St Patrick's Cathedral, Dublin

4.5 out of 5 stars 53 Reviews

St Patrick's Close, Dublin +353-1-453 9472

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  • St Patrick's Cathedral
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    St. Patrick's Cathedral in Dublin
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  • alfredop's Profile Photo

    St. Patricks

    by alfredop Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    St. Patricks

    It really is an amazing piece of work - as so many cathedrals are. I can't really give a good description, but go and see for yourself.

    It is not easy to get there if driving or on your own. Ask for directions or take a tour.

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    St. Patrick's Cathedral

    by kathycollins Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    a different perspective of St. Patirck's Cathedral

    This is St. Patrick's Cathedral in Dublin. We did attend a service here, listening to a boys choir. The handmade needlepoint kneelers were really beautiful.
    Living Stones, the cathedral's permanent exhibition, celebrates the cathedral's place in the life of the city, its history, and its role in a fast changing world. It emphasises that the cathedral is not a museum but a building embracing the past, to herald the future.

    Built on the oldest Christian site in Dublin, Saint Patrick’s Cathedral more than any other building in Ireland, embodies the history and heritage of the Irish people form the earliest times to the present day. The Celtic, Anglo-Norman, Mediaeval and Anglo-Irish traditions are all reflected within its walls. It still continues the function for which it was founded—the daily offering of worship to God through the medium of great music.

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  • kathycollins's Profile Photo

    St Patrick's Cathedral, Dublin

    by kathycollins Updated Apr 4, 2011

    Peace amid the bubbling activity of Dublin!
    Saint Patrick on his journey through Ireland is said to have passed through Dublin. In a well close to where the cathedral now stands, he is reputed to have baptised converts from paganism to Christianity. To commemorate his visit, a small wooden church was built on this site, one of the four Celtic parish churches in Dublin.
    In 1191, under John Comyn, the first Anglo-Norman archbishop of Dublin, Saint Patrick's was raised to the status of a cathedral and the present building, the largest church in the country, was erected between 1200 and 1270. Over the centuries as the elements, religious reformation and persecution took their toll, the cathedral fell into serious disrepair, despite many attempts to restore it. Eventually between 1860 and 1900 a full-scale restoration based on the original design, was carried out by the Guinness family.
    Saint Patrick's has contributed much to Irish life throughout its long history. The writer and satirist Jonathan Swift was dean from 1713–45. His grave and epitaph are situated near the entrance of the cathedral. The massive west tower dates from 1370 and houses one of the largest peal of bells in Ireland. The choir school was founded in 1432 and the cathedral choir took part in the first performance of Handel's Messiah in 1742. The Huguenots worshipped here from 1666 to 1816.
    Saint Patrick's is not however a museum, but a living building with services held every day of the year, and sung services on six days of the week.

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    St. Patrick's Cathedral

    by Dabs Updated Nov 30, 2009

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    St. Patrick's Cathedral

    Built in honor of Ireland's patron saint, St. Patrick, the current church standing on this site was built between 1200 and 1270. It's the largest church in Ireland, one of the two Church of Ireland cathedrals in Dublin. Jonathan Swift, author of Gulliver's Travels, is buried here along with his long term partner Stella.

    I didn't visit the interior, currently there is an £5.50 charge to visit and by the time I got to Dublin I was a little "churched out". It's not included on the Heritage Card that I had but it is included in the Heritage Island Touring Guide that mostly gives 2 for 1 discounts on attractions.

    I did have a nice break in the garden though, I brought my fish and chip lunch from Leo Burdock just up the street and had a seat on one of the benches admiring the view of the exterior of the cathedral.

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    St Patrick's Cathedral

    by Mikebb Updated Mar 18, 2009

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    The Main Chapel
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    I thought this would have been a Catholic Cathedral, however on entry and talking to one of the Security people I was informed when built over 800 years ago it was Catholic, however it became Church of Ireland at the time of the Reformation and King Henry VIII.

    Much of the present building dates back to work done between 1254 and 1270. Extensive renovations were undertaken during the 1860's through the generosity of the Guiness family.

    There is much to see in this Cathedral and you should allocate a minimum of a half hour, possibly extending another hour should you wish to get into the detail. Adult entry is Euro 5.50.

    Related to:
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    • Religious Travel
    • Historical Travel

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  • sarahandgareth's Profile Photo

    St Patrick's Cathedral

    by sarahandgareth Updated Aug 4, 2004

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    Dark Stained Glass in St Patrick's

    St Patrick's Cathedral is just down the street from Christ Church: it seems remarkable to have two such buildings little more than a stone's throw from each other.

    The park next to the church is reputedly a site where St Patrick made several conversions in the fifth century, and while a church was built on the spot, the present building dates 'only' to the twelfth century. The cathedral has had many ups and downs - some of them paralleling the turbulence of the Reformation. It has been restored on many occasions, most recently in an extensive mid-nineteenth century overhaul funded in part by the Guinness family. At one point in the late 1700s, the cathedral was in such parlous shape that services had to be suspended for some years.

