Phoenix Park, Dublin

4.5 out of 5 stars 4.5 Stars - 38 Reviews

Parkgate St. 353-1677-0095

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  • Farmleigh House
    Farmleigh House
    by MalenaN
  • Deer in Phoenix Park
    Deer in Phoenix Park
    by MalenaN
  • The Walled Garden
    The Walled Garden
    by MalenaN
  • MalenaN's Profile Photo

    Phoenix Park

    by MalenaN Written Apr 5, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Deer in Phoenix Park
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    VT-member Anne Marie took me to Phoenix Park, a place I had never been to before in Dublin. She told me we would probably see some deer and we did. There is a herd of 400 – 450 deer in the park, and they are the descendants of a herd introduced already when the park was established in the 1660s.

    Phoenix Park is a very large park, it is 709 hectares. Here you find a visitor centre, gardens, Dublin Zoo, many monuments and large areas to play in or spread your blanket for a picnic and rest. You can also rent bikes in the park.

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    Farmleigh House

    by MalenaN Written Apr 5, 2013

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    Farmleigh House
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    Farmleigh House, which is situated on the northwestern side of Phoenix Park, was bought by the Irish State from the Guinness family. The house is used for government meetings and to accommodate guests from other countries. When Farmleigh House is not used by the government it is open to the public. Even when the house is used by the government you can still visit the grounds, the walled garden and the gallery.

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  • IrishFem's Profile Photo

    The Residence of the President of Ireland

    by IrishFem Updated Jul 30, 2011

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    Light in the window

    Find your way into the park and beside the Presidents House is the visitors centre. Every Saturday from 9.30 to 15.30 in the winter and 10.30 to 16.30 in the summer the visitors centre arranges tours of the President's House. (Aras an Uachtarain).The tour is free and includes a film, free transport to the House, tour of the exhibition centre, the main state room and gardens. The tickets are issued at the visitors centre. No cameras, no mobile phones are allowed on the tour. When you enter the house you pass a security checkpoint and then you have the police following the tour. The centre provides lockers for your belongings. Booking is not possible, just turn up on the day. It's great because it's free and its also very interesting...

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    Phoenix Park

    by Airpunk Written May 8, 2011

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    The Obelisk
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    Phoenix Park is one of the world’s largest parks within a city. As many other parks in the British islands, it began as hunting grounds and was cut to its present size through the centuries. But unlike Hyde Park or some other of the better known parks, it retained much of its original size and variety in nature, including some wild deer. Its name does not come from the fabulous bird, but from Irish “fionn uisce” which means clear water.
    Although most of the area is covered by grass and wood, some beautiful gardens can be found within the park as well as Dublin zoo. Phoenix Park is rich in monuments and if you like to look for small oddities and commemorative plaques, you will find many of them along the major paths. Larger monuments include the Victory monument of the Duke of Wellington (which fortunately didn’t suffer the same fate as the one of its contra-napoleonic fellow at O’Connell street) and the Papal Cross. Some buildings worth to mention are the US embassy, the residence of the Irish president, a couple of government buildings an even an official visitor center.
    Phoenix park is located around 3 km west of the city centre. This does not seem to be a lot, but add the size of the park to it and the distance you’ll have to walk will multiply. That said, if you are not really crazy for walking, you should consider the bus. And please keep in mind that the park is walled. That means that you will have to look for an entrance to get into the park. The most convenient entrance for me was at Infirmary Road/Conyngham Road, close to River Liffey. For further information or at least alternative entrances, you should consider a map. Some can be downloaded on the homepage of Phoenix Park.

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    Phoenix Park

    by orlikins Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Deer at Phoenix Park
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    The Phoenix Park is huge. It contains Dublin Zoo, Aras an Uachtaran (Residence of the Irish President), the American Ambassador's residence, Office of Irish Ordinance Surveys, Irish Police HQ, Ashtown Castle, Farmleigh House (where prominent foreign politicians stay, when hosted by the Irish Govt), playing fields, the Papal Cross and St. Mary's hospital.

    It's also the place where I learned to drive :)

    Up towards the north-west end of the park, you will see lots of squirrels and deer running around freely, so be careful if you're driving up around that way. The deer are relatively tame and it is easy to take pics of them, but keep your distance from them.

