spire known as the Monument of Light is a new addition to O'Connell Street. It is a stainless steel, conical spire which tapers from a 3 metre diameter base to a 10 cm pointed tip of optical glass at a height of 120 metres.

    On the days we visited the sky was overcast and our photos do not capture the spire at its best.

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  • doug48's Profile Photo

    o'connell monument

    by doug48 Updated Jul 7, 2007

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    o' connell monument

    pictured is the daniel o' connell monument on o' connell street. o' connell street is in the heart of the commercial area of dublin. o' connell was born in 1775 and is known as the "liberator" of irish catholics. he was a lawyer who was active in the movement to repeal laws that penalized catholics. in 1823 he organised the catholic association which played an important role in the passage of the catholic emancipation act of 1829. in 1832 o' connell was elected MP for dublin.

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  • Buckz's Profile Photo

    City Centre Tour I

    by Buckz Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Children of Lir

    You are standing at the Spike (On O'Connell St) So tick that off your list to start. Go north to the end of the street (away from the river). At the top of the street go straight, Keeping the Ambassador on your left. About 100m up you will see large Blue gates on your left. This is the Garden Of Remembrance (tick!). The statue at the end is of the Children of Lir, as they turned into Swans. As you leave the garden, turn left and continue around the Square to go to the Hugh Lane Gallery, or if you want to leave the Art until later, turn right and return to the spike, and continue the tour.

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  • Mikebb's Profile Photo

    Monument To Daniel O'Connell

    by Mikebb Updated Mar 17, 2009

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    Daniel O'Connell Memorial
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    Walking along O'Connell Street you cannot miss the monument to Daniel O'Connell. The monument took 19 years to complete.

    Daniel O'Connor was known as "The Liberator" as he was the organiser of peacefull rallies of up to a million people in pursuit of Catholic emancipation. He was elected to Parliament in 1828 as the member for Clare.

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  • Jefie's Profile Photo

    A commercial street with an historical twist

    by Jefie Updated May 27, 2009

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    Statue of James Joyce just off O'Connell Street
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    O'Connell Street is the biggest street in Dublin - in fact, it's even one of the largest streets in all of Europe! It's mostly a commercial street, but even if you're not the least interested in shopping, it's still worth walking up O'Connell street to see some of its landmarks. First and foremost, of course, is the General Post Office. The GPO dates back to 1818 and it became part of Irish history when the leaders of the 1916 Easter Rising decided to use it as headquarters and Patrick Pearse read the "Proclamation of the Irish Republic" standing on its front steps. Although the building was almost entirely destroyed during the fight that ensued, its facade and portico somehow survived the heavy bombardment, making it possible to eventually rebuild the GPO behind them and thus preserve an important piece of Ireland's history.

    The median space that runs down the centre of O'Connell Street is home to several statues and monuments, including those dedicated to Charles Stewart Parnell and Daniel O'Connell. There also used to be a monument dedicated to Lord Nelson, but it was bombed in 1966 by former IRA members. In 2003, a new monument was built in its place: the spire of Dublin. It is a 120 m high stainless steel needle, and its top is illuminated at night and can be seen from all over the city - which, as someone pointed out to us, makes it very convenient to find your bearings when you've been pub crawling and have had one too many drinks!! As every monument in Dublin, the Spire has been dubbed with a number of nicknames, but I think my favourite one is "The erection at the intersection" :o) And speaking of statues with nicknames, just a few steps away from the Spire on North Earl Street you'll find a statue of James Joyce depicted as leaning on a cane. This one has of course become "The prick with the stick"!

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  • Pieter11's Profile Photo

    O'Connell Street

    by Pieter11 Written Jul 3, 2007

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    O'Connell Street with the Millennium Spire
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    The heart of the capital is the wide O’Connell Street at the northern bank of the river Liffey. This street is not only the most important traffic connection in the city, but it is also the most important shopping street of the city and the whole country.

    What makes O’Connell Street so very special especially is the width of the street. At the widest point it is 49 metres wide which makes it one of the widest ones in Europe. It has car- and bus lanes in both directions and wide pedestrians areas at both sides of the road as well as in the middle. Along these pedestrian strips you can find luxurious hotels, shops, and restaurants as well as fast-food restaurants and souvenir shops.

    The street, as well as the bridge at the end of it, is named after Daniel O’Connell, an Irish nationalistic leader who lived in the 19th century. His statue is placed at the riverside of its street. Another important monument on O’Connell Street is the 120 meters high Millennium Spire in the middle that was placed here in 2003, as an honour to the new millennium.

    Almost all busses that go through the city pass through O’Connell Street, and when you come from the airport you will surely pass the street. A lot of buildings in the street itself was heavily “damaged” due to renovating works in the past century, but as soon as you enter the streets in its neighbourhood, you will be able to imagine what it used to look like.

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  • MichaelFalk1969's Profile Photo

    O`Connell Street and Bridge

    by MichaelFalk1969 Updated Jun 25, 2007

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    The best-known street in Dublin with lots of historical buildings and monuments (and shops). In the Post Office the Leaders of the Easter Rising 1916 made their last stand. It leads to O`Connell bridge, where you are in walking distance to the Old Customs House, the historic center, Trinity College and Halfpenny Bridge.

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  • acemj's Profile Photo

    O'Connell Street

    by acemj Updated Jun 7, 2003

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    This is the most notable street north of the Liffey and was once even more elegant than Grafton Street. Many of the classical buildings that once lined O'Connell Street were destroyed in the Easter Rising of 1916 when Patrick Pearse and others opposed to British rule made a declaration of Irish independence. However, there are still some grand surviving structures such as the General Post Office, which still has bullet holes from the revolution on the portico. There are also some interesting statues, most impressive of which is the Daniel O'Connell monument near the river and the O'Connell bridge.