    The Cathedral's most famous Dean was Jonathan Swift, author of, among other tomes, Gulliver's Travels. Born in Ireland, he aspired to a bishopric in England, but his outspoken nature and his role as a political gadfly meant that he was given a relatively quiet place in Dublin. Even today, many people refer to him as Dean Swift rather than using his first name.

    Take a moment, while here, to look at the plaques commemorating the many, many Irish people who fought and died in the British army - from Amritsar to Ypres. The roll of the dead from the First World War is especially moving - even more so when you recall that many Irish people saw those soldiers as an embarrassment once Ireland achieved independence a few years later. It's only in the very recent past that they are being accorded the respect they deserve.

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    ST PATRICKS CATHEDRAL

    by hevbell Updated Dec 13, 2003

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    St Patricks cathedral

    The current church dates from sometime between 1190 & 1225 but since its believed that St Patrick himself baptised people in a well in the grounds, this is one of the cities earliest Christain sites. Its an impressive church but costs €4.50 entry so I just looked around the grounds.

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  • arlequin_g's Profile Photo

    ST. PATRICK’S CATHEDRAL

    by arlequin_g Written Oct 27, 2003

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    Paying 4 euros you’ll have the right to enter to this magnificient building and enjoy your visit listening to the music of the great organ. It was first created as a church in 1192 and in 1219 get the status of cathedral. There are too much to be seen. See the grave of Jonathan Swift (the author of “the travels of Gulliver”). Also the Celtic tombstones and much more interesting things.

    Daily: 9-18 except saturday (nov.-feb) 9-17 and sunday (nov-feb) 10-15

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    Great staircase

    by acemj Updated Jun 7, 2003

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    This picture hardly does this staircase justice. It's located in a dim corner of the cathedral on the opposite side from which you'll enter the church. It spirals up the the choir, but unfortunately visitors are not permitted to climb up.

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    Marsh's Library

    by dubrovnik Written Mar 8, 2003

    Marsh's Library is Ireland’s first public library situated within the grounds of St. Patrick’s Cathedral. Built in 1701 by Archbishop Narcissus Marsh it contains over 25,000 volumes and 200 valuable ancient manuscripts. The interior fittings have remained unaltered since the days when Dean Swift worked here as Dean of St Patrick's Cathedral nearby.

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    st patrick's cathedral

    by dubrovnik Written Mar 8, 2003

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    Ireland’s largest church, St Patrick’s Cathedral, stands on what is probably the oldest Christian site in Ireland. A wooden church was built here in the fifth century after Ireland’s patron saint, St Patrick, baptised his first Christian converts at a well on the site. St. Patrick’s was founded in 1191 by the first Anglo-Norman Bishop of Dublin, John Comyn. It derived it’s international fame from association with the 18th century writer and author of “Gulliver’s Travels”, Jonathan Swift who was Dean of St. Patrick from 1713 to 1745 and whose tomb is there. The cathedral was extensively restored in the mid-nineteenth century by a member of the Guinness family.

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  • Sunshine64's Profile Photo

    St. Patrick's Cathedral

    by Sunshine64 Updated Mar 8, 2003

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    Inside St. Patrick's Cathedral

    I'm not a religious person, but this place is awe-inspiring. The history, the stained glass, everything.

    We attended an 'Evensong' service, and the chior sining in Latin in the beautiful cathedral was amazing.

    I loved the Guinness keg used for donations to restore the organ!

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits

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  • kathycollins's Profile Photo

    St. Patrick's Well

    by kathycollins Written Sep 12, 2002

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    St Patrick's Well

    Walking around St. Patrick's Cathedral and you find all kinds of treasures including this stone apparently used as a marker for a Holy Well.
    The whole concept of Holy Wells is intriguing. Blending the native ancient culture's belief in the religious significance of things of the earth and water as healing and purification agent, with Christianity's belief in water as baptismal purifier, St. Patrick swept into Ireland, converting the population not by pointing to their differences but their similarity. Religious wells are still found throughout Ireland, and still revered. they seem to eminate a peaceful healing quality when you visit.

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    St. Patrick's Cathedral

    by thunderbox Written Aug 25, 2002

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    Ireland's largest Cathedral.
    Jonathon Swift's crypt is here.
    Very pirty cathedral and the gardens in front are nice also.
    When we went, there were a bunch of little kids chasing each other with water guns even though it was raining.

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  • jenna24's Profile Photo

    St. Patrick's Cathedral

    by jenna24 Updated Aug 25, 2002

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    St. Patrick's Cathedral
    St Patrick's is one of two Anglican cathedrals in Dublin. It is built on the site where St Patrick is said to have baptised converts to Christianity. St Patrick's Cathedral, in its present state, was constructed in 1192, replacing an original wooden chapel.

    The main attractions in St Patrick's are the tombs of Jonathan Swift and his lover in the nave. The cathedral also contains the longest medieval nave in Ireland, and a stone slab, engraved with a Celtic cross, that covers the well from which St Patrick baptised the converts. The adjoining garden is a welcome oasis in this densely built-up district of the city.

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