Dublin Airport, Dublin

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  • Dublin Airport
    by yooperprof
  • Dublin Airport
    by yooperprof
  • Dublin Airport
    by BillNJ
  • BillNJ's Profile Photo

    Many Free Irish Whiskey Samples at the Airport

    by BillNJ Updated Apr 4, 2011

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Dublin Airport is Ireland's largest. Most of the air traffic at the airport is international. My incoming and outgoing flights on Continental were both direct -- between Newark (New Jersey) and Dublin.

    The airport is located only 6.2 miles (10 kilometers) north of the city centre. After my arrival, I took the Air Coach service which charged a flat fee of 8 Euros.

    Before my return flight, I had a full Irish breakfast at a cafe on the second floor. Then, on my way to the gate for my flight, I walked through a big duty free shopping area. Even early in the morning, there were many salespeople offering free samples of Irish Whiskey and other liqueurs such as Bailey's Irish Creme. In fact, there were so many that I even had to turn some down! (haha)

    I took a photo outside of the airport. However, due to the tight security, I did not take any photos inside the airport.

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    Allow enough time

    by christine.j Written May 5, 2009

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Check-in is very easy in the airport, there are many check-in machines which are easy to operate. You won't need much time here. But after check-in make sure you go to the security checks in time.

    The security in Dublin Airport is very strict and takes a long time. It's one bag only and you have to take out any umbrella and open it.

    It's also a long walk to the new terminal for flights to Germany, so make sure to check in early enough.After check-in it took us more than 45 minutes to the gate, the line at security was very long.

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  • Dabs's Profile Photo

    Dublin airport

    by Dabs Updated Sep 25, 2010

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Our second experience on Aer Lingus wasn't nearly as good as the first, the first time we got exit rows both directions and had SO much leg room that I almost didn't even mind flying. This time we were in the regular coach seats, no smaller than the average plane but certainly not as pleasant. The dinner selection didn't look particularly appetizing either direction, fortunately we ate before getting on the plane in Chicago and I brought a sandwich for the flight back. The thing I did like about the flight was that you had a selection of movies that you could watch at your choosing. On the way back my suitcase had an unscheduled layover in Boston, the bag was tagged correctly, and I got it a day later when their courier service left it on the front stairs of my house instead of calling me as promised.

    Dublin's airport is a manageable size compared to O'Hare or Heathrow and everything is very easy to find. Coming into Dublin, immigration was a breeze. If you are flying back to the US from Dublin, you may pass through US immigration in Dublin and need to allot extra time for this. There was a flight to Orlando that seemed to not go through US immigration in Dublin, not sure why. Once you get past immigration, there is not much in the way of food, just a snack shop, and no shopping so do that before you pass through.

    Aer Lingus has self service check in machines and a bag drop, it took all of about 10 minutes to check in including switching my seat to an exit row on the 1st trip, on the 2nd trip I connected from London.

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    Dublin Airport

    by IrishFem Written Jun 12, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Dublin Airport is located about 13k north of the city centre. Major works are taken place as the amount of travellers passing through is growing. On the arrivals level you will find lots of cafe's takeaway's and fast food outlets. Along with a few bars. On the ground level there is a post office, currency exchange, and a Dublin tourism office. a transport desk with train and bus details. Left luggage is open daily from 6am to 11pm. The charges around around 4 Euro per item for 24 hours. For general enquiries call 01 814 1111

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  • HORSCHECK's Profile Photo

    To Dublin by plane

    by HORSCHECK Updated Feb 1, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Plane of Aer Lingus

    The quickest way to travel to Dublin is by plane.Various airlines like the Irish Aer Lingus or Ryanair and the German Lufthansa or Germanwings operate services to Dublin.
    The International Airport of Dublin is located about 8 miles (12 km) north of Dublin.

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    Sourbugger's airport parking weeze

    by sourbugger Updated Jan 4, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    I cannot guarantee this will work - but it worth a try if you want to save some money on parking your car at the airport. The DAA (Dublin airport authority) charge silly amounts of money to park there. Even their best rate to stay in the long-term car park is a whopping seven euro a day (must the booked 48 hours ahead on-line)

    So here is Sourbugger's guide to saving you a few bob if you really must drive to the airport.

    - book in at the travelodge in ballymun. They have a secure underground car park priced at a reasonable 5 euro a day

    - walk about 100 yards to the Metro Hotel who have a 2 euro return shuttle to the terminal (you will have to tell them you parked your car there!)

