Malahide Things to Do

  • Heading For The Bar!
    Heading For The Bar!
    by johngayton
  • The Lounge Frontage
    The Lounge Frontage
    by johngayton
  • Smyth's Frontage
    Smyth's Frontage
    by johngayton

Best Rated Things to Do in Malahide

  • Mikebb's Profile Photo

    Malahide Castle - Home Of The Talbots

    by Mikebb Updated Mar 5, 2009

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    We visited this castle late afternoon arriving a little after 5pm to see it had just closed for the day.

    Set in extensive parklands this land was taken by the Normans and in the year 1174 they installed Sir Richard Talbot as Lord of Malahide Estate. The dynasty lasted 8 centuries up to the death of Lord Milo Talbot in 1973.

    Malahide Castle and demesne is now under the care of Dublin County Council.

    Malahide Castle Set In Extensive Parklands Malahide Castle
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Budget Travel
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Mikebb's Profile Photo

    New Street, Restaurants, Shops & Flowering Pots

    by Mikebb Updated Mar 6, 2009

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Malahide has won the Tidy Town Competion and as you walk through the streets you can see why they were winners. Everything is neat and colourful. Clean roads, pots in flower hanging from buildings , green parks everywhere and clean footpaths.

    A joy to walk the streets and enjoy the history of the town. New street is where we had dinner and then walked down to the marina.

    New Street, A Charming Street In Flower New Street Corner & Traffic Lights.
    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Seniors
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Mikebb's Profile Photo

    Velvet Strand - Where Flight History Was Made

    by Mikebb Updated Mar 6, 2009

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    About a 3 minute drive from the village on the road to Portmarnock you will arrive at a nice beach, however this beachland has a place in history.

    It was from here on June 24th, 1930 that the Southern Cross, piloted by the great Australian aviator Sir Charles Kingsford-Smith with Irishman Captain Paddy Saul as navigator, flew to Newfoundland, Canada, on what was the second ever airplane flight across the Atlantic Ocean from east to west.

    Besides the history this is a very nice beach, but a little cold for us to go swimming as we are used to much warmed waters.

    Velvet Strand Beach & Notice. Velvet Stand Beachland.
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Family Travel
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • johngayton's Profile Photo

    Go For A Beer #2 Smyth's

    by johngayton Updated Jul 9, 2009

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Like Duffy's, Smyth's comprises two separate bars - the public bar and the lounge, although these have a common entrance. I don't know anything about the lounge except that it is on the right! Joe and Ellen had already spent the previous evening reconoitering and so we headed straight for the public bar.

    This was the "jewel in the crown" as far as my personal taste in bars goes - cracking bar! Ellen and Joe, having been in the night before, were received like long-lost returning siblings by a couple of the regulars and even I, who had never previously set foot in the town (far less the pub) was greeted by name and warm handshakes - Ellen and Joe having told them I was due to visit.

    Yep this was definitely the place for The Craic as we shot the bull with the mad Irishmen, Billy and Finn, talking travel and pubs, travel and beer ( and knocking back a few of them as well - thirsty work shooting the bull!!).

    The public bar was exactly what a public bar should be - nothing fancy just good company and great craic!

    Smyth's Frontage Ellen and the Mad Irishmen!

    Was this review helpful?

  • Mikebb's Profile Photo

    Church Spire Towers Over The Town

    by Mikebb Updated Mar 6, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Towering over the village is the beautiful church spire, a focal point of the village and a good signpost for any tourists who may have lost their way.

    The Web Page link below will take you to the Malahide Historical Society page where there is some very interesting information.

    Church Spire Towers Over Landscape
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Mikebb's Profile Photo

    Colourful Homes & Apartments - Tidy Village

    by Mikebb Written Mar 6, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This is a very beautiful village with great community pride, wonderful attractions, brilliant scenery including seascape , parklands and gardens. When we visited in late August the weather was warm and calm.

    Only 10 minutes from Dublin Airport it is an ideal place for an overnight stay for that early morning flight and avoid the Dublin traffic.

    Homes Opposite The Train Station Apartments At The Marina Well Kept Homes
    Related to:
    • Seniors
    • Backpacking
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • johngayton's Profile Photo

    Go For A Beer #1 - Gibney's

    by johngayton Updated Mar 15, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Gibney's, with its seven separate bar and lounge areas, is a rambling ramshackle of a pub. Each of the seven areas has its own characteristic: the Bar is just that - a bar area for a quiet beer or just to shoot the bull; the Front Lounge is at the front, strangely enough, and is ideal for sitting around the real fire; the Back Kitchen is a tucked away little room for those who want to enjoy the pub but with a little peace and quiet; the Well Room is so-called because its main feature is a well (again strangely enough) and is where most of the pub's entertainment takes place; the Wine Room is set up like a wine bar but you can have your beer there if you want; the Sports Bar has the usual big tellies and is also used as a live music venue and last, but not least, there is a sheltered beer garden caled the Yard for those open air enthusiasts (ie - smokers!).

    I've only been here for a couple of afternoon beers and service has been friendly enough, although I found the pub to be a little too big for my personal tastes. Worth a visit tho!

    Location
    Related to:
    • Trains
    • Beer Tasting

    Was this review helpful?

  • johngayton's Profile Photo

    Go For A Beer #3 - Duffy's

    by johngayton Updated Mar 15, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Duffy's on Main Street certainly stands out from the row of shops in which it is located with its bright red bar frontage (I was going to say pillar box red but then I remembered that the Irish post boxes are in fact green) and its cobalt-blue lounge exterior.