    Not recommended you go in there at night, as the park has an unsavoury reputation for dogging, gay cruising, and knacker-drinking.

    Related to:
    • Zoo
    • Budget Travel

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  • mvtouring's Profile Photo

    Phoenix Park

    by mvtouring Written Nov 3, 2010

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    When you make use of the hop on bus, you can easily get to Phoenix Park (Irish: Páirc an Fhionnuisce) . The park lies 2–4 km west of the city centre, north of the River Liffey. Its 16 km perimeter wall encloses 707 hectares (1,750 acres), one of the largest walled city parks in Europe. It includes large areas of grassland and tree-lined avenues, and since the seventeenth century has been home to a herd of wild Fallow deer. The English name comes from the Irish fionn uisce meaning "clear water".

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  • Dabs's Profile Photo

    Phoenix Park

    by Dabs Updated Nov 1, 2009

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    Wellington Monument
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    After accidentally visiting the War Memorial Garden, I asked someone how to get to Phoenix Park and headed there on foot, by the time I got there I was tired of walking as I had to walk the length of the park to find an entrance into the park. I did walk up to where the zoo was but I didn't get much further as I finally spotted the Dublin Bus and hopped back on. The stop for the Dublin Bus here isn't marked at all because of a park restriction against bus pickups or some such silliness, I presume they think you are going to get off and get back on and you would know where it was, not walk from the Kilmainham Gaol.

    Phoenix Park is Europe's largest walled garden at 1,750 acres, it was originally intended as a deer park for Charles II. The park gets it's name from Phoenix House, the original residence of the British viceroys, which appears to no longer exist. At the entrance on the east side of the garden, there's the People's Garden with some lovely flower beds and in the same general area there's a large obelisk which is a monument to the Duke of Wellington, who was born in Dublin, commemorating his victories including that over Napoleon at Waterloo.

    This map is actually easier to look at than the ones on the official Phoenix Park website, you can see that there is a lot of the park that is just open space and that most of the things to see are on the east side near the People's Garden.

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  • Mikebond's Profile Photo

    Phoenix Park

    by Mikebond Updated Nov 15, 2008

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    Phoenix Park
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    Phoenix Park is located just outside Dublin. Its area of 712 hectares make it the largest park of the city and the largest enclosed urban public park in Europe. Its name could come from Fionn Uisce, "Clear water", referring to an ancient source.
    The 60-metre obelisk where I am portrayed with some course mates is the Wellington Testimonial, erected by Sir Robert Smirke in 1817 to honour the Dubliner Sir Arthur Wellesley (1769-1852), better known as the Duke of Wellington, who defeated Napoleon in Waterloo.

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  • kayleigh06's Profile Photo

    Phoenix Park

    by kayleigh06 Updated Apr 22, 2007

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    With an area of around 707 hectares, Phoenix Park in Dublin is one of the largest parks of any European city. The park is not named, as some may think, in favour of the legendary bird but is a corruption of "fionn usige", which is Gaelic for "clear waters". I remember being here all the time when I was younger with family when we used to go over and visit for 4-6 weeks every year. We would ALWAYS find ourselves back here at this spot - after a daily pub crawl, quite naturally, not that I was drinking back then!! Here you can visit the third oldest zoo in the world, Dublin Zoo (see tips) or can just relax on the grass, its not like you could not find a spot. The park is about 11 km in circumference and includes part of the Liffey valley.

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  • hevbell's Profile Photo

    PHEONIX PARK

    by hevbell Updated Oct 29, 2006

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    Wellington memorial
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    My main piece of advice about Pheonix Park would be: if you are staying in the city centre GET THE BUS! Seriously, it didn't look that far on the map but it seemed to take me hours to walk there on my first visit and by the time I arrived I was far too fed up and knackered to be bothered walking round the park very far!! So it was kind of a waste of time! I did however return [by bus!] on my most recent trip to Dublin and had a much more pleasant time here!

    I knew the park was big but it seemed even bigger than I imagined and very spread out with roads through the middle etc.. In fact its the biggest enclosed city park in Europe. It was originally a Royal Hunting Park but was opened to the public back in 1745 and made a National Historic Park in 1986.

    There is a zoo, Papal cross and various other sites within the park boundaries.. And sports such as Gaelic football, hurling and horseracing all take place here..