    If you feel uneasy about telling a little lie like that that then the Metro hotel, Ballymun rate is still a fairly reasonable 6 euro a day. A taxi from the Travelodge would be about 12 euro each way (which might still work out cheaper than the long term car park if travelling for a couple of weeks or more) or take a normal dublin bus to the airport.

    Check on comparison sites for other hotels who may be doing a good deal at around 5 euro per day.

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    Departing from Terminal 2

    by yooperprof Written Jul 18, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

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    Terminal 2 at Dublin was planned during the period of the Celtic Tiger, when Ireland's economy was the envy of Europe. However, Terminal 2 opened in 2010, in the middle of a severe recession, and there still seems to be a lot of underused capacity here. Which isn't such a bad thing for a passenger. It's also nice for US bound passengers that you can pass through US Customs and Security here, particularly if you will be flying through one of the less modern US airports - which (come to think of it) is "most of them".

    Terminal 2 was designed by the London-based firm of Pascall+Watson.

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  • Airpunk's Profile Photo

    To Dublin by plane

    by Airpunk Written May 5, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Chaotic-looking ramp scene at Dublin Airport

    Dublin is one of the best served destinations in Europe with Ryanair and Aer Lingus offering flights to many places. Both airlines offer affordable fares, with Ryanair being far cheaper, but a lot trickier in the booking procedure. If you are familiar with Ryanair and your airport does not have a Dublin route anymore (so as my two closest Ryanair airports), try self-connecting via Stansted. The Dublin – Stansted route is served more than five times a day. There are also services to North America and Asia by a dozen of intercontinental airlines. Regional services are provided too, mostly by Aer Arann.
    Dublin airport has no rail service, but is well-connected by bus with the city center. Check out my separate tip To/From the airport for further information.

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    Connecting Flights at Dublin Airport

    by Airpunk Written Sep 3, 2010

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Sevreal airlines - several aircraft

    This transportation tip saved my day in 2009 and maybe it can be of some use for you. I still consider it among the most valuable tips on my page.

    If you are connecting onto another flight in Dublin and travel with hand-luggage only, there is a way to skip the queues at security control. For that, you’ll have to be in possession of a borading pass already. After you have passed immigration clearance (which you have to pass, even if arriving from the UK), you will find yourself in the baggage claim area. Instead of going outside and upstairs again, head to baggage belt No. 1 (facing the exit, it is the one far right). Next to it, you’ll find a stair which will lead you up to a security control lane where you’ll find no queues. Soon you’ll find yourself again in the security area where you’ll just have to look out for your gate.

    What is the secret? Of course, not all connecting passengers travel with hand luggage only or are already checked in. Those have to use the same security check areas as the passengers leaving from Dublin. Another factor is the bad signposting in the baggage claim area. There are few signs pointing out this way so that even passengers who can use it are not able to find it.

    In my case, I had only one hour to get my onward flight and as I was a self-connecting passenger, it was my responsibility to get to the gate on time. Elsewhere, I would not be entitled to any refunds. I rushed through the airport from one gate to another within less than fifteen minutes. In addition to the early arrival of my Ryanair flight, I even had time for a Guinness before boarding.

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  • cjg1's Profile Photo

    Dublin Airport - DUB

    by cjg1 Updated Feb 20, 2008

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This is your typical wannabe big but isn't airport. I did find the wait times to be small and the basic selection of shopping to be ok. Sadly Aer Lingus is no longer One World and the club does not recognize AA status even though they still codeshare flights.

    One very good point about this airport is that US Immigration is downstairs in the one set of gates and you clear it before you board instead of having to do it upon arrival in the States. This allows smoother connections if need be when you get there.

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  • orlikins's Profile Photo

    Dublin Airport

    by orlikins Updated Aug 31, 2006

    2 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Dublin Airport

    Dublin Airport is 10km north of the city -get the 41bus from Eden Quay (about €1.30 fare) or get the blue Aircoach (special stops around the city centre) for €5.

    Here's a pic of us in Dublin Airport before catching our flight to Prague. :-)

    Taxis to and from Dublin airport to the city centre will cost you about €15-25, with a fee added for luggage & extra passengers.

    There is no train or Luas connection to the Airport. :(

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  • Waoife's Profile Photo

    There is only one airport in...

    by Waoife Updated Jul 23, 2010

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    There is only one airport in Dublin.

    It is well linked to the city centre by bus so take the best airfare you can get (no need to worry about landing in a field in the middle of nowhere!!!) & come to visit this great city!!!