    This is a slightly glammed-up Victorian type pub with separate bar and lounge areas. Friendly locals and staff and a relaxed slightly gentrified ambience - well at least it was on a quiet Monday, early evening. Not a bad boozer!

    Heading For The Bar! The Lounge Frontage
    Related to:
    • Beer Tasting

    Was this review helpful?

  • Mikebb's Profile Photo

    The Globe On The Velvet Coast

    by Mikebb Updated Mar 7, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Malahide-Portmarnock Road follows the Velvet Coast which has plenty of places to park the car and enjoy the sand and water. We stayed on the grass and enjoyed the view.

    We came to the large Globe which stands out on the flat grass. Many people have their photo taken beside it , but we just chose to photo as a memory of our visit.

    The Globe
    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Budget Travel
    • Seniors

    Was this review helpful?

  • Mikebb's Profile Photo

    Church Ruins & Graveyard Behind Castle

    by Mikebb Written Mar 8, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    After taking photos of Malahide Castle we walked to the rear and found the ruins of a church. There was also an old graveyard with tombstones. We took a few photos but had no interest in checking out the gravestones which a fellow tourist said dated back centuries.

    Graveyard Beside The Church Ruins Graveyard Behind Castle Gardens & Part Of Church Ruins.
    Related to:
    • Seniors
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Mikebb's Profile Photo

    Walking Through The Castle Parklands.

    by Mikebb Written Mar 8, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Our walk to Malahide Castle took approximately 20 minutes from the village centre. We passed through an assortment of playing fields, including Rugby and Cricket and most likely the adjacent fields used for football.

    The pathway was lined with large trees, then onto open parkland, childrens' playgrounds, botanical gardens, the toy railway museum and several other attractions. We were there on a sunny August afternoon, ideal for walking.

    Pathway To Castle, Trees Everywhere Beautiful Plants Close To Pathway Potential Cricket Stars Parklands In Front Of Castle Majestic Peacock
    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Family Travel
    • Seniors

    Was this review helpful?

  • MalenaN's Profile Photo

    Malahide Castle grounds

    by MalenaN Written Apr 12, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The parklands around Malahide Castle covers about 250 acres. Here you can find nice walks, fields for playing and places where it is nice to have a picnic in summer. Within the grounds there are is also a cricket pitch, tennis courts and a golf course. Next to the castle is a botanical garden with more than 500 species of plants (it was closed in February), and near are the ruins of an Abbey, the Fry Model Railway and a few handicraft shops.

    Nice place for a walk
    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Golf

    Was this review helpful?

  • MalenaN's Profile Photo

    Malahide Castle

    by MalenaN Written Apr 11, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    For more than 750 years the same family was living at Malahide Castle. The Talbot family lived here between 1185 - 1973, except the years when Cromwell was in Ireland 1649 - 1660. The last Lord Talbot died in 1973 and then his sister sold the castle to the Irish state and moved to a family plantation in Tasmania.

    To see the castle you must join a guided tour. I don’t think you will have to wait very long, I didn’t even if it was February when I visited. The first room the group was taken to was a 16th century oak room with beautiful carvings. In the castle there are many lovely furniture and portrait paintings (many of the paintings are from the National Gallery), but you are not allowed to take any photos of them.

    Entrance fee is 7 Euro (February 2007).
    The castle is open all year round Monday - Saturday between 10am - 5pm. It is also open on Sundays and Public Holidays, April - September 10pm -6am and October - March 11am - 5pm. There are no tours around lunch, 12.45pm - 2pm.

    Malahide Castle entrance
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces

    Was this review helpful?

  • lbhspatriot's Profile Photo

    Malahide Castle

    by lbhspatriot Written May 3, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Malahide Castle is set on 250 acres of park land and was both a fortress and a private home for nearly eight hundred years. The Talbot family lived here from 1185 to 1973, when the last Lord Talbot died, his sister sold it to the town of Malahide and moved to Australia.

    The house is certailny worth visiting, it is furnished with beautiful period furniture together with an extensive collection of Irish portrait paintings. A guided tour will take you centuries back to everyday life of the Talbot family and maybe if you are really lucky you will spot the castle ghost!

    Opening Times:
    January – December
    Monday – Saturday 10am to 5pm
    April – September
    Sunday & public holidays 10am to 6pm
    October – March
    Sunday & public holidays 11am to 5pm
    Closed for tours 12.45pm to 2pm
    Restaurant remains open during lunch

    Admission Prices:

    Adults: €7.25
    Concession: €6.10
    Children (under 12): €4.55
    Family: €21.00

    Was this review helpful?

  • lbhspatriot's Profile Photo

    Tara's Palace

    by lbhspatriot Updated May 3, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Tara's Palace is undoubtedly one of the world's most significant exhibition of Doll's Houses, beutifully arranged compositions will take your breaths away!

    This museum is decorated with Paintings by leading Irish Artists and consist of miniature furnishing masterpieces adorn the State Rooms and private apartments. The displays are supported by a collection of dolls, antique toys and other dolls houses, including "Portobello", circa 1700, one of the earliest surviving dolls houses from the Collection of Vivien Green, Dolls House from the family of Lady Wilde (Oscar's Mother).
    It is a great tourist spot as it adjoins the Fry Model Railway and the Malahide castle.
    Perfect place for a family get-away.

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Malahide

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

112 travelers online now

Comments

Malahide Things to Do

Reviews and photos of Malahide things to do posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Malahide sightseeing.

View all Malahide hotels