    The main photo is of the Wellington Memorial, the tallest Obelisk in Europe.

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  • Rojo72's Profile Photo

    The largest urban Park in the world

    by Rojo72 Written Jan 27, 2006

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    Phoenix Park with mountains in Bray in the rear

    Phoenix Park in Dublin is to my knowledge the largest Urban Park in the world. Situated on the north side of the River, Between Dublin 7,8 and 15 it is easily accessible by foot or by bus. You can walk through the park in a normal pace in about 1½-3 hours.

    The park is home to many deer which you are likely to see, there are also a lot of small forests as well as fields. Some of the park's land is made into football fields.

    Phoenix park is where the Pope held mass in front of 1 million catholics in 1980 (I think) and there is still a huge cros on the scene to be seen ;) .

    The Ambassador of the United States also lives in the park.

    Related to:
    • Religious Travel
    • Hiking and Walking

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  • IrishFem's Profile Photo

    Phoenix Park

    by IrishFem Updated Sep 27, 2005

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    Deers
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    The Phoenix Park is twice the size of New Yorks' central park. It is home to The President of Ireland, see my other tips on the Presidents House. The American Ambassador to Ireland and the Zoo. During the weekend in summertime you can see a game of Gaelic Football, cricket ,soccer and polo. It has many momuments and it really is a lovely place to go for a stroll. Although at night is can be a dangerous place and if your thinking of pitching a tent, think again. The park also has rangers who patrol the park during the day. The park also contains a visitors centre beside a 17th Century Castle, although it is very small and personally speaking not worth paying to go inside. You will also find a small cafe and the food is cheap and delicious. If you want to learn more about what's in the park the visitors center will provide all the information and for 2.75 will show you a video, although its out dated its still very cheap and informative.

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  • Tayto's Profile Photo

    Dublin by Gas Light

    by Tayto Written Jul 22, 2005

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    Dublib by Gas Light

    The phoenix park was one of the first places in the city to have street lighting. At the time these laterns were gas and a watchman had to go around and light each individual gas light. This practice was still in operation in the Phoenix park until the end of the 60's and early 70's. At that time the gas was replaced with electiric wiring and lights but the old victorian stand and laterns were retained. In more recent times many of the lights have been re-converted to gas which can be ignited automaticaly. This gives visitors a sense of the old gas lighting from the 19th centuary.

    A word of caution though is not to stray too far into the park or off the main roads through it too late at night - like all parks its not very safe if travelling alone.

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Cycling

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  • Tayto's Profile Photo

    The Phoenix Park

    by Tayto Written Jul 22, 2005

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    Phoenix Park

    This is reputed to be the largest urban enclosed park in Europe...unless, as they say, you know different ! It was originally an area known for its hunting and the park is currently home to a good number of deer that aren't likely to suffer the same fate as Bambi's mum !

    The park houses the Dublin Zoo (one of the oldest in Europe) Its old victorian design can still be seen in the older buildings. The Azoo as Dubliners call it is being upgraded all the time and trying to create a better environment for its animals. Its well worth a visit and a high proportion of the entrance fee goes directly back to improvement of the Zoo.

    The Park houses Aras an Uachtarain - this is the presidents residence, the police (Garda) headquarters, a militray barracks, victorian Tea rooms. Most of these are accessible via the Infirmery Rd / North Circular road entrance. As one goes further into the park towards Castleknock the park gives way to more open space, playing fileds and small wooded areas.

    It is a great amenity enjoyed by Dubliners and visitors for many years. Like all parks it is not recommended on foot after dark but otherwise its a great place for a ramble, jogging, visiting the Azoo etc. and its worth the trip there.

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Cycling

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  • elcolibri's Profile Photo

    Phoenix Monument

    by elcolibri Written May 29, 2005

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    Phoenix Monument

    Phoenix Monument in Phoenix Park is a Corinthian column with a phoenix bird rising from the ashes at its pinnacle. Erected by the Earl of Chesterfield who opened "Phoenix" Park to the people of Dublin it may be a wrong monument because irishs say the name of the park come from the gaelic "Fion Uisce" which means "clear water" and not Phoenix by the mitologycal bird but Chesterfield didnt know gaelic and put the monument as he understood in english.

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