    The two Irish airlines worth checking out for fares are:
    www.aerlingus.com
    www.ryanair.com
    Of course your own country's airlines may offer better deals so shop around!!!

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  • leafmcgowan's Profile Photo

    Dublin International Airport

    by leafmcgowan Written Jun 11, 2010

    The Dublin International Airport or "Aerfort Bhaile Átha Cliath" is actually located in Collinstown, Ireland - not Dublin. It was instituted in the early 1930's. It is however operated and managed by the Dublin Airport Authority. It is located in the Fingal part of County Dublin and is about a 20-30 minute bus ride to Dublin's city center being approximately 10 km (6.2 miles) away. The Dublin Airport hosts over 20 million passengers a year (2009 estimates). It is the busiest airport in the Republic of Ireland, followed by Cork and Shannon. The transportation to and from the Dublin Airport is by bus, taxi, car, or foot (not recommended). It also has in development a underground railway line called "Metro North" that will connect it to Swords and Dublin City Center in the near future. It is also the headquarters of Ireland's flag carrier Aer Lingus, Europe's largest no-frills airline Ryanair & Ireland's domestic, CityJet (based in Swords) and the regional airline Aer Arann. There are over 50 daily departures from Dublin to all of London's airports which is busiest route in the world after Hong Kong - Tapei. There are 30+ daily departures to other UK locations. US Legacy Carriers also serve the airport from major US hubs. The Dublin Airport is also one of the only two European airports that have U.S. border preclearance services along with Shannon.
    The original international style passenger terminal was completed in 1941. In 1936 Ireland's Government established the civil airline "Aer Lingus" first as a military aerodrome 'Casement Aerodrome' at Baldonnel to the south of Dublin - then established as a civil airport to replace Baldonnel as the city's airport. The first flight from the airport took place on January 19, 1940 to Liverpool, England. The terminal building was done by architect Desmond FitzGerland and was heavily influenced by designs used on luxury ocean liners at the time. It was awarded the Triennial Gold Medal of the Royal Hibernian Institute of Architects and is now a listed building. With World War II, services were restricted at airport until late 1945. Three new runways were constructed by 1947. The Airport saw major growth in the 1950's with construction of Runway extensions, terminal enhancements, and new services - including British European Airways, Sabena, and BKS. The 60's saw advancement with technological improvements and by the 70's were receiving numerous Boeing 737's, BAC One-Elevens, Boing 707s, and Hawker Siddeley Tridents. 1993 was when the Republic of Ireland and the U.S. Government signed a bilateral agreement to allow airlines to operate some direct transatlantic services for the first time to/from Dublin Airport instead of touching down en route at Shannon, even though Airlines have to still provide an equal number of flights either to or through Shannon as to Dublin. When Ireland hit its "Celtic Tiger" Economy, the airport hit a growth spurt between 1990-2000 based on a demand for business travel to and from the country with an increase in inward tourism. Also with Ireland being one of the only three European Union countries to open its borders freely to workers fro mthe ten accession states of the Union in 2004 - a increase of hundreds of thousands of people moving to Ireland via the airlines took place. Very ambitious expansion plans are in effect for the Dublin airport including new routes to North America and the Middle East. 2007 saw Open Skies agreements between the U.S. and the E.U. became ratified. In my arrival off Continental from the U.S. and my departure from Dublin to Bristol on RyanAir - I found the airport easy to navigate and able to find my gates. There were not many power plugs for laptops that I could find, but other services seemed abundant. Public transportation from the airport to the city center was affordable and easy to find. The Car Park also has a left luggage (luggage drop off to store) and its conveniently right across from arrivals. 6.5 Euro a day. Dublin was a good experience. Rating: 3.7 stars out of 5.

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    Bus/coach from airport to beyond city centre

    by IanHB Written Apr 17, 2011

    If you are going beyond the City Centre (Trinity, St Stephens green) use the Aircoach service from outside the terminal (it stops at both terminals) - I think there are 5 routes, including Cork. I went to Leopardstown for 8 euros instead of 35 Euros for the taxi - and the bus stops outside the main hotels (Montrose, Radisson). I think it is also 5 Euros to the city centre. Great value! Fast and clean - every 15 minutes.

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  • mvtouring's Profile Photo

    Dublin airport

    by mvtouring Updated Nov 3, 2010
    Dublin airport
    1 more image

    We arrived via Ryanair and I have to tell you that the friendliest passport control staff is to be found here at this airport. The only "bad" part is that the terminal where Ryanair parks is miles away from the main entrance, so be prepared to walk far and if you have someone old with you, rather arrange for a wheelchair.

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