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  • Durfun's Profile Photo

    Statues & tributes

    by Durfun Updated Dec 31, 2009

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    The Street from Nelson's pillar viewing platform
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    This wide road (Ireland's widest) is the heart of Dublin, and is adorned with many statues commemorating Irish heroes.

    Where the Spike stands today, Nelson's column stood till 1966 (when it was blown up by the Saor Eire in celebration of the 50th anniversary of the Easter Rising). It's worth noting that this column was finished a lot earlier than it's bigger brother (by 10 feet) in London!

    Also, another monument to Anna Livia was removed to erect the new spire.

    Other statues are still present, such as one honouring Charles Stewart Parnell at the north end of the street; at the southern end stands a statue of Daniel O'Connell (19th century nationalist leader), and near the spire you will see one of trade union leader James Larkin - who is famous for the phrase "The great appear great because you are on your knees - Arise"!!

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  • Airpunk's Profile Photo

    O'Connell Street

    by Airpunk Updated May 8, 2011

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    O'Connell Street
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    This place is considered to be the central place in Dublin. Most of the important bus lines stop here, a couple of important shops and places (Cinema, central post office) are located here and of course the one of other monument: The spike (a metal obelisk), O’Connell’s monument and the statues to Jim Larkin and Charles Stewart Parnell. They are described in separate tips. Note also the small shrine at the taxi stand which gives you an evidence about the role of Catholicism in today’s Irish society. O’Connell street is said to be the widest street in Ireland.
    Unfortunately, this is also one of the places where you are likely to meet some of the less pleasant Dublin citizens. The southernmost point (around the O’Connell monument) is popular with drug addicts and some areas north of O’Connell Street are not the most desirable to be at night. Anyway, O’Connell Street is no more and no less dangerous than comparable places in European capitals. That said, you will find no reason why you shouldn’t be in Dublin’s central street.
    The street was developed by the Earls of Drogheda and was named Drogheda street first. Later, it became Sackville street and upon Irish independence, it was named after one of the forefathers of the Independence movement: Daniel O’Connell, called “the liberator”.

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  • Airpunk's Profile Photo

    Monuments to Irish leaders at O’Connell Street

    by Airpunk Updated May 8, 2011

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    Jim Larkin
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    Daniel O’Connell was the leader of the independence movement in the mid-19th century. He was elected a member of the parliament in 1828 and fought in London for an Irish-Catholic emancipation. He earned the nickname “The Liberator”. O’Connell street was named after him when Ireland became independent in 1922. O’Connell was famous for another thing. He lived for some time in Rome and short before he died there, he decided to have his body buried in Ireland, but his heart in Rome.
    Charles Stewart Parnell opposed the act of Union which led to the dissolution of the Irish parliament and marked the end of Ireland’s autonomy.
    Jim Larkin was a famous trade union leader in the first half of the 20th century. "The great appear great because you are on your knees - Arise"!!

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  • Rojo72's Profile Photo

    The largest street in Dublin

    by Rojo72 Written Jan 27, 2006

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    The SPike at O'Connel Street

    O'Connell Street, named (as so many other streets and places in Dublin) after an Irish independence hero, is the largest street in Dublin. Unfortunately it's not a pedestrial zone like Grafton Street but it is still nice. There are quite a large number of shops and restaurants along the street, but most importantly there are some monuments of O'Connell and Parnell and also the Spike, the modern pride (or shame) of Dublin. Built for the turn of the millenium it's a very tall...hmmm...spike I suppose in the middle of O'Connell street. A perfect meeting point visible over large parts of Dublin. Stand under it and look up and feel how the spike seems to "bend" over your head.

    The cross-street to O'Connell Street at the Spike is Henry Street, one of the shopping streets in Dublin with malls, shops and restaurants. Some pubs nearby too, as there always are...

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  • Airpunk's Profile Photo

    The Spire

    by Airpunk Written Sep 25, 2010

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    The millenium spire was intented to be Dublin’s new landmark, but has recieved mixed criticism. One of the nicknames it earned was “Ireland’s largest heroin needle”, pointing to the drug problem in Dublin which becomes obvious at O’Connell Street. “The erection at the intersection” is one of the more popular ones and thousands more in a similar scheme “Stiletto at the Ghetto”, “Rod to God”, “Stiffey by the Liffey” etc. have appeared. Another popular joke is to answer “It’s a póg mo thóin” (Kiss my ass) to the question what this monument is about. The spire is illuminated at night and makes a good orientation point for lost tourists or drunken pub-crawlers. It’s diameter is 3 meters at the base and10 cm at the top: The spire has a glass tip and its heighth is 120 meters. It was erected to celebrate the new millenium, but typical for Irish projects, it was finished in 2003. Make up your own mind about it. I don’t think that it is particularly ugly, but I don’t think I would miss it if someone would steal it. Its controversity gives it enough reason for being anyway.
    The history of this monument is even more interesting. Once, there was a pillar with a statue of Admiral Nelson on top, similar to the one on London’s Trafalgar Square, but with a public viewing platform. Indeed, Dublin’s statue was older, but the London one was bigger, of course. Unfortunately, Admiral Nelson was seen as a symbol for British rule and some nationalists couldn’t stand him anymore. Therefore, a former IRA group blew up the pillar on March 6th 1966. Some say that it was to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Easter Rising. The spot rested empty for decades until the spike appeared.

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